Who Owns America? Reply

It looks like Ralph might have been reading ATS.

By Ralph Nader

The American Conservative

illustration by Michael Hogue

illustration by Michael Hogue

There was a time in the Depression of the 1930s when conservative thought sprang from the dire concrete reality of that terrible era, not from abstractions.

They did not use the word “conservative” very often, preferring to call themselves “decentralists” or “agrarians.” Eclectic in background, they were columnists, poets, historians, literary figures, economists, theologians, and civic advocates. In 1936, Herbert Agar, a prominent author, foreign correspondent, and columnist for the Louisville Courier-Journal and Alan Tate, poet and social commentator, brought a selection of their writings together in a now nearly forgotten book: Who Owns America? A New Declaration of Independence.

In his 1999 foreword to the reissued edition, historian Edward S. Shapiro called Who Owns America? “one of the most significant conservative books published in the United States during the 1930s” for its “message of demographic, political, and economic decentralization and the widespread ownership of property” in opposition “to the growth of corporate farming, the decay of the small town, and the expansion of centralized political and economic authority.”

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Italy to add drug trafficking, prostitution to GDP figures Reply

Russia Today

Reuters/Yannis Behrakis

The Italian government will include revenue from drug traffic, prostitution and smuggling while calculating its gross domestic product (GDP) in a bid to boost its shaky economy.

Starting this October, Italy will include revenues from “the illegal activities: drug trafficking, prostitution and smuggling services (cigarettes or alcohol)” to its GDP, the country’s national statistics office said on Thursday.

“The methodology for estimating the economic dimension of these activities will be consistent with the guidelines established by Eurostat,” it added.

The move may add up to 2 per cent to Italy’s GDP, European Union’s statistical service, Eurostat, earlier predicted. This should bring the country’s new government under Prime Minister Matteo Renzi closer to its goal – reaching strong growth and lowering the public debt, which the EU says is now “the major challenge”.

The change in methodology initially comes from the EU, which back in January, set new rules forcing its member-states to track the value of all activities that produce income, including criminal activities like “production and consumption of drugs”, prostitution and black market alcohol and cigarette sales.

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Robert Stark Interviews Keith Preston Reply

The Stark Truth with Robert Stark.

This was recorded a few months back, but it’s a good one.

Listen here.

Robert Stark welcomes back Keith Preston of Attack the System. Topics include:

  • Keith’s article “Who am I? Left, Right, or Center”: https://attackthesystem.com/2014/02/21/who-am-i-left-right-or-center/
  • How his anti-imperialist views on foreign policy overlap with the far Left as well as Paleoconservative and New Right thinkers
  • How he finds his critique of capitalism often overlaps with both those of the far Left but also those of Catholic distributists and social nationalists on the far Right
  • How he shares some views on social issues with the Left, but swings back to the Right on decentralist, anti-statist or civil libertarian grounds
  • His support for regionalist and ethno-identitarian movements as a bulwark against imperialism and the Leviathan state
  • The cult of guilt by association versus intellectual freedom
  • Making a case against mass immigration to anarchists
  • His podcast “Who Are the Power Elite?”: https://attackthesystem.com/2013/12/30/attack-the-system-who-are-the-power-elite/
  • The difference between power elite analysis and conspiracy theories
  • Power elite analysis versus theories of democratic pluralism
  • How the power elite uses demographic, cultural, and class conflict to protect its own position of dominance
  • Robert Putnam’s book Bowling Alone and the concept of social capital
  • His podcast “Creating Alternative Infrastructure”: https://attackthesystem.com/2014/02/15/ats-roundtable-on-creating-alternative-infrastructure/

Keith Preston will be appearing on the Tom Woods Show today at 12 pm Eastern Reply

Be sure to tune in.

Welcome to The Tom Woods Show!
Join New York Times bestselling author Tom Woods every weekday at noon Eastern as he sets fire to the 3×5 card of conventional opinion with exciting guests and commentary. Listen live, or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!
Tom Woods Blogs

French National Front: Far right or hard left? 2

“The transformation of the Front from fringe group into France’s leading working-class party is not sudden. In the 1980s Jean-Marie Le Pen – the founder of the FN and the current leader’s father – targeted urban voters who were leaving the Communist Party in droves.

It was he who decided to hold the Front’s annual march on 1 May – the traditional Labour Day celebrated by trade unions. It is now by far the biggest event in Paris on that date.

Under Marine Le Pen, the drive to capture far-left votes has been extended to moderate socialists, says Guillaume Bernard from the Catholic Institute of Higher Studies.”

By Henri Astier

BBC News

Marine Le Pen at 1 May rally in Paris “The people first”

She inveighed against a “draconian policy of austerity” that favoured “globalised elites at the expense of the people”.

