The Legacy of Margaret Thatcher Reply

By Dr. Sean Gabb

Much will be said over the next few weeks about the “achievements” of Margaret Thatcher. These will probably divide between Daily Mailish eulogies and Guardianesque whines. My own view is that she was a bad thing for England.

She started the transformation of this country into a politically correct police state. Her Government behaved with an almost gloating disregard for constitutional norms. She brought in money laundering laws that have now been extended to a general supervision over our financial dealings. She relaxed the conditions for searches and seizure by the police. She increased the numbers and powers of the police. She weakened trial by jury. She weakened the due process protections of the accused. She gave executive agencies the power to fine and punish without due process. She began the first steps towards total criminalisation of gun possession.

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The Thatcher Paradox Reply

By Justin Raimondo

The queen of the Anglosphere is dead. In death, as in life, there is no middle ground where Maggie Thatcher is concerned: leftists dance in the streets, celebrating her demise, while conservatives mourn the passing of the “Iron Lady.” The irony is that she was never guilty of the alleged crimes attributed to her by the former, just as she never really earned the approbations of the latter.

British leftists are dancing a jig because they believe Thatcher introduced the politics of “austerity,” victimized the poor, and was a relentless reactionary to the end: the truth is that her timid and gradualistic approach to dismantling the British welfare state failed, and failed spectacularly, as Murray Rothbard pointed out at the time here, here, and here. The “Thatcher revolution” had the same success rate as the “Reagan revolution,” i.e. it never succeeded in rolling back the advancing role of the State in British society, only in slowing its galloping onset to a brisk trot.

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McDonald’s want ad demands bachelor’s degree, two years experience for cashier 1

Washington Examiner

With colleges producing more graduates, and youth unemployment at a sky-high 11.5 percent, even landing a job selling Big Macs is getting competitive.

Consider: A job opening at a Massachusetts McDonald’s restaurant for a full-time cashier requires one to two years experience and a bachelor’s degree.

“Get a weekly paycheck with a side order of food, folks and fun,” offered McDonalds.

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The way our money moves: Cascadia defined by regional economy Reply

In a recent article published on Facts CoExist theoretical physicist Dirk Brockmann argues that state boundaries are often arbitrary and out of date, no longer representative of how we communicate or function as a modern society. By tracking dollar bills he has created a series of maps redrawing state borders by how our money moves, which more accurately portrays distinctive areas based on regional economy.
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The Conservative Catholic Anarcho-Pacifist Dorothy Day Reply

By Stephen Beale

DorothyDayShe lamented the encroachment of the state and the perils of the welfare system. She once compared abortion to genocide and the U.S. government to Nazi Germany. She cheered on income tax resisters, dismissed the benefits of the minimum wage, and worried about the decline of freedom in an increasingly bureaucratic society.

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Class vs. “Identity Politics,” Intersectionality, Etc.: Some General Observations Reply

By Kevin Carson

Those of us involved in various justice movements of the Left sometimes argue among ourselves as though the struggles for class, racial and gender justice existed in a zero-sum relationship.

Many people in the workers’ and economic justice movements complain — rightly so in my view — that “identity politics” in far too many cases became a substitute for class struggle, with racial and gender justice movements led by upper middle-class managerial-professional types focusing almost entirely on equal representation in the professions and boardrooms at the expense of economic justice. This approach is commonly derided as “black, female, etc., faces in high places.”

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Time to Create Community Councils Reply

For Immediate Release
Boggs Center to Nurture Community Leadership
March 25, 2013 – Day One of the Occupation of Detroit
Contact: Ron Scott & Shea Howell – 313-282-7669 – howell@oakland.edu

DETROIT, MI – Today is a sad day in Detroit. The usurpation of civic power by the State marks the end of the illusion that representative democracy has the capacity to secure the life, liberty and happiness of our people.

Grace Lee Boggs says, “It is time for the formation of a Detroit Council of Organizations which would include the City Council and all organizations working at the community level. This would be a place for discussion and struggle over direction. Each person should seize this time to do something positive in her/his neighborhood to create the beloved community. It is also time to read and discuss articles on revolution.”
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More People Have Access To Cellphones Than Toilets Reply

news.yahoo.com
Eric Pfeiffer, Yahoo! News

A new United Nations study has found that more people around the world have access to a cellphone than to a working toilet.

