You Musn’t Forget S-L-A-V-E-R-Y!!!!!! 1

In contemporary American political discourse, we often hear talk of “the legacy of slavery,” primarily in discussions of racial issues. To be sure, the “legacy of slavery” has had a damaging impact on American race relations (it wasn’t so wonderful for the actual slaves, either). Many of the rather severe social problems found among certain sectors of Americans of African ancestry today are often attributed to this legacy. I tend to think such claims are often overstated. For one thing, the overwhelming majority of American blacks are far from being the social or economic basket cases many people imagine them to be. As the black economist Dr. Walter Williams puts it:

If one totaled black earnings, and consider blacks a separate nation, he would have found that in 2005 black Americans earned $644 billion, making them the world’s 16th richest nation. That’s just behind Australia but ahead of Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland. Black Americans have been chief executives of some of the world’s largest and richest cities such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Gen. Colin Powell, appointed Joint Chief of Staff in October 1989, headed the world’s mightiest military and later became U.S. Secretary of State, and was succeeded by Condoleezza Rice, another black. A few black Americans are among the world’s richest people and many are some of the world’s most famous personalities. These gains, over many difficult hurdles, speak well not only of the intestinal fortitude of a people but of a nation in which these gains were possible. They could not have been achieved anywhere else.

Of course, there is another side to this question, primarily the ongoing gap in accumulated wealth between whites and blacks, and the even more serious problem of the enormous black “underclass.” I’m inclined to think these latter problems have broader and more recent causes, such as ongoing patterns of class conflict, repression, politically imposed hinderances to the economic self-advancement of blacks, and attacks on the organic community life of the lower classes by the state. Still, there’s no doubt the “legacy of slavery” contributes to the disproportional representation of blacks among the lower classes that are impacted most heavily by such things.

There’s still another way in which the “legacy of slavery” has damaged American politics, and that is the persistent identification of ideas like local sovereignty, community autonomy or political decentralization as code words for slavery or compulsory racial segregation of the kind associated with Jim Crow. For instance, in much of American higher education, the classical American republican doctrine of “states’ rights” is simply dismissed as an anachronism that never had any purpose other than to defend the interests of slave-holders. Having studied American history in an advanced academic setting, I’ve noticed the general tendency is to present the unfolding of American history as an evolutionary struggle towards the achievement of “progress,” meaning overcoming reactionary ideas like states’ rights, limited government and other impediments to the glorious victory of the federal welfare state and centralized micromanagement of local race relations. Joe Stromberg’s parody of a modern course in what used to be called Western Civilization, which can be viewed here, is only a slight exaggeration.

The obsession with slavery has corrupted not only political discourse in elite academic circles, and among mainstream “progressive” thinkers, but also among fringe radicals as well. For this reason, my Number One Fan Aster feels it necessary to place this item in the proposed constitution for her rendition of Utopia:

The principle applies to places not subject to the jurisdiction of the County of Bohemia too, but this isn’t an excuse to bomb foreigners and take their stuff. Or to get other foreigners to ruin their livelihoods so they have to work in your sweatshops for virtually nothing. It even applies to BROWN people, believe it or not- and the fact that it took you this long to figure that out means you suck.

Section VII. Aster shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Actually, anyone who wants to stop a slavery situation should feel empowered to do it. Figuring out the enforcement and incentive structures will be a bitch, though- but that’s not an excuse for giving up and just letting slavery happen, Keith.

Soviet Onion:

Aster has written some unwarranted misrepresentations of Keith (I prefer to think he enables fascists rather than being one himself) and even more of Jeremy, but this isn’t one of them. Consider Keith’s mission statement that he’s a single-issue activist looking to bring down the Empire and will work with everybody from Fascists to Stalinists to do that, so long as they’re willing to secede, go their separate ways and dominate their own territories once the job is done. If he’s so ecumenical that he’s willing to work with all these people, then why not also some small-scale secessionist group that ended up practicing slavery in their area? What would make them so special that, given his stated criteria, Stalinoids are OK but they’re not?

If you include authoritarian forms of parenting, education and marriage as forms of slavery, then those are cases where he does directly advocate slavery. Unfortunately, that just makes him like everybody else.

So should we “just let slavery happen”? First of all, where does contemporary slavery actually take place? Mostly in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. You know, the places where all of those supremely virtuous “people of color” tend to be found and who would have remained in the Garden of Eden if only those evil white European snake-devils hadn’t come along and fucked up their otherwise idyllic world. If only those evil white-devil slave traders hadn’t brought Africans to the Western hemisphere as slaves, perhaps their current descendents could enjoy living in the paradise of Nigeria, where seven percent of the population are still enslaved. Maybe the prosperous members of America’s black middle class (roughly seventy-five percent of American blacks) could even be in the oasis of Mauritania, where twenty percent of the population are still slaves. Of course, to their credit, the Mauritanians did pass an anti-slavery law in 2007. Who says they’re not progressive?

Do we need to “just let slavery happen?” No, a coalition of nations could invade the African continent and force the locals to free their slaves, in the style of U.S. Grant, Bill Sherman and Phil Sheridan. However, the only nations with the level of wealth and/or military power to even attempt such an effort (disaster though it would be) would be those of North America, Europe and Russia (plus the wild card of China). Problem is it’s mostly white folks who live in those nations. So a liberatory invasion of Africa and other slavery hotbeds seems to be off the table. Otherwise, we might be practicing European colonialism, or even white supremacy. Plus, it’s been done already. Wasn’t decolonialization supposed to be a “progressive” thing? So, yes, it looks like we do indeed need to “just let slavery happen.” Anything else might even be racist or white supremacist. Of course, we could assist those actual groups who really are doing something to oppose slavery in place like Africa. For instance, those groups who have actually purchased the freedom of Sudanese slaves. Problem is a lot these actually effective anti-slavery groups seem to be Christian in orientation, and we couldn’t endorse that, given that they are all no doubt frothing-at-the-mouth homophobes who express skepticism as to whether anal sodomy and/or rimming ought to be elevated to the level of sacramental rites, right along with eucharist, baptism and the last rites.

Actually, I don’t think we should be that hard on the African slave-holders. After all, they’re not so different from us white Americans of a mere 150 years ago. Plus, the slave-holders in places like Nigeria or the Sudan never got to go to U.S. or Western European public schools, receive multicultural education, or participate in “teaching tolerance” programs whose curriculum was designed by the Southern Poverty Law Center. So give them a break.

Of course, it is sometimes argued, though usually not by sensible people, that American-style antebellum slavery was of a particularly nasty variety, unlike the sunny and hedonistic kinds that existed in places like South America, Africa, China or the Islamic world. And while we would not want to impose Eurocentric Western values like slavery abolition on places like Africa (to do so would be racist), surely the recent ancestors of us white Americans, at least the enlightened ones from up North, should not have “just let slavery happen” in the states of the Old Confederacy? Africans enslaving Africans, Chinese enslaving Chinese, or Arabs enslaving Arabs might be something we can tolerate because, well, it just couldn’t be all that bad if “people of color” are doing it, but the idea of white American Southerners (and Christians, no less) enslaving Africans, well, that’s just, well, worse than awful, for some reason or another.

I reject the claims of modern day Confederate patriots that the U.S. Civil War had nothing to do with slavery and that it was all about tariffs, agriculture and states’ rights. However, I agree that the motivation of the Union was self-preservation rather than slavery abolition because, well, the President of the Union said so. Still, wasn’t the victory of the Union a victory for liberty? Yes, if we want to overlook the imposition of the draft in both the North and South during the course of the war, the killing of hundreds of thousands of people, and the maiming or displacement of millions more. Well, wasn’t it at least a victory for “anti-racism”? Well, not really, considering the next major military effort after the defeat of the Confederacy was the conquest of the Indian territories in the West. There’s also the thorny question of the fact that there were both Indians and blacks on both the Union and Confederate sides.

Then there’s the question of the impact of the Civil War on the future of American politics. The war marked the death of the old confederal republic and the creation of a centralized, Jacobin, nationalist regime and continental empire. If America had been split into two republics in the 1860s, the Wilson regime might not have entered World War One a half century later. It was American involvement in that war that led to the total destruction of Germany, the subsequent rise of Nazism, World War Two, the genocides that transpired during the war, the invention of atomic weapons, the Stalinist occupation of Eastern Europe, the Cold War, the nuclear arms race, the brush wars in Asia, the present day American world empire and other not-so-nice things. Indeed, the war for slavery abolition advocated by many of Lincoln’s abolitionist supporters would seem to be an example of the “armed doctrine” that Edmund Burke warned against. Of course, that does not mean that an actual guerrilla war against the Southern slaveholders of the kind advocated by the anarchist Lysander Spooner would not have been justified.

So back to Soviet Onion’s comments:

Consider Keith’s mission statement that he’s a single-issue activist looking to bring down the Empire and will work with everybody from Fascists to Stalinists to do that, so long as they’re willing to secede, go their separate ways and dominate their own territories once the job is done. If he’s so ecumenical that he’s willing to work with all these people, then why not also some small-scale secessionist group that ended up practicing slavery in their area? What would make them so special that, given his stated criteria, Stalinoids are OK but they’re not?

If you include authoritarian forms of parenting, education and marriage as forms of slavery, then those are cases where he does directly advocate slavery. Unfortunately, that just makes him like everybody else.

Aside from the fact that comparing “authoritarian” parenting, compulsory school attendance and marriage to chattel slavery does little except make others think that anarchism is a philosophy not suitable for anyone over the age of fifteen, there are certain significant qualifications that would need to be added for this to be an accurate description of my actual views. I am for the dissolution of the American regime into smaller, more manageable units. Presumably, America’s international empire would no longer be able to sustain itself. Those nations are that are now colonies, vassalages, or client-states of the U.S. would achieve their full independence. However they choose to organize themselves upon achieving independence is none of my business. If the Italians elect a representative of the fascist Italian Social Movement as mayor of Rome, or if the Venezuelans prefer Chavez as their leader, or if the Cubans fail to rise up against Castro as the Romanians did to Nicolae Ceausescu, then that’s none of Keith’s goddamn business.

