Fewer Americans Than Ever Trust U.S. Government Reply

CBS DC

For Every 10 Americans, Only 3 Trust The Government

WASHINGTON (CBSDC) – The Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. has found that fewer Americans than ever trust the decisions made by the government.

Data collected from a survey taken in January of this year indicates that all demographics and partisan groups experienced an increasing lack of faith in government leadership, according to a release posted on the Pew Research website late last week. More…

The World of 2100 Reply

Interesting insights from Robert Kaplan

Ancient and medieval mapmakers would better understand the world of 2100 than would the politicians of 2000. Nations as we know them have existed for only a few hundred years. But cities have been with us since the dawn of civilization. And while the future of the city is not Robert D. Kaplan, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, is the author of “The Coming Anarchy,” a forthcoming book.

While the future of the city is not in doubt, modern nations will probably continue to weaken in the 21st century. By 2100, the organizing principle of the world will be the City-state, along with the urban radials of prosperity that follow major trade routes.

Indeed, loyalty toward the polis will gradually overwhelm the traditional state patriotism of the 20th century. Empires will be agglomerations of urban areas. Cities and their hinterlands will make alliances and fight wars with and against each other – less over territory than over bandwidths in cyberspace and trade privileges. Power politics will prove eternal.

More…

City-states are the Future? Reply

Trendsimwatching.com

Trend: Nation-states may be losing power to smaller entities as globalization sorts cultures into regions based on city-states.

VC Confidential describes a dinner talk by futurist Paul Saffo. Excerpts below.

Link: VC Confidential: A Global Evening with Paul Saffo

…our world is moving from one of nation-states to one of city-states. Rather than the future being one of the US versus China, it is going to be Silicon Valley vs Beijing or Chicago vs. Paris. Each dominant city will define its region. With the globalization of trade and the impact of the internet, people will identify both with the culture established by their city/region as well as with global, cross-border influences/factors such as Islam. With the “flattening” of the world, Chicago is no longer vying with US cities like New York for influence, commerce and jobs, but other major cities in the world.

More…

Farrakhan Urges Black Americans to Collectively Purchase Land, Use Gangs As Militias Reply

If only all leaders of resistance movements had the level of competence and vision as this man.

The Blaze

The Minister Louis Farrakhan, 79, delivered his annual Saviors’ Day sermon on Sunday. As is usually the case, the three-hour address covered a variety of topics ranging from current events to the faith leader’s contentious views on race relations. Of particular note was an economic plan he posited — one in which African Americans would come together to invest in land — and a pledge to reach out to gang leaders to ask them for assistance in protecting the Nation of Islam’s interests.

More…

Occupy Wall Street: Revolt of the Upper Middle Class? Reply

By Rad Geek

Last month there was a research report from Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce and Penny Lewis on the economic background of people who participated in some #OWS events in New York City. The New York Times and other press outlets picked up on one of the report’s findings — that More than a third of the people who participated in Occupy Wall Street protests in New York lived in households with annual incomes of $100,000 or more … and more than two-thirds had professional jobs. Over on Facebook, Thaddeus Russell’s quick commentary on the story was:

New York Times: In Occupy, Well-Educated Professionals Far Outnumbered Jobless, Study Finds

Thaddeus Russell: There has never been a political movement in the United States in which this wasn’t the case.

— Thaddeus Russell, near Los Angeles, CA., on Facebook (January 28, 2013)

More…

The Republican Party Can’t Die Soon Enough 3

Voices Newspaper

Some shocking figures:  On average, each Wisconsin’s 5,700,000 residents gives $268 dollars to subsidize business — corporate welfare.  Ten cents of every dollar in the state budget subsidizes business — 10 percent of Wisconsin’s budget is corporate welfare.

Scott Walker’s Wisconsin leads America in corporate welfare and yet is behind the rest of America in job-growth.  In other words, Badger State subsidies to business and corporate interests represents the most unproductive corporate welfare system in America.

More…

Capitalism: A Good Word for a Bad Thing 1

By Kevin Carson

The Freeman editor Sheldon Richman, speaking at George Mason University, raised the question of just what mainstream libertarians mean when they call a country “capitalist.”  What qualifies a country as “capitalist”?

A lot of countries with relatively low indices of economic freedom (including those ranked as “mostly unfree”) are conventionally regarded as “capitalist,” and referred to as such in neoliberal agitprop comparing them favorably to non-capitalist countries like Cuba.  And the talking heads at CNBC and scribblers in the business press commonly refer to “our capitalist system,” even though it’s doesn’t even remotely approximate a free market.

More…

A Blueprint To Restore The Articles of Confederation 1

By Ron Holland

This is the fourth of the “12 Axioms of Freedom Restoration” set forth in my introductory article on this topic, “How to Restore the West.”

The restoration of America’s first and legitimate government will not be a quick or easy task but it is necessary if we are to survive as a free people and nation. While the US should, of course, retain both the Constitution and Bill of Rights, we must return to a decentralized confederation structure of government like Switzerland or Canada and add in the right of Swiss style referendums so citizens can terminate or initiate legislation when Congress fails to follow the will of the people.

While there have been many thoughtful and needed proposals about how we need to end the Fed, return to a gold backed currency, require term limits, repeal the 16th and 17th amendments to the Constitution, require a declaration of war for military action or a balanced budget and other changes, none of these will restore limited government or our republic. I agree with these ideals and many more but all will be ineffective if we retain the federal government structure in place now.

More…

Progressive Managerialists vs the Common Man Reply

by Bill the Butcher

“The world was full of cravens who pretended to be heroes” ―George R.R. Martin, Game of Thrones

Malcolm X holding an M1 Carbine

“Progressive” liberals fear the average gun owner, and, convinced of their superior moral quality, they want everyone else to fear gun owners, too.