The speaker was not a left-wing firebrand, but the leader of the far-right National Front, Marine Le Pen. More…

French National Front’s black and Arab supporters 1

The Left has abandoned class-based politics in favor of the identity politics, therapeutism, and cosmopolitanism of the left-wing of the middle class, and that is encouraged by international capitalist elites. Because of this, the Left has become worthless at representing the interests of the poor and working class. I’ve predicted for some time that the radical right would step in to fill this void, and in the process the radical right would undergo a transformation of its own. Here it is.

By Henri Astier

BBC News

Black and brown faces are not a rarity at events of France’s National Front (FN) these days. Their presence may seem odd amid chants of “On est chez NOUS” (“This is OUR place”).

Why would these people support a right-wing, anti-immigration group like the FN?

To hear them, it is the most natural thing in the world.

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On the Myth of “Cultural Marxism” 30

Is PC the fault of the Frankfurt School, or capitalism?

By Michael Acuna

Common Ruin

America's cultural elite have been indoctrinated by sinister Marxists operating in academia... Or have they?

Across the paleoconservative blogosphere, on every “libertarian” forum and racist webpage, a strange concept is faulted for the turmoil witnessed in North America and Europe today, as well as for the alleged breakdown of Western social mores. ‘Cultural Marxism’ is the name these courageous right-wing dissidents have assigned this corrosive force.

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Can Left and Right Unite Once More? Reply

By Pat Buchanan

The American Conservative

Sage Ross /  cc

Last summer, in this capital of gridlock, a miracle occurred.

The American people rose as one and told the government of the United States not to drag us into another Middle East war in Syria. Barack Obama was ready to launch air and missile strikes when a national uproar forced him to go to Congress for authorization. Congress seemed receptive until some Hill offices were swarmed by phone calls and emails coming in at a rate of 100-1 against war. Middle America stopped the government from taking us into what even the president now concedes is “somebody else’s civil war.” This triumphal coming together of left and right was a rarity in national politics. But Ralph Nader, in Unstoppable: The Emerging Left-Right Alliance to Dismantle the Corporate State, believes that ad hoc alliances of left and right to achieve common goals can, should, and, indeed, shall be our political future.

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US Set to Become the Newest Third World Country 3

By Kerry Anne

Iacknowledge.Net

Aerial view of Detroit

The United States, the home of Capitalism, is about to demonstrate its ultimate failure, as the cannibalistic economic system consumes the nation’s economy from within.

The US economy is rigged toward the 1% of wealthiest citizens and corporations, this radically skews outcomes to the detriment of the economy as a whole.

As CJ Werlhman writes over at Alternet:

America has the most billionaires in the world, but not a single U.S. city ranks among the world’s most livable cities. Not a single U.S. airport is among the top 100 airports in the world. Our bridges, roads and rails are falling apart, and our middle class is being gutted out thanks to three decades of stagnant wages, while the top 1 percent enjoys 95 percent of all economic gains.

US income inequality is at its greatest for nearly a century and is rising, as the income gap between the bottom 90% and top 1% of Americans reaches its largest since 1928.  When compared globally, the US is the second most economically unequal society (behind Chile).  But what does economic inequality mean for average Americans?

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Political Successes and Lost Causes Reply

By Dr. Gary North

LewRockwell.Com/GaryNorth.Com

Today is a big day for me. It probably isn’t a big day for you, but it is a big day for me.

On this day, 40 years ago, the first issue of Remnant Review was mailed to subscribers. It was a technologically primitive newsletter. Most newsletters were, back in 1974. You can download it here.

I still publish it once a month, as you can see. Back then, I published it every other week. When it started, it had four pages. It grew to six pages. It grew to eight pages. Then, beginning early in this century, I ceased publishing it in paper form. From then on, it varied in length in terms of digits. There is no particular length for the issues.

I had left the Foundation for Economic Education in March 1973. I joined Ron Paul’s staff in June 1976. So these two years constituted my breakthrough. I began to escape the golden manacles of a salary. My escape came in the fall of 1979. After this, I was self-supported. I was a full-time entrepreneur. That began in the months leading up to May 1974.

A gold coin salesman and newsletter publisher named René Baxter persuaded me. I was attending an economics conference in early 1974. He asked me this: “Why don’t you start a newsletter?” There were lots of very good reasons, but I didn’t know them at the time. (Baxter soon joined the tax revolt movement, and he disappeared from public view.)

On May 15, 1974, my wife and I sat at a table in a rented house in Long Beach, California. She had typed names and addresses on sheets that served as masters for Avery peel-off labels. I got these photocopied at a local print shop. This was before Kinko’s.