The study’s numbers claim that of the world’s estimated 7 billion people, 6 billion have access to mobile phones. However, only 4.5 billion have access to a toilet.

At a press conference announcing the report, U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson announced the organization is launching an effort to halve the number of those without access by the end of 2015. More…

The Economics of World Government Reply

by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

[Transcript of a speech delivered at the 2009 Mises University.]

At the beginning, I want to repeat a few points that I have made in my previous lecture on law and economics, and then I want to get to an entirely different subject than the one that I dealt with in that previous lecture.

Because there is a scarcity in the world, we can have conflicts regarding these scarce resources. And because conflicts can exist whenever and wherever there exists scarcity, we do need norms to regulate human life. Norms – the purpose of norms is to avoid conflicts. And in order to avoid conflicts regarding scarce resources, we need rules of exclusive ownership of such scarce resources or, to say exactly the same, we need property rights to determine who is entitled to control what and who is not entitled to control what. More…

Fewer Americans Than Ever Trust U.S. Government Reply

CBS DC

For Every 10 Americans, Only 3 Trust The Government

WASHINGTON (CBSDC) – The Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. has found that fewer Americans than ever trust the decisions made by the government.

Data collected from a survey taken in January of this year indicates that all demographics and partisan groups experienced an increasing lack of faith in government leadership, according to a release posted on the Pew Research website late last week. More…

The World of 2100 Reply

Interesting insights from Robert Kaplan

Ancient and medieval mapmakers would better understand the world of 2100 than would the politicians of 2000. Nations as we know them have existed for only a few hundred years. But cities have been with us since the dawn of civilization. And while the future of the city is not Robert D. Kaplan, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, is the author of “The Coming Anarchy,” a forthcoming book.

While the future of the city is not in doubt, modern nations will probably continue to weaken in the 21st century. By 2100, the organizing principle of the world will be the City-state, along with the urban radials of prosperity that follow major trade routes.

Indeed, loyalty toward the polis will gradually overwhelm the traditional state patriotism of the 20th century. Empires will be agglomerations of urban areas. Cities and their hinterlands will make alliances and fight wars with and against each other – less over territory than over bandwidths in cyberspace and trade privileges. Power politics will prove eternal.

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City-states are the Future? Reply

Trendsimwatching.com

Trend: Nation-states may be losing power to smaller entities as globalization sorts cultures into regions based on city-states.

VC Confidential describes a dinner talk by futurist Paul Saffo. Excerpts below.

Link: VC Confidential: A Global Evening with Paul Saffo

…our world is moving from one of nation-states to one of city-states. Rather than the future being one of the US versus China, it is going to be Silicon Valley vs Beijing or Chicago vs. Paris. Each dominant city will define its region. With the globalization of trade and the impact of the internet, people will identify both with the culture established by their city/region as well as with global, cross-border influences/factors such as Islam. With the “flattening” of the world, Chicago is no longer vying with US cities like New York for influence, commerce and jobs, but other major cities in the world.

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Farrakhan Urges Black Americans to Collectively Purchase Land, Use Gangs As Militias Reply

If only all leaders of resistance movements had the level of competence and vision as this man.

The Blaze

The Minister Louis Farrakhan, 79, delivered his annual Saviors’ Day sermon on Sunday. As is usually the case, the three-hour address covered a variety of topics ranging from current events to the faith leader’s contentious views on race relations. Of particular note was an economic plan he posited — one in which African Americans would come together to invest in land — and a pledge to reach out to gang leaders to ask them for assistance in protecting the Nation of Islam’s interests.

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Occupy Wall Street: Revolt of the Upper Middle Class? Reply

By Rad Geek

Last month there was a research report from Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce and Penny Lewis on the economic background of people who participated in some #OWS events in New York City. The New York Times and other press outlets picked up on one of the report’s findings — that More than a third of the people who participated in Occupy Wall Street protests in New York lived in households with annual incomes of $100,000 or more … and more than two-thirds had professional jobs. Over on Facebook, Thaddeus Russell’s quick commentary on the story was:

New York Times: In Occupy, Well-Educated Professionals Far Outnumbered Jobless, Study Finds

Thaddeus Russell: There has never been a political movement in the United States in which this wasn’t the case.

— Thaddeus Russell, near Los Angeles, CA., on Facebook (January 28, 2013)

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