The question of what political factions or ideologies, if any, should be excluded from a pan-secessionist alliance in North America is indeed an interesting one. While ideologies like Nazism and Stalinism are too alien to American political culture to ever become mass movements, it is possible small bands of such groups could carve out separatist enclaves for themselves. There could theoretically be autonomous urban neighborhoods run by skinheads, or rural compounds of neo-nazi survivalists, or communes organized by Stalinist or Maoist groups. Groups of this type could even hold fairly large tracts of land that would be their de facto private property. If such communities are entirely voluntary in their membership, then there can be no political objection to them on libertarian grounds. Of course, others might have aesthetic, moral or cultural objections. But that’s too bad.

In a case where, say, a Neo-Nazi or hard-core Communist group were to seize a wider city or town, I would say the degree to which such an effort should be challenged or recognized should depend on the circumstances. At bare minimum, I would want those who wished to leave to be given the chance to do so on a model similar to, say, the partitioning of India and Pakistan in 1947. If such requests were refused, should surrounding communities engage in military action against the offending community? Perhaps, or perhaps not, depending on the circumstances, potential costs of such an action, the degree of severity of the offense given, and the probably of victory by the self-appointed policemen.

Ironically, this debate has relevance to an issue that I have raised with anarchists and libertarians in the past, and it is an issue where I have never received a satisfactory answer. What about a scenario where a libertarian or relatively libertarian society, or a federation of anarchies, was threatened by domestic political movements of an authoritarian or totalitarian nature? The classic example of this is the Weimar liberal republic, where the center collapsed and the two largest political parties were Hitler’s NSDAP and the Stalinist KPD, with each of these maintaining their own private armies, and engaging in routine, violent streetfighting with each other. To what degree do such groups cease to be mere political organizations using their rights of association, free speech and right to bear arms and become outright domestic invaders? Would the broader alliance of citizen militias, mercenaries, guerrillas, paramilitaries, posses, gangs or whatever that would comprise the defense forces of an anarchist federation ever be justified in suppressing the activities of a group like the NSDAP or the KPD? I believe they would, if such groups grew large enough, powerful enough, disruptive enough or violent enough to pose a “clear and present danger” to the survival of the anarchist federation. There is no reason why a confederacy of anarchies should tolerate an insurgency by a Khmer Rouge or a Shining Path.

I’ve even made similar arguments concerning immigration. To what degree should a host society allow or tolerate immigration by persons demonstrating values or originating from societies whose values are hostile to those of the host society? What constitutes a legitimate demographic threat? Should a billion Chinese be able to migrate to the U.S. tomorrow if they so choose, irrespective of the wishes of the natives? Should liberal-Enlightenment or Greco-Roman Western nations accept immigration from theocratic Islamic societies unconditionally? I think not.  It would seem that political, economic and civilizational survival would be an issue that trumps the migratory rights of immigrants.

These are difficult questions, and appeals to rigid ideological formulations and overblown juvenalia do not help to answer them.

Updated News Digest April 26, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“Yes, something very ugly has surfaced in contemporary American liberalism, as evidenced by the irrational and sometimes infantile abuse directed toward anyone who strays from a strict party line. Liberalism, like second-wave feminism, seems to have become a new religion for those who profess contempt for religion. It has been reduced to an elitist set of rhetorical formulas, which posit the working class as passive, mindless victims in desperate need of salvation by the state. Individual rights and free expression, which used to be liberal values, are being gradually subsumed to worship of government power. . . . For the past 25 years, liberalism has gradually sunk into a soft, soggy, white upper-middle-class style that I often find preposterous and repellent. The nut cases on the right are on the uneducated fringe, but on the left they sport Ivy League degrees. I’m not kidding — there are some real fruitcakes out there, and some of them are writing for major magazines. It’s a comfortable, urban, messianic liberalism befogged by psychiatric pharmaceuticals.”

                                                                                                    -Camille Paglia

We Live in a Fascist State Gerald Celente interviewed by Russia Today

Putting the Bush Years on Trial by Alexander Cockburn

If Obama Were Not a Pawn of Wall Street and Corporate America by Thomas Naylor

Sovereignty Resolutions, Nullification and Tea Parties: Much Ado About Nothing by Thomas Naylor

The Tea Parties: A Step in the Right Direction? Richard Spencer and Jack Hunter

Secede and Survive: Prepare to be Overwhelmed by Secession by Carol Moore

Go to CNN and Vote on Secession (looks like the poll has closed)

Conservatives Are Evil by Ryan McMaken

Libertarianism vs “Libertarianism by Justin Raimondo

If Only Libertarians Had Cards, So They Could Be Taken Away by TGGP

Bay Area National Anarchists Participate in Cystic Fibrosis Walkathon (good work, comrades! good outreach and a good cause!)

Just How Big a Disaster is the American Military by Bill Lind

Why the State is Our Enemy Robert Higgs interviewed on C-Span

Does the New Class Oppress Traditional Religious Communities? by David R. Hodge

The National-Anarchist Litmus Test by Keith Preston

Too Small to Fail: The Wilhelm Roepke Solution to Our Economic Woes by Dermot Quinn

Secession, the Fed and Tomorrow Ron Paul interviewed by Lew Rockwell

War Socialism and National Bankruptcy by David Gordon

The Amazing Catholic Bullshit Generator by John Zmirak

PIGS Ambush Citizen in Milwaukee by William Norman Grigg

The Apologist by Pat Buchanan

A Storm in a Cup of Tea by Jack Hunter

The Real Tea Parties by Ilana Mercer

First They Came for the Fatties by Richard Spencer

On Nation and Nationalism by Matthew Roberts

The War on Family Farms by Richard Spencer

The Thin and Thick, the There and the Here by Razib Khan

Are Hierarchies Rational? by Francois Tremblay

Missing the Point on Secession by Rad Geek

A Match Made in Hell by Roderick Long

Government Spending is No Cure for Recession by Sheldon Richman

The Real Debate on Foreign Policy: Intervention vs Non-Intervention by Sheldon Richman

Dangerous Men in Uniform by Rad Geek

Tea and Sympathy by Roderick Long

Legal Purgatory and John Demjanjuk by Binoy Kampmark

Ten Years After Columbine: The Tragedy of Youth Continues by Henry A. Giroux

Drug War Persecution Continues by Fred Gardner

The American Empire Foreclosed? by Marc Engler

The FARC Can’t Dance by Belen Fernandez

Norman Finkelstein with Martin Indyk on Gaza 

Survivalists: Regular People Get Ready for the Worst 

Ex-President of Colombia Says America Should Decriminalize Drugs 

The Ultimate Reaping of What One Sows: The Reich-Wing Edition by Glenn Greenwald

The Republic Strikes Back by Bill Kauffman

Against All Flags by Jesse Walker

Bush’s Torturers by Justin Raimondo

When Torture Isn’t “Torture” by Thomas R. Eddlem

Reading the Case of Roxana Saberi by Henry Newman

Japan Pays Foreign Workers to Go Home from Global Business

The Dark Side of Dubai by Johann Hari

Murdering Police Scum 

The Europe Syndrome and The Last Man 

A Federalism Amendment to the Constitution? by Randy Barnett

End the Cuban Embargo! by Sheldon Richman

Keynesian Conservatives by Sheldon Richman

Direct Action Gets the Goods: Syndicalist Action Against Starbucks by Rad Geek

U.S. Militant Workers Union Formed: Workers Unite Beyond Left and Right! 

A Nation of Helpless Idiots by Karen De Coster

Fuck Single Mothers by Gavin McInnes

The Soul of Booker T. Washington by Dylan Hales

The Ghosts of Earth Day’s Past by Dylan Hales

Get In Touch With Your Inner Bigot by Robert Stacy McCain

Obama Plays Hamlet on Torture by Ray McGovern

The Torture Commission Trap by Michael Ratner

Deconstructing the Taliban by Fawzia Afzal-Khan

Torture, War and the Imperial Project by Chris Floyd

Unemployment Across the USA by Chris Wilson

Obama’s Afghan Plan: Fracturing the Antiwar Movement by Vijay Prashad

The Tyranny of Bad Economics by Dean Baker

White Privilege in the Americas by Aisha Brown and Dedrick Muhammed

A Reflection on the “Left” and My Arrest by Joaquin Cienfuegos

PC Gestapo Disrupts Meeting at UNC 

Man Sentenced to 10 Years for Defending His Home Against PIGS 

Man Arrested for Murder for Defending Property Against Masked Criminal 

Obama the Bubble Pricker by Tom Woods

Don’t Criticize the Somali Pirates by John Higgins

Why is there a Totalitarian Drug War? by Jacob Hornberger

Banning Black Cars: The Latest Eco-Insanity by L.K. Samuels

The American Police State vs Little Boys by Paul Craig Roberts

The Servants of the Reptilian State by William Norman Grigg

Economic Survivalists by Judy Keen

Harmanic Convergence  by Justin Raimondo

The Cuban Embargo is a Proven Failure by Michael Kinsley

Of Course It Was Torture by Gene Healy

The Obedience Circuit  by Francois Tremblay

Rather Than Say This Myself from Back to the Drawing Board

Torture by Sheldon Richman

Paul Krugman is Right About Something from Back to the Drawing Board

In Counting There Is Strength by Rad Geek

Don’t You Wish It Really Could Be This Way? from Back to the Drawing Board

Educrat PIGS Molest Little Girls by Rad Geek

Obama Positioning for Back Door Gun Control by Chuck Baldwin

Immigration Hitting American Workers Hard by Peter Brimelow and Edward S. Rubenstein