I had about 300 free trial subscribers, as I recall. Then I converted about 20% of these to paid subscribers. But my memory is vague here. I may have had more than 300. I may have converted more than 20%.

I could not have guessed that, five and a half years later, I would have 22,000 subscribers at $60 a year.

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Liberal Civil War in San Francisco: Immigrants And Hipsters Attack Tech Workers 2

As I’ve been predicting. I lean towards the bus blockers on this one.

By Brenda Walker

VDARE.Com

may-day-2014Progressives in San Francisco are at war with themselves as anti-free market activists and immigrants are attacking – sometimes physically – the liberal but mostly white tech industry which funds the city. And though the rhetoric of the battle focuses on class, much of the conflict is being driven by the anti-white animus of Open Borders activists.

The hard Left in San Francisco is a mixture of anti-capitalist and anti-white sentiment. Thus, the demonstrators at May Day in the City by the Bay were not grizzled American workers fighting for high wages, but ethnic activists dressed like Aztecs and demanding amnesty. A poster for the day’s events, half in Spanish, pictured anti-American activists blocking a deportation bus. [Happy May Day, San Francisco, by Steven Jones, SF Gate, May 1, 2014] Mercifully, they limited themselves to blocking traffic, rather than the traditional Aztec practice of human sacrifice. [S.F. May Day rally ends with arrests, by Kale Williams, SF Gate, May 2, 2014]

 

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Why Libertarianism is a Joke 2

The Dangerous Times

Libyan Rebels celebrate village victory firing off AK47 shots as they ride out in convoy, 30 km from Bani Walid, on September 3, 2011. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)1

It’s not just that I think morality is non-cognitive and largely bad in most people, it’s that I think it’s useless to engage in. The struggle someone on the political and cultural fringes faces is not moral or intellectual – a matter of normative values or ideas – but physical. If we have the physical organization, including of course intangibles like network, influence, wealth, etc. we need not concern ourselves with the broken moralizing of herd animals or the cultivated ignorance of the creepy left: just as left-liberals don’t bother Chinese eugenicists, it isn’t because the Chinese won an argument, it’s because they will shoot liberal fruitloops who try to interfere.

This is also why I find the ‘libertarian movement’ to be tedious and ineffectual, despite broad sympathy with their ruling-class-annihilation schemes. The fact is that the masses are not educable, that their morality is not amenable to reality, and that libertarians can be as right as they want, if they’re not willing to fight the state they’re just not committed to libertarianism.

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“What is Liberal Democracy? Exploring a Problematic Term,” Reply

This is includes an extensive discussion of my book, Attack the System.

By Dr. Paul Gottfried

Defense.gov_News_Photo_110524-D-XH843-006_-_Secretary_of_Defense_Robert_M._Gates_addresses_the_audience_at_the_American_Enterprise_Institute_in_Washington,_D.C.,_on_May_24,_2011._ (1)

This essay was authored by Paul Gottfried for Nomocracy in Politics

As a young faculty member at Rockford College forty years ago, my divisional chairman, who was a devout Straussian, once told me that a faculty colleague did not believe in “liberal democracy.” I’ve no idea how my superior arrived at this discovery, but he was clearly incensed and felt “real enmity” for people who didn’t see any difference between “liberal democracy and other forms of government.” My superior also shared with me a text he was then working on that showed definitively that Marx “rejected liberal democracy.” The strange thing is that up until the moment I listened to these harangues, I had never encountered the term “liberal democracy” and when I first heard it used (at age thirty-one), I thought it was a reference to Democrats who had endorsed George McGovern.

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The War on Drugs: a war on the urban poor & minorties Reply

No surprises here. Think Progress writes:

From Porter’s perspective, drug-free zones remain because “at the end of the day, these questions boil down to politics. The school zones have their most impact in urban areas where the electorate is often poor and is often of color.”

Bridgeport is home to roughly 37,000 kids, a third of whom live below the poverty level. You can’t walk more than two blocks in the city without running into one of 37 public schools, four charter schools or five public housing buildings. Countless daycare centers are also housed inside commercial buildings or wedged into strip malls along busy highways. As a result, drug-free zones cover almost all of the city’s 16 square miles. Researchers at the Prison Policy Initiative found that 92 percent of the city’s residents live within an enhanced sentencing zone.

“Everywhere’s a school zone, so it doesn’t make a difference,” said Pernell Clemonts, who was charged with conspiracy to sell narcotics within 1500 feet of a school when he was 16 years old. Cops caught him with drugs in front of his apartment, which was half a mile from an elementary school.