But gun-fearing progressives are not exactly gun-hating saints. For instance, the Democratic Party’s leadership is guarded by guns, they sell assault rifles to Mexican drug cartels, our taxes for welfare programs are collected at gunpoint, and the progressive’s dinner was shot with a gun. More…

Can We Escape the Ruling Class? 1

By Roderick Long

Can We Escape the Ruling Class?“ was originally published in the Autumn 1994 issue of Formulations by the Free Nation Foundation, written by Roderick T. Long.

Nature of a Ruling Class

We tend to think of the “ruling class” as a Marxist concept; but the notion has a long history before Marx, particularly in the ancient Greek and Roman historians, and class analysis played a central role in 18th and 19th century classical liberalism as well. Whenever the decisions and actions of the political machinery are largely controlled by a particular group, and serve to advance the interests and reinforce the power of that group, such a group is properly called a ruling class. A ruling class is, obviously, a bad thing to have. This raises two questions:

  • How does a ruling class operate and maintain its power?
  • Is it possible to construct a political system that will not fall prey to a ruling class?
  • More…

A “Political” Program for Anarchists Reply

By Kevin Carson

The following article was written by Kevin Carson and published on his blog Mutualist.Org: Free Market Anti-CapitalismFebruary/August, 2002.

INTRODUCTION

In On Community, a recent pamphlet on Gustav Landauer, Larry Gambone suggested the need for an “antipolitical movement” to dismantle the state, in order to eliminate obstacles to non-statist alternatives. It was no longer possible, he argued, merely to act outside the state framework while treating it as irrelevant. To do so entailed the risk that “you might end up like the folks at Waco.” In an earlier work, Sane Anarchy, he suggested a few items for the agenda of such a movement. I now submit a list of my own (after a few pages of preferatory comment), as a basis for discussion.

More…

America Is Turning Into One Big Prison for People in Debt Reply

By Steve Fraser

Shakespeare’s Polonius offered this classic advice to his son: “neither a borrower nor a lender be.”  Many of our nation’s Founding Fathers emphatically saw it otherwise.  They often lived by the maxim: always a borrower, never a lender be.  As tobacco and rice planters, slave traders, and merchants, as well as land and currency speculators, they depended upon long lines of credit to finance their livelihoods and splendid ways of life.  So, too, in those days, did shopkeepers, tradesmen, artisans, and farmers, as well as casual laborers and sailors.  Without debt, the seedlings of a commercial economy could never have grown to maturity.

Ben Franklin, however, was wary on the subject. “Rather go to bed supperless than rise in debt” was his warning, and even now his cautionary words carry great moral weight.  We worry about debt, yet we can’t live without it.

More…

The “Death of Private Property”? Reply

By David D’Amato

A few days ago, I heard Greg Gutfeld — a self-styled libertarian and host of Fox News’ Red Eye — grieve the “death of private property” in his comment on homeless people squatting in Bank of America-owned houses. As a free marketer, defender of private property, and a libertarian, I’m always offended, or at the very least peeved, at the predisposition of ostensible libertarians like Gutfeld to make common cause with the likes of Bank of America, member of “the brotherhood of thieves who prey upon labor.” Given many self-identified libertarians’ instinctive reactions about private property, the subject is observably susceptible to all of the difficulties that attend hazy definitions and even more confused applications of the definitions we actually have.

More…

A Government of the Rich, by the Rich, and for the Corporations Reply

By John Whitehead

“The shaping of the will of Congress and the choosing of the American president has become a privilege reserved to the country’s equestrian classes, a.k.a. the 20% of the population that holds 93% of the wealth, the happy few who run the corporations and the banks, own and operate the news and entertainment media, compose the laws and govern the universities, control the philanthropic foundations, the policy institutes, the casinos, and the sports arenas.” ~ Journalist Lewis Lapham

The pomp and circumstance of the presidential inauguration has died down. Members of Congress have taken their seats on Capitol Hill, and Barack Obama has reclaimed his seat in the White House. The circus of the presidential election has become a faint memory. The long months of debates, rallies, and political advertisements have slipped from our consciousness. Now we are left with the feeling that nothing has really changed, nor will it.

This is not by accident. The media circus leading up to the elections, the name calling in the halls of Congress, the vitriol and barbs traded back and forth among people who are supposed to be working together to improve the country, are all components of the game set up by those who run the show. The movers and shakers behind these engaging, but ultimately trite, political exercises are the elite, the so-called upper class, who benefit from the status quo. This status quo is marked by an economic crisis with no end in sight, by the slow but steady growth of a police state aimed at the lowest rungs of society, and a political circus which keeps us enraptured long enough that we don’t question what’s really going on.

More…

Is America’s economic future hopelessly lost? 1

The Washington Times

HONOLULU, January 26, 2013 ― With national optimism now at a historical all-time low since the Carter Administration,  many are wondering whether or not America’s best days are behind us. Scarce  employment opportunities and rapidly rising costs of food and energy have made  life increasingly difficult for young and old alike.

For a perspective on the declining fortunes of America and what’s next for an  entire generation of young persons looking for both work and a sense of  self-value in the middle of the worst “recovery” in U.S. history, I sought out  economist and author Aaron Clarey.

Clarey, famously known to fans as “Captain Capitalism” from his highly popular blog, believes that there are “serious structural economic problems with the U.S. economy” and has published a new book entitled Enjoy the  Decline which tells readers how to brace for the coming time  of trouble. When I asked Clarey if he thought there was a D.C. policy  solution to this crisis, he told me that would involve serious reform to  entitlements such as Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid and constitutionally  eliminating corporate taxes – a therapy seen by many contemporary legislators as  so controversial that Clarey concedes “in other words, no, there’s no hope  whatsoever.”

More…