Is Sean Hannity Now Cool? No!! by Jack Hunter

Religion and Politics by Razib Khan

Free John Walker Lindh by Dave Lindorff

Are Democrats Afraid of Investigating Torture? by Jeremy Scahill

A Housing Crash Update by Mike Whitney

Obama and the Housing Crisis by Anthony DiMaggio

The Debt Looters by Greg Moses

Blowback in Pakistan by Stonewall

Marijuana Advocates See Tipping Point by Brian Montopoli

Matt Taibbi’s The Great Derangement a review

TV Military Analysts Are Paid Pentagon Shills  by Glenn Greenwald

The Crime That Cannot Be Wiped Away by Laurence Vance

Never Trust a Commie or a Conservative by Jeffrey Tucker

Our Economic Future Peter Schiff interviewed by Lew Rockwell

The Shamelessness of Jane Harman by Justin Raimondo

Newt’s Sword of Damocles by Gordon Prather

How to Deal with North Korea Doug Bandow interviewed by Scott Horton

On Somali Piracy Jesse Walker interviewed by Scott Horton

Obama’s Foreign Policy Ron Paul interviewed by Scott Horton

Obama’s First 100 Days: Give Him a “D” by Ivan Eland

Soldier Killed Herself After Refusing to Take Part in Torture by Greg Mitchell

Why I Am an Anarcho-Pluralist 19

Over the last few days, there’s been an interesting discussion going on over at the blog of left-libertarian philosopher Charles Johnson (also known as “Rad Geek“). I’ve avoided posting there, due to the presence of an individual who has declared themself my mortal enemy (a role I’m happy to assume), but the subject matter of the discussion provides a very good illustration of why any sort of libertarian philosophy that demands a rigid universalism cannot work in practice. A poster called “Soviet Onion” remarks:

It seems that both social anarchism and market libertarianism have respectively come to adopt forms of collectivism typical of either the statist left or right. That’s a result of the perceived cultural affinity they have with those larger groups, and partly also a function of the fact that they appeal to people of different backgrounds, priorities and sentiments (and these two factors tend to reinforce each other in a cyclical way, with new recruits further entrenching the internal movement culture and how it will be perceived by the following generation of recruits).

On the “left” you have generic localists who feel that altruism entails loyalty to the people in immediate proximity (they’ll unusually use the term “organic community” to make it seem more natural and thus unquestionably legitimate). Most of them are former Marxists and social democrats, this is simply a way to recast communitarian obligations and tacitly authoritarian sentiments under the aegis of “community” rather than “state”. This comes as an obvious result of classical anarchism being eclipsed as THE radical socialist alternative by Leninism for most of the twentieth century. Now that it’s once again on the rise, it’s attracting people who would have otherwise been state-socialists, and who carry that baggage with them when they cross over.

On the “right”, it’s a little more straightforward. Libertarians have adopted the conservative “State’s Rights” kind of localism as a holdover from their alliance with conservatives against Communism, to the point that it doesn’t even matter if the quality of freedom under that state is worse than the national average, just so long as it’s not the Federal Government. And with this, any claim to moral universality, or the utilitarian case for decentralism go right out the window. Like true parochialism, it hates the foreign and big just because it is foreign and big.

That’s also one of the reasons why I think there’s a division between “social” and “market” anarchists; they each sense that they come from different political meta-groups and proceed from a different set of priorities; the established gap between right and left feels bigger than the gap between they and statists of their own variety. And the dogmatisms that say “we have to support the welfare state, workplace regulations and environmental laws until capitalism is abolished” or “we should vote Republican to keep taxes down and preserve school choice” are as much after-the-fact rationalizations of this feeling as they are honest attempts at practical assessment.

The problem with left-libertarianism (or with the 21st century rebirth and recasting of 19th century individualism, if you want to imperfectly characterize it that way), is that instead of trying to transcend harmful notions of localism, it simply switches federalism for communitarianism. It does this partially as a attempt to ingratiate itself to social anarchists, and partly because, like social anarchists, it recognize that this idea is superficially more compatible with an anti-state position. But it also neglects the social anarchists’ cultural sensibilities; hence the more lax attitude toward things like National Anarchism.

These are some very insightful comments. And what do they illustrate? That human beings, even professed “anarchists,” are in fact tribal creatures, and by extension follow the norms of either their tribe of origin or their adopted tribe, and generally express more sympathy and feel a stronger sense of identification with others who share their tribal values (racism, anti-racism, feminism, family, homosexuality, homophobia, religion, atheism, middle class values, underclass values, commerce, socialism) than they do with those with whom they share mere abstractions (“anarchy,” “liberty,” “freedom”).

Last year, a survey of world opinion indicated that it is the Chinese who hold their particular society in the highest regard, with 86 percent of Chinese expressing satisfaction with their country. Russians expressed a 54 percent satisfaction rate, and Americans only 23 percent. Observing these numbers, Pat Buchanan remarked:

Yet, China has a regime that punishes dissent, severely restricts freedom, persecutes Christians and all faiths that call for worship of a God higher than the state, brutally represses Tibetans and Uighurs, swamps their native lands with Han Chinese to bury their cultures and threatens Taiwan.”

Of the largest nations on earth, the two that today most satisfy the desires of their peoples are the most authoritarian.”

What are we to make of this? That human beings value security, order, sustenance, prosperity, collective identity, tribal values and national power much more frequently and on a deeper level than they value liberty. Of course, some libertarians will likely drag out hoary Marxist concepts like “false consciousness” or psycho-babble like “Stockholm syndrome” to explain this, but it would be more helpful to simply face the truth: That liberty is something most people simply don’t give a damn about.

The evidence is overwhelming that most people by nature are inclined to be submissive to authority. The exceptions are when the hunger pains start catching up with them and their physical survival is threatened, or when they perceive their immediate reference groups (family, religion, culture, tribe) as being under attack by authority. We see this in the political expressions of America’s contemporary “culture wars.” During the Clinton era, many social or cultural conservatives and religious traditionalists regarded the U.S. regime as a tyranny that merited armed revolt. During the Bush era such rhetoric disappeared from the Right, even though Bush expanded rather than rolled back the police state. Meanwhile, liberals who would denounce Bush as a fascist express polar opposite sentiments towards the Obama regime, even though policies established by Bush administration have largely continued. So how do we respond to this? Soviet Onion offers some suggestions:

The proper position for us, and what could really set us apart from everyone and make us a more unique and consistent voice for individualism in the global Agora, is to recognize all cultures as nothing more than memetic prisons and always champion the unique and nonconforming against the arbitrary limitations that surround them, recognizing their destruction as barriers in the sense of being normative. And to that end there’s the instrumental insight that the free trade, competition, open movement and open communication are forces that pry open closed societies, not by force, but by giving those who chafe under them so many options to run to that they make control obsolete, and thus weaken control’s tenability as a foundation on which societies can reasonably base themselves. Think of it as “cultural Friedmanism”: the tenet that open economies dissolve social authority the same way they render political authority untenable.

THAT’s what left-libertarianism needs to be about, not some half-baked federation of autarkic Southern towns filled with organic farms and worker co-operatives. It can still favor these things, but with a deeper grounding. It doesn’t ignore patriarchy, racism, heterosexism, but opposes them with a different and more consistent understanding of what liberation means.

But how far should our always championing of the “unique and nonconforming” go? If, for instance, a group of renegades happen to show up at the workers’ cooperative one day and commandeer the place, should we simply say, “Hell, yeah, way to go, noncomformists!” As for the question of the “Big Three” among left-wing sins (“racism, sexism and homophobia”), are we to demand that every last person on earth adopt the orthodox liberal position on these issues as defined by the intellectual classes in post-1968 American and Western Europe? Why stop at “patriarchy, racism and heterosexism”? Soviet Onion points out that many “left-wing” anarchists do not stop at that point:

I used to be an anarcho-communist. Actually, I started out as someone who was vaguely sympathetic to mainstream libertarianism but could never fully embrace it due to the perceived economic implications. I eventually drifted to social anarchism thanks to someone who’s name I won’t mention, because it’s too embarrassing.

After hanging around them for a while I realized that, for all their pretenses, most of them were really just state-socialists who wanted to abolish the State by making it smaller and calling it something else. After about a year of hanging around Libcom and the livejournal anarchist community, I encountered people who, under the aegis of “community self-management”, supported

  • smoking and alcohol bans
  • bans on currently illicit drugs
  • bans on caffeinated substances (all drugs are really just preventing you from dealing with problems, you see)
  • censorship of pornography (on feminist grounds)
  • sexual practices like BDSM (same grounds, no matter the gender of the participants or who was in what role)
  • bans on prostitution (same grounds)
  • bans on religion or public religious expression (this included atheist religions like Buddhism, which were the same thing because they were “irrational”)
  • bans on advertisement (which in this context meant any free speech with a commercial twist)
  • bans on eating meat
  • gun control (except for members of the official community-approved militia, which is in no way the same thing as a local police department)
  • mandatory work assignments (ie slavery)
  • the blatant statement, in these exact words, that “Anarchism is not individualist” on no less than twelve separate occasions over the course of seven months. Not everybody in those communities actively agreed with them, but nobody got up and seriously disputed it.
  • that if you don’t like any of these rules, you’re not free to just quit the community, draw a line around your house and choose not to obey while forfeiting any benefits. No, as long as you’re in what they say are the the boundaries (borders?) of “the community”, you’re bound to follow the rules, otherwise you have to move someplace else (“love it or leave it”, as the conservative mantra goes). You’d think for a moment that this conflicts with An-comm property conceptions because they’re effectively exercising power over land that they do not occupy, implying that they own it and making “the community” into One Big Landlord a la Hoppean feudalism 🙂

So I decided that we really didn’t want the same things, and that what they wanted was really some kind of Maoist concentration commune where we all sit in a circle and publicly harass the people who aren’t conforming hard enough. No thanks, comrade.

These left-wing anarchists sound an awful lot like right-wing Christian fundamentalists or Islamic theocrats. Nick Manley adds:

I have encountered an “anarchist” proponent of the draft on a directly democratic communal level.