Pope Francis Needs Distributism Reply

By Arthur W. Hunt III

The American Conservative

Late last year, when Pope Francis issued his first apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” much more was made of his utterances on economics and what he branded a globalization of indifference than his vision of evangelism for the Catholic faithful. Sarah Palin, a conservative evangelical, told CNN that the Pope surprised her, that his statements sounded “kind of liberal.” Rush Limbaugh said he was “befuddled” at the Pontiff’s remarks and then added, “This is pure Marxism coming out of the mouth of the Pope.” R.R. Reno pointed out in First Things that these knee-jerk reactions from the right were as inaccurate as the knee-jerk reaction from the left: The Pope is one of us—thank God!

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Has Chris Hedges Been Reading ATS? 15

He sure sounds like it. Hedges is an example of what a serious Left would look like, although he’s still obviously not as radical as ARV-ATS.

The Stark Truth: Robert Stark Interviews Keith Preston Reply

Listen to the interview at Counter-Currents.Com

Robert Stark welcomes back Keith Preston of Attack the System. Topics include:

  • Keith’s article “Who am I? Left, Right, or Center”: https://attackthesystem.com/2014/02/21/who-am-i-left-right-or-center/
  • How his anti imperialist views on foreign policy overlap with the far Left as well as Paleoconservative and New Right thinkers
  • How he finds his critique of capitalism often overlaps with both those of the far Left but also those of Catholic distributists and social nationalists on the far Right
  • How he shares some views on social issues with the Left, but swings back to the Right on decentralist, anti-statist or civil libertarian grounds
  • His support for regionalist and ethno-identitarian movements as a bulwark against imperialism and the Leviathan state
  • The cult of guilt by association versus intellectual freedom
  • Making a case against mass immigration to anarchists
  • His podcast “Who Are the Power Elite?”: https://attackthesystem.com/2013/12/30/attack-the-system-who-are-the-power-elite/
  • The difference between power elite analysis and conspiracy theories
  • Power elite analysis versus theories of democratic pluralism
  • How the power elite uses demographic, cultural, and class conflict to protect its own position of dominance
  • Robert Putnam’s book Bowling Alone and the concept of social capital
  • His podcast “Creating Alternative Infrastructure”: https://attackthesystem.com/2014/02/15/ats-roundtable-on-creating-alternative-infrastructure/

Unstoppable: The Emerging Left-Right Alliance to Dismantle the Corporate State Reply

Now this looks to be an interesting read.

Amazon.Com

Ralph Nader has fought for over fifty years on behalf of American citizens against the reckless influence of corporations on our society. At this pivotal political moment, Americans are more disillusioned with their political leaders than ever. Large majorities tell pollsters that big corporations have too much political power. The ever tightening influence of big business on the mainstream media, elections and our local, state and federal governments, have caused many Americans to believe they have no political voice.

The Only Thing Americans Worry About Less than Climate Change? Race Relations Reply

As I wrote back in 2003:

The issues that motivate those on the margins-radical environmentalism,  gun rights absolutism, racial nationalism, socialism, radical feminism, queer power, religious fundamentalism-mean nothing to most people. The ordinary citizen is concerned only with his own day to day business. His issues are unemployment, housing, taxes, health care, provisions for old age and education.(95) Some people may also have one or two social issues, like abortion or the environment, that they are interested in or have strong opinions about. Most Americans have received something of a libertarian education from the Jeffersonian strand of traditional American politics. For this reason, populist rhetoric denouncing “big government” resonates well with the commoner. A populist movement that combined both libertarian and socialist themes, without explicitly describing itself as such, would likely go over well with the broad American working class.

Philip Bump

The Wire

Image Associated Press
The Iditarod sometimes has more snow. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

According to Gallup, the only thing that Americans worry about less than climate change is race relations. Nice priorities, America.

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Michelle Alexander: Locked Out of America Reply

A good discussion of the growth of the police state and prison-industrial complex in the USA between Michelle Alexander and Bill Moyers.

Watch the video.

After civil rights lawyer Michelle Alexander published her book The New Jim Crow in 2010 on our dehumanizing system of incarceration, she ignited a national conversation about justice in America and sparked a movement. In her book, Alexander explores how the war on drugs, “get-tough” sentencing policies and racism has created a caste system similar to that of our segregationist past.

Since then, Alexander has traveled the country to meet advocates and everyday Americans working to end mass incarceration in America — home to 25 percent of the world’s prisoners, despite representing only five percent of the world’s population.

She tells Bill that she has seen a grassroots movement brewing in communities across the country, “There are enormous victories that are being achieved precisely because the people whom we have written off and viewed as disposable are reclaiming their voice, standing up, speaking out, organizing even as they struggle to survive.”