Of course, we also have to consider all of the many other issues that anarchists and libertarians disagree about: abortion, immigration, property theory, economic arrangements, childrens’ rights, animal rights, environmentalism, just war theory, and much, much else.  We also have to consider that anarchists and libertarians collectively are a very small percentage of humanity. Nick Manley says:

I spend more time around libertarians then left-anarchists — although, I briefly entered “their” world and sort of know some of them around here. I was a left-anarchist at one time, but I no longer feel comfortable with the hardcore communalism associated with the ideology. I don’t really want to go to endless neighborhood meetings where majorities impose their will on minorities. I also would agree with Adam Reed that it’s naive to imagine such communes being free places in today’s world — perhaps, this is less true of New Zealand.

The list of things supported by anarcho-communists posted by Soviet Onion confirms my fears about village fascism posturing as “anti-statism”. I frankly do just want to be left alone in my metaphorical “castle” — I say metaphorical, because I am not an atomist and don’t live as such. I will engage in social activities, but I will not allow someone to garner my support through the use of force or do so to others. Like Charles, I have a strong emotional and intellectually principled revulsion to aiding the cause of statism in any way whatsoever. I’d be much happier being at some risk of death from handguns then in enforcing laws that harm entirely well intentioned peaceful people. This is not a mere political issue for me. I know more than a few people with guns who deserve no prison time whatsoever — one of them has guns affected by the assault weapons ban.

I honestly see a lot of principled parallels between conservative lifestyle tribalism and left-liberal lifestyle tribalism. Oh yes: there are contextual inductive distinctions to be made. A gun is not the same as homosexuality. The collectivist dynamic is still the same. Gun owners become no longer human in sense of rational beings. All of contemporary politics seems to be one thinly veiled civil war between fearful tribalists.

It would appear that tribalism is all that we have. I have been through a long journey on this question. I was a child of the Christian Right, drifted to the radical Left as a young man, then towards mainstream libertarianism, then the militia movement and the populist right, along the way developing the view that the only workable kind of libertarianism would be some kind of pluralistic but anti-universalist, decentralized particularism. Rival tribes who are simply incompatible with one another should simply have their own separatist enclaves. This concept is explained very well in a video series beginning here. Unlike the other kinds of libertarianism, there is actually some precedent for what I’m describing to be found in past cultures. See here and here. As Thomas Naylor remarks:

Conservatives don’t want anyone messing with the distribution of income and wealth. They like things the way they are. Liberals want the government to decide what is fair. Liberals believe in multiculturalism, affirmative action, and minority rights. Conservatives favor states’ rights over minority rights.

What liberals and conservatives have in common is that they are both into having—owning, possessing, controlling, and manipulating money, power, people, material wealth, and things. Having is one of the ways Americans deal with the human condition—separation, meaninglessness, powerlessness, and death. To illustrate how irrelevant the terms “liberal” and “conservative” have become, consider the case of Sweden and Switzerland, two of the most prosperous countries in the world.

Sweden is the stereotypical democratic socialist state with a strong central government, relatively high taxes, a broad social welfare net financed by the State, and a strong social conscience. Switzerland is the most free market country in the world, with the weakest central government, and the most decentralized social welfare system. Both are affluent, clean, green, healthy, well-educated, democratic, nonviolent, politically neutral, and among the most sustainable nations in all of history. By U.S. standards, they are both tiny.

Switzerland and Sweden work, not because of political ideology, but rather because the politics of human scale always trumps the politics of the left and the politics of the right. Under the politics of human scale, a politics that trumps our now-outdated and useless “liberal-versus-conservative” dualistic mindset, there would be but one fundamental question:

“Is it too big?”

It would seem that contemporary America is precisely the place to build a movement for this kind of decentalized particularism, a huge continent wide nation with many different cultures, religions, subcultures, ethnic groups and growing more diverse all the time, and where political and economic polarization is the highest it has been in over a century, and where dissatisfaction with the status quo is almost universal.

My challenge to anarchists, libertarians, communitarians, conservatives, radicals and progressives alike would be to ask yourself what kind of community you would actually want to live in, and where and how you would go about obtaining it. For instance, the geography of the culture war typically breaks down on the basis of counties, towns, precincts, municipalities and congressional districts rather than states or large regions. So why not envision forming a community for yourself and others in some particular locality that is consistent with your own cultural, economic or ideological orientation? The Free State Project, Christian Exodus, Second Vermont Republic, Green Panthers and Twin Oaks Commune are already doing this.

Political victory in the United States is achieved through the assembling of coalitions of narrow interest groups who often have little in common with one another (gun toting rednecks and country club Republicans, homosexuals and traditional working class union Democrats). Imagine if a third force emerged in U.S. politics whose only unifying principle was a common desire to remove one’s self and one’s community from the system. The only thing anyone has to give up is the desire to tell other communities what to do.

ATS Book Review: Ken MacLeod's "The Execution Channel" Reply

by Peter Bjorn Perls

Ken MacLeod is one of the better Science Fiction authors of this day. He is best known, I think, for his “Fall Revolution” quarilogy consisting of the books The Star Fraction, The Sky Road, The Stone Canal and The Cassini Division, which were released between 1995 and 1999, in which he manages to produce a fantastically fresh blend of science fiction and  political exploration, with an unexpected quality: It does not preach ideology. (I will review his other works at a later time).
Political science fiction is the staple of MacLeod, and The Execution Channel continues on that path. In this, the book does not take place in 2040 and onwards, but quite a bit closer to our current point in time. Even though no “present day” dates are mentioned, by my reckoning it takes place just before 2020.
The setting is an Earth where the War on Terror rages on with no end in sight, this time, the Coalition peace keepers moved North from Afghanistan into central Asia on the nexus between several factions and states: Tien Shan, squeezed between Russia, China, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Closer to home, with the pace of technological progress continuing apace (and i might add, a continually deteriorating degree of accountability of the powers that be), the fact of life circa 2020 in England, and presumably much of the world, is video surveillance of all roads and street corners, and mobile phones being so cheap that they have reached the point of disposability (paid for with Euros), but society still seems dominated by use of automotive transportation and the associated fossil fuel use. The US has an increased presence in Britain, it seems, though mostly confined to the military bases around the country. Everything else is much the same, even the cultural/religious/racial tensions in the ghettos, (in the UK, notably Bradford), and Google is still the centerpiece in people’s life on the internet.
Where the world differs from What We Know is that the Cold War is back of sorts: Russia and China are both rising back to superpower status, and they are anti-Western with a vengeance. The latter has aligned itself with North Korea, the former with… France.
The wellspring of the difference between this world and the one we know, is (Ken really chose his ideas tongue-in-cheek!) the contested US Election of 2000. Yes, G.W. Bush never made it to office – Al Gore did. In 2001 when Al is at work, a memo lands on his desk, stating that Al Queda intends to strike the US, so he goes into action and launches a volley of cruise missiles at Afghanistan. The result is lots of civilian casualties, and a popular backlash which in the story is what galvanizes the AQ to perform the 9/11 attacks. All which this goes on with Gore becoming a Democratic War President, Bush is relegated to authoring a book about the foolishness of US military adventures in foreign countries. With this digression I’m pointing out that MacLeod has a talent for making political satire from juxtapositions and keen observations of facts of history and ideology that will make you laugh out loudly. With the repeated pokes at vocal political groups (particularly those that tend to whine loudly), MacLeod uses both wit and sarcasm to full effect.
The core of the dramatis personae is the Travis family: The son Alec in the peacekeeping forces in Central Asia, the daughter Roisin who is a peacenik that as the novel takes off, has spent the last 6 months in a peace protest camp outside a Scottish air force base (RAF Leuchars, north of Edinburgh), and the father, James, is a government software contractor with ties to foreign intelligence agencies. The barrel of blackpowder couldn’t be more obvious!
What happens on what is later termed the 5/5 attack (the morning the 5th of May, 2000-something), is that the Leuchars base is hit by a low yield nuclear weapon. Roisin is tipped off of this by her brother (who despite being separated from his family by thousands of kilometers is still tied into the story) flees with the fellow peace protesters, and then it all starts: Britain is struck by a volley of bombings on important infrastructure points, and from there on, the ball rolls; international tension, since the reasoning goes that it’s one of the other nuclear powers that did it, and domestic chaos as the state comes down on everyone who gets out of line, at the same time as popular suspicion Al Queda intervention results in attacks on Muslims all over Britain. Yep, MacLeod certainly knows what contemporary strings to play.
The two dark horses of the story are: First, that the governments of the world use farfetched conspiracy theories to distract political dissenters toward unproductive pursuits (namely UFO scheming instead of aiming for the unaccountable political powers, which is MacLeod’s stab at the conspiracy buffs), second, that these governments also run secret detention centers around the world (which is already commonplace knowledge) where brutal executions take place, and somehow footage from these executions make it to the public on a broadcast channel that gives the book its title: The Execution Channel. In MacLeod’s world, you don’t have to go to 4chan.org anymore for your filth and atrocities, it’s right on your TV set!
Now, closing on the verdict of the book. Is it any good? My answer is that that It Depends.
I got it in the mail yesterday morning, and after having performed the chores of the day, I started reading it in the late afternoon. In doing so, I surprised myself by doing something I haven’t done, by my count, in 13 years: I read a book cover-to-cover in under a day, more specifically in under 13 hours, including dinner, two bathroom breaks, a shower, checking my email once, and a 15 minute rest. The book is a page-turner is the real sense of the word, and even though it is not that long (some 360 pages), the feat of blazing through it makes me wonder, writing this.
The book IS good, very much so. The blend of science fiction and fringe politics with a plausible near-future descent into dystopia is dynamite, and MacLeod knows how to execute it well. But here comes the caveat: It is the first 300 or so pages are good, whereafter the terrible happens: The story fizzes out, and plods along with late story development (decay may be a better word for it, though) of little substance, and to me it was as if MacLeod throws so much stuff into his literary blender that it becomes an uninteresting gray smudge, where only the earlier parts of the book pressures you on the back to keep on reading. I’ll have to agree completely with a number of Amazon UK reviewers: The last few (six, to be precise) pages of the book drops it all on the floor with the introduction of a non sequitur and of such silliness that it’ll make you moan loudly. (I know that I did.)
On closing the book after 4 o’clock in the morning, I got the feeling that Ken MacLeod had performed, in the terms of the British, a massive piss take on his readers. That, or he ran out of ideas at page 330, and had a ghostwriter with no feel for the story and no sense of remorse in butchering the potential of it all, finish it for him. A T.S. Elliot quote on the book ending here would be appropriate.
So, to repeat, if the book is good overall depends, on whether you tear out the last 60 pages of it before you read it, and dream up your own ending. If you do, it’s just about a 5-star read. Including the ending into the verdict, I wouldn’t even rate the book mediocre, but instead poor.
Of criticism of the story before the abysmal finish, I can offer some. For example, the title topic of the book, the Execution Channel, only has a significant presence early in the book, and after the first fourth or so, it disappears from view, only to make a single significant reappearance toward the end. I won’t go into spoilers, but suffice to say that the author wasted a  massive potential story element by not using what is drives the Execution Channel. This is unforgivable.
Second, while the portrayal of the apprehension of one of the book’s characters on Terrorism charges makes the small hairs at the back of your neck stand up, the long-run portrayal of the government agents that do this and other things, becomes far too monotonous and in the end (especially the aforementioned dreadful last 50-60 pages) they appear like robotic constructs that just keep doing what they’ve always done to finish off the story (even though the idea the some government employees are unfeeling automatons may be appropriate, but I digress…).
So. If you are already a MacLeod fan, they book is worthwhile reading, but to repeat, beware the ending. As for me, i’ll think twice about buying his books in the future. As much as I want the intensity and intricacy of his works of the 90’s to keep on coming, I’m afraid that a book like the one reviewed here signals that he has is past his peak, and do no care enough about the stories (and thus, his readers) he weave, to round it off in a graceful manner that doesn’t insult the audience.
*** END

Updated News Digest April 5, 2009 Reply

Quotes of the Week:

“I read the Social Democratic newspapers. I saw their disgusting attitude towards anything that bore even the slightest revolutionary character, and I realized that there could be no reconciliation between a revolutionary party and a party trying to earn a reputation for ‘moderation’ in the eyes of the government and the bourgeoisie.”

                                                                                 -Peter Kropotkin

States Rebellion Pending by Walter Williams

David Allan Coe: American Rebel by Will Forbis

“The FARC Think These Americans Are Pussies” by Christina Oxenberg

Tory Hacks Give Lip Service to Localism and Communitarianism by Sasha Issenberg (thanks Ean!)

911 Truths by Jack Hunter

On Loving to Hate the South by Paul Gottfried

Globomoney by Richard Spencer

Conspiracy Theories by Dylan Hales

Obama’s Attack on the Middle Class by Paul Craig Roberts

Is Notre Dame Still Catholic? by Pat Buchanan

Terror Begins At Home by Philip Jenkins

Neocon Obama Fans by Harrison Bergeron 2

Saint Wal-Mart? by Roderick Long

Patri Friedman on Seasteading (hat tip to Kevin Carson)

Open Source Health Care

Hollywood’s Democratic-Capitalist Self Censorship by Francois Tremblay

Which Politician Came Up With the Idea That Dying for Your Country is a Good Thing? by Sheldon Richman

They Really Give Nobel Prizes Away Like Candy These Days by Paul Krugman

R.I.P. Burt Blumert (1929-2009) by Wally Conger

Sheldon Richman on Arkansas Public TV 

Libertarian Essays by Roy Halliday 

All Hail Tax Resistance! from The Picket Line

Lessons from the Gulag Archepelago from The Picket Line

Virginia: Human Rights Abuses at Red Onion Supermax Prison 

UK: Protests Against Capitalism and the G20 

More Reasons To Be Against Happiness by TGGP

Early Mormon Cooperative Economics (thanks Chris!)

Barack of Kabul by Eric Margolis

Explaining the Boom and the Bust by Bob Murphy

Newsweek Actually Tells the Truth for Once? by Glenn Greenwald

End the War on Drugs by Ron Paul

We’re On the Edge of the Abyss by Peter Schiff

Burt Blumert: Liberty’s Benefactors by Lew Rockwell

Here Come the Food Police by Vin Suprynowicz

Fiat Money and Inflation by Chris Clancy

Civil War by Bill Bonner

The Obamamites Go to War by Justin Raimondo

To Reduce Violence, End the Drug War by Justin Raimondo

Stop Arming Israel by Philip Giraldi

Yes, We Have No Bananastan by Jeff Huber

Another Lost War? by William S. Lind

U.S. Cries Wolf Over China? by David Isenberg

National Anarchist-Syndicalist Union 

Leftism 101 by Lawrence Jarach

Prospects for Global Depression and Unrest by John Robb

Oppose Internet Censorship from National-Anarchists Australia/New Zealand

A New Global Debt Crisis by Nicholas Dearden

The Obama Betrayal by Dave Lindorff

“We’ll Make You See Death” by Joanne Mariner

Obama’s Pakistan Gambit by Ron Jacobs

Economic Inequality: The Foundation of the Racial Divide? by Dedrick Muhammad

What Next in Afghanistan? by Patrick Cockburn

Where’s All the Money Coming From? by Ralph Nader

Obama Bombs by Ray McGovern

Syria Calling by Seymour Hersh

The New Far Right Philo-Semitism 

Is Angelina Jolie Bad for Africa? 

“I’m Having a Very Good Crisis,” says George Soros 

The New American Interviews Antiwar.Com’s Eric Garris Part I Part II

What Is the State? by Lew Rockwell

Civil Unrest, Ghost Malls and Another American Revolution Interview with Gerald Celente

The Role of Government in a Free Society Lecture by Walter Williams

Asshole PIG Resigns 

Minneapolis PIGS Plant Gun on Teen After Murdering Him 

Mexico Has a U.S. Problem, Not a Drug Problem by Fred Reed

Blessed Are the Warmakers? Laurence Vance interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Neocon Victimology by Glenn Greenwald

Why Do PIGS Kills Dogs? by J.D. Tuccille

Guns, Gold, Secession by Karen De Coster

New World Disorder by Gary North

Dead Banks Walking by Lila Rajiva

The Scam of Political Representation by Gerard Casey

The Outlook for the Dollar Peter Schiff interviewed by Eli Neusner

Collapse: The Dollar’s Destination by Mike Rozeff

It’s All A Conspiracy! by Richard Spencer, Dylan Hales and Jack Hunter

Catholics and the Left John Zmirak interviewed by Richard Spencer

The Green Revolution Saved Lives? by Kevin Carson

The New Proudhon Library from Shawn Wilbur

John Taylor Gatto: State-Controlled Consciousness from Francois Tremblay

Tax Day Protests Planned from The Picket Line

Sheldon Richman on the Financial Crisis from Social Memory Complex

Affluenza and the Economic Meltdown of America by Thomas N. Naylor

Will There Be Anarchy After the 1930s? 

Modesto Citizens Retaliate Against PIGS 

Carter Conservatism by Sean Scallon

Obama and the Ruling Class  by David Macaray

Assassination Attempt Against St. Louis Green Party Leader by Don Fitz

Surging Further Into the Afghan Abyss by Chris Floyd

Dershowitz Encounters a Worrying Future by Michael Scheuer

Mandatory National Service on the Way? James Bovard interviewed by Scott Horton

The Truth About Guantanamo Lawrence Wilkerson interviewed by Scott Horton

Repeating Vietnam War Errors in Afghanistan by Matt Steinglass

How Do We Save NATO? We Quit by Andrew Bacevich

Fake Faith and Epic Crimes by John Pilger

The Greatest Blunder in British History by Laurence Vance

New Issue of Black Oak Presents by Michael Kleen (thanks Flavio!)

Is India Headed for Hyperinflation? by Subroto Roy (thanks Peter!)

Fucking Retards (thanks Ean!)

The Forest for the Trees by Ean Frick

An Introduction to Carl Schmitt by Gary Ulmen

National Lampoon by Austin Bramwell

How I Became a Domestic Terrorist by Ilana Mercer

Let’s Play Pretend by Peter Schiff

The Real Federal Deficit  by Tim Worstall

On the Justice of Clearing Ward Churchill by Dylan Hales

Being Honest About Abe by Jack Hunter

Should We Kill the Fed? by Pat Buchanan

Homesteading Detroit: On Urban Farming by No Third Solution

An Exercise to Clear Your Mind by Francois Tremblay

Bring on the Summer of Rage! by Charlie Brooker

Defining Terms by Thomas Fleming (thanks Chris!)

Republic Magazine: Issue # 14 (thanks Flavio!)

But in Anarchy, Who Would Make the Roads? (thanks Peter!)

Coming to a Town Near You, the BANA Newstand! 

An Interview with Noam Chomsky 

Solidarity with the Students: An Open Letter from Greek Soldiers 

Veganarchists on the London Insurrection 

PIGS/Protestors Clash in Paris 

From Twin Towers to Twin Camelots by Alexander Cockburn

Homeless in Tent City, USA by Kathy Sanborn

Girding for a Depression by Morici

The War on Drugs is a War on You by Michael Boldin

Biden, Nixon and Latin America by Saul Landau

Nuclear Power Plants: Fooling with Disaster? by Sue Sturgis

Was Gaza Israel’s Waterloo? by John Goekler

The Federal Railroading of Victoria Sprouse by William Anderson and Candice Jackson

Death to D.A.R.E. by William Norman Grigg

The Humanitarian with the Printing Press by Anthony Gregory

The PIGS Are Out to Get You by Brian Cohoon

Marijuana Reduces Tumors 

Christianity is Not a Neocon Death Cult by Tom Woods

Small Town Anarchy by J.L. Bryan (thanks Folk n’ Faith!)

There Will Be Hyper Inflation  by Thorstein Polleit

The Fair Tax is a Scam by Laurence Vance

The Goldberg Syndrome by Justin Raimondo

How to Combat Mexican Drug Cartels by Ivan Eland

Obama’s Neoliberals: Selling His Afghan War by Jeremy Scahill

An Ominous Parallel by Jacob Hornberger

Obstruction of Justice by Chris Hedges

Updated News Digest March 22, 2009 3

Quotes of the Week:

“Bad laws are the worst sort of tyranny.” -Edmund Burke

“Laws: We know what they are, and what they are worth! They are spider webs for the rich and mighty, steel chains for the poor and weak, fishing nets in the hands of the government.”

                                                                        -Pierre Joseph Proudhon

“The State calls its own violence law, but that of the individual crime.”

                                                                                      -Max Stirner

My Anarchism Problem by Bob Black

A Washington, D.C. Heretic is Punished by Eric Margolis

America’s Ivy League College: The Dumbass Factory by C. J. Maloney

Traveling in the New China by Chris Clancy

The Ides of March Got a Bad Rap by Cheryl Vanbuskirk

Et Tu, Switzerland? by Balz Bruppacher

Drunk Driving Laws Are Absurd by Mark R. Crovelli

The Drug War vs Civilization Anthony Gregory interviewed by Scott Horton

Continuity and Change by Justin Raimondo

These Secretaries Can’t Even Type by Jeff Huber

Taliban Plan Drags Obama Deeper by Gareth Porter

Obama Follows Bush on Detainees by William Fisher

Who Are the “Worst of the Worst”? by Andy Worthington

Of Patriots and Assassins by Pat Buchanan

John Stossel Takes Down Sean Hannity 

Zionism is the Problem by Ben Ehrenreich

What We Don’t Know About Iraq by Philip Bennett

How Abu Ghraib Was Politically Defused, Part One by James Bovard

Ending Our Imperial Foreign Policy by Fareed Zakaria

The More Things Change… by Srdja Trifkovic

Racist Jim Clyburn by Jack Hunter

The Domestic Costs of Empire from Richmond Left-Libertarian Alliance

San Francisco PIGS Attack Demonstrators 

Wobblies March in San Diego 

Racist Abuse of Pennsylvania Prisoners 

Shut Down IMF/World Bank Meeting 

Santa Cruz Anarchist Convergence, May 7-11 

Obama and the Empire by Bill and Kathleen Christison

Victory for the Left in El Salvador by Richard Gott

Americans Want Justice for Wall Street Crooks by Ralph Nader

Coxey’s Army Will March Again! by Stephen Fleischman

Dismantling the Killer Elite by William Norman Grigg

EU Bans “Miss” and “Mrs” As Sexist (the journey into the Cultural Marxist Twilight Zone continues)

California to Legalize Marijuana? 

What Should We Do in the Face of Private Firearms Confiscation? by Mike Gaddy

The Emerging Marxist Church by Bill Anderson

The Confiscation of Privately Owned Weapons by Tim Case

What Happened to the War? by Laurence Vance

Some Truths About Guantanamo Bay by Lawrence Wilkerson

Compulsory National Service On Its Way? 

A Great Debate on Afghanistan by Jacob Hornberger

My Life in the New Left by Kevin MacDonald

Systemic Failure by Pat Buchanan

Israel’s American Chattel by Paul Craig Roberts

Was the Bailout Itself a Scam? by Paul Craig Roberts

Launching Lifeboats Before the Ship Sinks by Paul Craig Roberts

Empire, Secession and the Left Kirkpatrick Sale interviewed by Jack Hunter and Dylan Hales

States’ Rights and the Left by Jack Hunter

A Lexicon of Conservative Bullshit by Dylan Hales

Is Capitalism Making Life Better? by Noam Chomsky (hat tip to Francois Tremblay)

Massive French Protests and Ontario Factory Occupation by Larry Gambone

Economics: The Abysmal Science by Thomas N. Naylor

Open Letter to the Antiwar Movement 

London PIGS Fear Insurrection at G-20 Meeting 

Conservatives In Name Only by Filmer

The Economy in Two Eras of Democrats by Sam Smith

Bedouin Villages Left in the Dark Ages by Jonathan Cook

Where Are We Leaving Iraqi Women? by Yifat Susskind

U.S. Human Rights Abuses in the War on Terror by Joanne Mariner

A Grand Bargain for the Culture Wars by TGGP

We’re Dropping Down an Economic Hole by Gerald Celente

The U.S. Dollar, R.I.P. by Peter Schiff

An Open Letter to Chuck Norris by Chuck Norris

The Big Takeover by Matt Taibbi

Warning from Bosnia for Iraq by Ivan Eland

Iran: A Way Forward by Philip Giraldi

Obama’s New Message to Iran  by Glenn Greenwald

Obama and the Neocon Middle East Agenda by Stephen Sniegoski

Negotiate with the Taliban, Free John Walker Lindh by Kelley Vlahos

Why It Matters That the Army Was on the Streets of Samson, Alabama by J.D. Tuccille

Chuck Norris: Revolutionary? 

Cops Cause Crime by Francois Tremblay

Canning for the Revolution by Chris Lempa

Enemies of What State? by Kevin Carson

Institutionalized Sadism by Rad Geek

Annual Anti-Police March in Montreal 

On the Edge of the Volcano by Alexander Cockburn

When Things Fall Apart by Paul Craig Roberts

Slumdogs vs Billionaires by P. Sainath

Local Currencies by John Robb

Targeting Banksters? by John Robb

Updated News Digest March 15, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“All universal moral principles are idle fancies.  All, all is theft, all is unceasing and rigorous competition in nature;…Are not laws dangerous which inhibit the passions? Compare the centuries of anarchy with those of the strongest legalism in any country you like and you will see that it is only when the laws are silent that the greatest actions appear.”

                                                                                      -Marquis De Sade

We Are All Collapsitarians Now by Kevin Kelly

The Pestilence of Fanaticism by U.S. Senator James A. Reed, 1925

Social Characteristics of Tribalism by Bay Area National Anarchists

9th Annual Berkeley Anarchist Students of Theory and Research and Development from Bay Area National Anarchists

All You Need to Know About the Bay Area Anarchist Bookfair 

Communism vs Agorism from No Third Solution

Randian Collective Action from theConverted

Considering Redistribution of Property from No Third Solution

Axis of the Expendable: Frum vs Limbaugh by Jack Hunter

Lyndon Baines Obama by Pat Buchanan

Conservatism: Ideology of the Old? by Razib Khan

Little Miss Zionist Gossip Queen by Adam Kharij

It’s the End of the World As We Know It by Nina Kouprianova

Did Somebody Say “Democracy”? by Kevin R. C. Gutzman

The Paleo-Punks by Dylan Hales

“The Greatest Depression” Underway from Second Vermont Republic

Too Big…Period by Ralph Nader

Stop Demonizing Iranians by Eric Margolis

Doomsday by Doug French

The Neocons Are Losing Their Grip by Glenn Greenwald

Enough with the “Diversity” by Walter Block

Sentence First, Trial Never by William Norman Grigg

Gunowners Are In Trouble by Mike Gaddy

A Victim of the State Speaks Out by Becky Akers

Signs of Progress and Danger by Justin Raimondo

Imagine An Occupied America by Ron Paul

A Convenient Scapegoat by Philip Giraldi

Enduring Blunder by Jeff Huber

Why the U.S. Under Obama Is Still a Dictatorship by Andy Worthington

Seeds Sprouting in the Rubble by Kevin Carson

Corporate Extortion from theConverted

That’s Politics for You by Sheldon Richman

Tax Revolt in Argentina from The Picket Line

The American Criminal Injustice System by Paul Craig Roberts

Decentralism or Bust Dylan Hales and Richard Spencer interviewed by Jack Hunter

Lessons From Kirkpatrick Sale by Dylan Hales

Can’t Get Enough Frum vs Limbaugh by Red Phillips

The Coming Evangelical Collapse by Dostoevsky

Bottom Feeders at the Trough  by Sharon Smith

Israeli Spying in the United States by Christopher Ketcham

Obama Caves in to the Lobby by Ray McGovern

The Doublespeak of a Discredited IMF by Eric Toussaint and Damien Millet

Prisons, Profits and the Banality of Evil by Chris Floyd

Making a Difference by Bay Area National Anarchists

The Fed Has Destroyed Your Retirement by Gary North

Home Defense in the Coming Depression Greg Perry interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Caesar Is Not God by Ryan McMaken

Do We Want the Republicans Back? by Laurence Vance

The Economics of Depression Lew Rockwell interviewed by Brian Wilson

The Drug War vs Civilization by Anthony Gregory

China: The Next Big Enemy? by Justin Raimondo

The Groundwork Has Already Been Laid for Martial Law by John Whitehead

Don’t Fear China Doug Bandow interviewed by Scott Horton

Why Is Obama Defending John Yoo? by Daphne Eviatar

Empire of Bases by Hugh Gusterson

Barack Obama, Meet Team B by Scott Ritter

The Necons Strike Back by Robert Parry

Dick Cheney’s Death Squad by Seymour Hersh

The Totalitarian Therapeutic State by Sheldon Richman

Go to Cancun With Your Virginity, Leave With 20 Kilos of Heroin 

In Defense of McCarthyism by Dylan Hales

The Parable of the Shopping Mall by Alexander Cockburn

Is This Really the End of Neoliberalism? by David Harvey

How Israel Gives Jews a Bad Name by Saul Landau

Drug War Doublespeak by Laura Carlsen

Imprisoning Immigrants for Profit by Tom Barry

Criminalizing Poverty by Chris Mobley and Leela Yellesetty

Anarchist-Communist Appeal Against NATO Summit 

San Diego IWW Demonstration for Fired Organizer 

Texas Police Exploit Black Motorists 

It’s “Racist” to Oppose Afghan War by Harrison Bergeron 2

Wrong Classical Liberal Predictions by TGGP

Individualism and Self-Defense by Mike Gaddy

A Vintage Fight Over Wine by Michael A. Lerner

The Destruction of Mexico by Guy Lawson

Crisis in Pakistan Eric Margolis interviewed by Scott Horton

Charles Freeman’s Victory by Justin Raimondo

In Memory of Rachel Corrie by Gila Svirsky

Updated News Digest March 1, 2009 1

Quote of the Week:

“Everything the State says is a lie, and everything it has it has stolen.”

                                                                              -Friedrich Nietzsche

“Journalists and opinion makers who now deride what was revolutionary and progressive about modern capitalism (an easier life and a higher standard of living) do so as to stay ahead of the curve so they can welcome with open arms the new class war between the People (the majority of the population, those who work for a living) and the Elite (the plutocrats and oligarchs, their enablers and co-conspirators in the government, and their defenders in the MSM and upper academia) and ensure they are on the winning side. These court ‘intellectuals’ (if we can even dignify them with such a word) will speak of the very real and often underexplained and underestimated economic crisis with the same level of urgency as the entirely fictional environmental crisis, itself a secularized catastrophe fantasy designed to give these postmodern Puritans something to feel morally superior about with their lifestyle politics of Whole Foods activism and urbanite entitlement.”

                                                                                  -Ean Frick

 

On the Essentials of the High Modernist Era and the Current Crisis by Ean Frick

Maybe the Meltdown Wasn’t What You Think by Peter Brimelow

Why the U.S. Stimulus Package is Bound to Fail by David Harvey

Slumdog Success Story from Distributist Review

ACORN Initiates Civil Disobedience to Stop Foreclosures by Fernanda Santos

The PIGS Are At It Again from Rad Geek

Self-Management in Cuba, Part 3? by Larry Gambone

Choose Responsibility: Abolish the Drinking Age by from Thus Spoke Belinsky

How the Economy Was Lost by Paul Craig Roberts

American Homelessness Indicts Elite Heartlessness by Donald A. Collins

Why Merge Turkey with Europe? Why Merge Mexico with the U.S.? by Taki Theodoracopulos

How the Jews Got Their Smarts by Razib Khan

The Baptism of the State by Richard Spencer

Do You Really Want a “Conservation on Race”? by Pat Buchanan

Our Enemy, the GOP by Paul Gottfried

Get Those Shovels Ready to Dig Our Economic Graves by Bill Bonner

Weary Cogs in the Imperial Machine by Mark Crovelli

The Tax Attack on Persecuted Smokers by Philip Hensley

The Friendly Iranians by Will Hide

The Israel-Firsters Gasping, Dying Smear Tactics by Glenn Greenwald

Obama Should Follow Gorbachev’s Example by Eric Margolis

Republican National Socialism by Mike Tennant

Getting On With It in China  by Chris Clancy

Federal Repression of Secessionists? by Carol Moore

Twenty States Are Talking About Secession 

Puritannically Correct Cruelty by William Norman Grigg

The Rise of Avigdor Lieberman by Justin Raimondo

Empire at the End of Its Rope by Alan Bock

Cambodia’s Missing Accused by John Pilger

Peace or Peril by Chris Hedges

Obama’s Bananastan by Jeff Huber

Who Is Binyam Mohamed? by Andy Worthington

Don’t Let the Iran Headlines Scare You by Robert Dreyfuss

We Need a Truth Commission to Uncover Bush-Era Wrongdoing by James Cavallaro

Israel is Blind to Its Own Arab Citizens by Fareed Zakaria

Obama’s “Humane” Guantanamo is a Joke by Andy Worthington

Obama’s Embrace of Bush/Cheney “Terrorism” Policies by Glenn Greenwald

GI Resistance in Chicago 

Tax Time  from Second Vermont Republic

Is Nationalization Inevitable? by Peter Morici

The New War in Iraq by Patrick Cockburn

Going Up Against Big Coal in West Virginia by Mike Roselle

Obama Steps on the Pentagon Escalator by Franklin Spinney

How Credit Unions Survived the Crash by Ralph Nader

Kennedy and the Corporate Lobbies Craft a Health Plan by Helen Redmond

Murderous Atlanta PIGS Sentenced to Fed Time (don’t drop the soap, piggies!)

A Particular Universalism by TGGP

Affirmative Action Around the World by Thomas Sowell

Who Pulls the Strings: Zionism or Capitalism? Norman Finkelstein and James Petras debate

The New York Times is Going Under-Hooray!! by Eric Englund

Race Cowards in Academia by Walter Williams

Billions for Bankers, Nothing for Homeowners by Dave Gonigam

Understanding Environmentalism by Vin Suprynowicz

The Obamanians Are Dangerously Wrong by Lew Rockwell

Race Agitator by William Norman Grigg

The Sickening Media by Glenn Greenwald

Ron Paul vs Paul Volcker 

Will There Be Civil Unrest in the U.S.? 

The Forerunner to Obamanomics by Lew Rockwell

Gun Owners in the Age of Obama by Mike Gaddy

The Silence of the Liberals by Justin Raimondo

To Russia, With Hate by Justin Raimondo

Balancing Beijing by Doug Bandow

Start Closing Overseas Bases Now by David Vine

Beware Treating Afghanistan Like Iraq by Patrick Cockburn

What Obama’s Risking in Afghanistan by John Bruhns

Return of the War Party  by Pat Buchanan

Obamaland by Charles Glass

Affirmative Action GOP by Jack Hunter

Poverty Does Not Cause Terrorism by Austin Bramwell

The Transition to a Relocalized Manufacturing Economy by Kevin Carson

So Much for the Freedom to Protest by Francois Tremblay

South Carolina House Adopts State Sovereignty Resolution 

Alternatives to Panic: Rising from the Ashes of the Old Economy by P. B. Floyd

Teacher and Student: The New Class Struggle by Niranjan Ramakrishna

Obama’s Non-Withdrawal Withdrawal Plan by Chris Floyd

Afghanistan: Chaos Central by Chris Sands

All About Greed by Sheldon Richman

Wall Street Journal Says Limited Liability Plays a Role in Current Crisis 

The Pentagon is a Money Toilet by John Zmirak

We Should Laugh at Race-Based Jokes, Says Clint Eastwood 

PIG Assaults 15-Year-Old Girl 

It Would Be Cheaper to Fight WW2 Again by Robert Higgs

Glenn Beck is a Worthless Piece of Shit

The Economics of Empire David Henderson interviewed by Scott Horton

Drawdown Plan May Leave Combat  Brigades in Iraq by Gareth Porter

Obama’s Afghan Problem by Thomas Eddlem

Doomed to Repeat History in Afghanistan by Joseph Galloway

Starting the Second Korean War by Doug Bandow

Obama’s War on Terror by Joanne Mariner

Obama’s Iraq Plan Ain’t It by Robert Dreyfuss

Obama’s Debt Orgy by Peter Schiff

Anarchism and Radical Governments by Larry Gambone

PIGS Occupy California High School 

Is Nancy Pelosi Really Against War Crimes? by Alexander Cockburn

From Bush to Obama: Seven Years of Wartime Propaganda by Anthony DiMaggio

The Banks War on Workers by Mischa Gaus

Ruining Young Lives for Profit by Nicole Colson

National-Anarchist Beach Cleanse by Bay Area National Anarchists

Updated News Digest February 22, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“Conservatives uphold voluntary community, quite as they oppose involuntary collectivism. Although Americans have been attached strongly to privacy and private rights, they also have been a people conspicuous for a successful spirit of community. In a genuine community, the decisions most directly affecting the lives of citizens are made locally and voluntarily. Some of these functions are carried out by local political bodies, others by private associations: so long as they are kept local, and are marked by the general agreement of those affected, they constitute healthy community. But when these functions pass by default or usurpation to centralized authority, then community is in serious danger.

Whatever is beneficent and prudent in modern democracy is made possible through cooperative volition. If, then, in the name of an abstract Democracy, the functions of community are transferred to distant political direction why, real government by the consent of the governed gives way to a standardizing process hostile to freedom and human dignity. For a nation is no stronger than the numerous little communities of which it is composed. A central administration, or a corps of select managers and civil servants, however well intentioned and well trained, cannot confer justice and prosperity and  tranquility upon a mass of men and women deprived of their old responsibilities. That experiment has been made before; and it has been disastrous. It is the performance of our duties in community that teaches us prudence and efficiency and charity.”

                                                                                     -Russell Kirk

The Feminazi War Against Liberty, Family, and All Good Things by Stephen Baskerville

Boomers-Your Financial Crisis Has Arrived by James Quinn

Help, Help, I’m Being Repressed! classic scene from a classic film

New Boss, Worse Than the Old Boss? by Lew Rockwell

The Looting Bush Family Russ Baker interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Western Aggression Against Iran by Eric Margolis

State Money vs. Private Money by Gary North

Talk Show Leninism by William Norman Grigg

Pro-Smuggling: Because I Have a Brain by Cristina C. Espina

The Nanny State by Laurence Vance

Hold Them Accountable by Justin Raimondo

Renounce Extraordinary Rendition by Philip Giraldi

“Anti-Semitic Pandemic” by Ran HaCohen

Reckoning for Bush? by William Fisher

The Draft: Just Say No by Ron Paul

Hamas Pushed to the Wall Over Cease-Fire by Mel Frykberg

Obama Defends Torturers and Wiretappers by Thomas Eddlem

Obama Embraces Bush’s Abuses by Bruce Fein

Avoiding Another Cold War by Scott Ritter

We Are All Extremists Now! by Seuman Milne

Where Will Obama Take U.S. in Afghanistan? by Alan Bock

Crisis Over Kosovo by Ian Bancroft

Israel is Trapped, and the Chance for Peace is Ever More Remote by Bruce Anderson

Crises vs. Liberty by Jacob Hornberger

Obama’s War in Iraq May Be Longer Than Bush’s War in Iraq by Thomas Ricks

Obama: The President of Special Interests by Paul Craig Roberts

The Metrics of National Decline by Pat Buchanan

Who Remembers “Guns and Butter”? by Paul Craig Roberts

Has the Schiff  Hit the Fan? by Karen De Coster

Bipartisan Generational Theft by Jack Hunter

BBC Priggery by Derek Turner

Meltdown Tom Woods and Richard Spencer interviewed by Jack Hunter

Why Pay Less? by Cristina Oxenberg

Idiocracy by Paul Gottfried

Center For a Stateless Society -Fundraiser by Brad Spangler

Entrepreneurs in Everything by Niccolo Adami

Obama’s “Civilian National Security Force” Has Been Established 

Ten Conservative Principles by Russell Kirk

British Man Fined Over Racist Abuse…of Germans 

North Idaho Polygamist Sect Draws Scrutiny 

To Alter or Abolish by David Bardallis

The Obama Deception 

The Politics of Economic Disaster 

Beating Back Modern Lincolnism by Patroon

Evolutionary Conservatism by MRob

The Oligarchs Escape Plan by Michael Hudson

The One-Dimensional Congress by Ralph Nader

Commodifying the Revolution by John Ross

Who Is a Terrorist? by Matt Svensson

Iraq Reconstruction: The Greatest Fraud in U.S. History by Patrick Cockburn

The Meltdown: Whose Fault is It? by P. Sainath

Did George Washington Smoke Pot? by Harvey Wasserman

White Recession, Black Depression by Dedrick Muhammad

Sean Hannity-Secessionist?

Hideous He-She Hag of the Week (but not all trannies are PC turdballs-don’t be prejudiced!)

The Politics of Johann Wolfgang Goethe by Hans Hermann Hoppe

“This is the Modern Underground Railroad” 

Get Out of the Euro by Gary North

Mexicans Are Dying in the U.S. Drug War by Steven Greenhut

Time Magazine is Finished! by Dave Gonigam

The Comic Opera of Democracy by William S. Lind

Where the Wild Things Are (The Soviet-Afghani War 1979-1989) by C. J. Maloney

Smuggling: Personal Free Trade by Cristina Espina

America’s Confused Cause in Central Asia by William Pfaff

Hollywood’s New Censors by John Pilger

Counter Intelligence by Philip Giraldi

It Isn’t All About Me by Justin Raimondo

Will Obama Close the School of the Americas? by Chris Steele

Peace or the Draft William Astore interviewed by Scott Horton

The Israeli Elections Jason Ditz interviewed by Scott Horton

The Super Judge Who Wants to Rule the World by Srdja Trifkovic

“We Will Behead the Infidels of Those Who Construct Negative Images of Muslims!” 

Public Schooling and Criminal Texting by Rad Geek

A Nation of Cowards? by Stonewall

Arizona Anarchist Assembly 

Sticks and Stones-New Anarchist Periodical 

The Cleanser by Norman Finkelstein

Aftermath of a Beheading by Wajahat Ali

Afghan Pitfalls by M. Shahid Alam

The Mormon Worker 

America’s Privileged Apparatchik Class by Stephanie Fitch

Self-Management in Cuba? by Larry Gambone

Spectral Analysis  by Roderick Long

Death to the New Class  from Rad Geek

Self-Management in Cuba, Part 2? by Larry Gambone

“He Was a Man of His Times” by Francois Tremblay

The Long Retreat by Pat Buchanan

From One Assault on the Constitution to Another by Paul Craig Roberts

The Status of Women vs Diversity? by Brenda Walker

A Conversation About Race by Richard Spencer

Young Americans for Liberty Jeff Frazee interviewed by Richard Spencer and Jack  Hunter

Do We Need More Race Talk? by Lila Rajiva

Castro Did Not Improve the Lives of Cubans by Humberto Fontova

Swiss Peoples Party Stands Up to U.S. Imperialism 

Soros and Volcker: Worse Than the Great Depression 

More Americans Support Marijuana Legalization Than the Stimulus Package 

Preparing for a Domestic Surge? by William Norman Grigg

“We Are Not Responsible” by Pat Buchanan

Liking Ike by Lew Rockwell

Beyond Open and Closed Borders by Laurence Vance

Obama’s Policy on Civil Liberties: Bush Lite? by Ivan Eland

Twilight in Afghanistan? by Philip Giraldi

Our Enemy, the President by Daniel McCarthy

Smearing The American Conservative by Glenn Greenwald

Don’t Bet on Obama Reining in Defense Spending by Benjamin H. Friedman

The Emerging State Sovereignty Movement by Patroon

Liberals Jump On Obama’s War Bandwagon by Justin Raimondo

The Prince of Darkness Denies Own Existence by Dana Milbank

The Lawyer’s Tale  by Alexander Cockburn

Using the Recession to Hammer Workers by David Lindorff

War Criminals Must Be Prosecuted by Marjorie Cohn

Updated News Digest February 15, 2009 Reply

Quotes of the Week:

“Nowadays the Capitalist cry is: “Nationalize what you like; municipalize all you can; turn the courts of justice into courts martial and your parliaments and corporations into boards of directors with your most popular mob orators in the chair, provided the rent, the interest, and the profits come to us as before, and the proletariat still gets nothing but its keep.”

This is the great corruption of Socialism which threatens us at present. It
calls itself Fascism in Italy, National Socialism (Nazi for short) in Germany,
New Deal in the United States, and is clever enough to remain nameless in
England; but everywhere it means the same thing: Socialist production and
Unsocialist distribution. So far, out of the frying pan into the fire.”

                – George Bernard Shaw, Everybody’s Political What’s What (1944)

“The most dangerous man, to any government, is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Almost inevitably he comes to the conclusion that the government he lives under is dishonest, insane and intolerable, and so, if he is romantic, he tries to change it.”

                                                                                                -H.L. Mencken

American Triumphalism: A Postmortem by Andrew Bacevich

The Two Faces of Libertarianism by Austin Bramwell

The New Neocons by Barron YoungSmith

The Ron Paul Youth: Young Americans for Liberty 

The Gist of Paul Gottfried by Thomas F. Bertonneau

Why Are American Literacy Rates So Low? by Christina Oxenberg

New New Nationalism by Pat Buchanan

Will the Surge Work? by Jack Hunter

Tony Blankley: Imperialist Scumbag Supremo by Dylan Hales

Obama’s Savior-Based Economy by Michelle Malkin

President and Congress Grovel Before the Fed by Chuck Baldwin

Ship of Fools-May You Live in Interesting Times by Paul Craig Roberts

Are We All Socialists Now? by Robert Higgs

Herbert Spencer: Social Darwinist or Libertarian Prophet?  by Peter Richards

Thank You for Not Breeding by Francois Tremblay

Death to the PIGS 

The Cases for Pessimism and Optimism by Wendy McElroy

History is Written by the Idiots by Francois Tremblay

Disrobing the System: Obama vs “Real Change” from Slingshot

Thoughts on the Crisis: What is Planned for Us and the Alternatives by Andrew N. Flood

Is the Global Economy Fixable? by Thomas N. Naylor

How Do People in Gaza Keep Going? by Kathy Kelly

A Commodity Called Misery by Joe Bageant

Seek Truth, But Prosecute Liars by Dave Lindorff

Taking the Bong by Binoy Kampmark

Conservatism is Dead by Sam Tanenhaus

R.I.P. Henry Ashby Turner by William Grimes

Australian Bush Fire Tragedy by National Anarchists of Australia/New Zealand

Police Watching “White Enclave” from AnarchoNation

Tribes on the High Seas from AnarchoNation

Andy Griffith and Civil Society by Darrin Knode

The Left, the Right and the State Lew Rockwell interviewed by Scott Horton

The Patent-Copyright Regime by Jeffrey Tucker

The Evil of Immunity for PIGS by Bill Anderson

Obama is Making You Poorer by Lew Rockwell

The Growing Army of Angry Men by Mark Crovelli

Obama’s Cure is Worse Than the Ailment by Eric Margolis

No Free Speech in Britain by Sean Gabb

Instead of a Stimulus-Do Nothing! Seriously! by Robert Higgs

The Porn Bailout by Doug French

The Enslavers by William Norman Grigg

The Audacity of Mendacity by Justin Raimondo

Kyrgyzstan’s Revenge by Justin Raimondo

Obama Wants a Surge of His Own by Charles Pena

Obama Lies for Israel by Grant F. Smith

Is An Empire Necessary? by Bruce Fein

The 180-Degree Reversal of Obama’s State Secrets Position by Glenn Greenwald

The Holocaust is Over by David Gordon

What if Avigdor Lieberman Were in Austria? by Glenn Greenwald

The Biden Speech: The Downside by Robert Dreyfuss

The Plight of the Skanks by Richard Spencer

Obamania in Canuckistan by Nina Kouprianova

The Old California by Justin Raimondo

The Economic Apocalypse Isn’t So Bad by Richard Spencer

Dylan Hales interviewed by Jack Hunter 

Abraham Lincoln: Taking the Gloss Off the Great Emancipator by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel

What Is Anarchism? by Rad Geek

Americans Favor a Probe of War on Terror Excesses 

Secession Workshops and Seminars Now Available 

The Largest Wave of Suicides in History 

Change We Can Smoke? by Fred Gardner

A Call to End All Renditions by Marjorie Cohn

Who’s Running Guantanamo? by Andy Worthington

Judges Nabbed for Jailing Kids for Kickbacks by Dave Lindorff

Against Military Slavery by Karen Kwiatkowski

Abe the Mass Murderer: A Lincoln Scholar Comes Clean by Tom DiLorenzo

Economic Meltdown Tom Woods interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Tim Geithner and the Ruling Class by Morgan Reynolds

Killer Greens Down Under by Andrea Petrie

Fred Reed Retires-We’ll Miss You, Fred! 

Gerald Celente on FOX 

More Gerald Celente: “The Worst Economic Collapse Ever” 

Obama Backs Bush “State Secrets” Position by J.D. Tuccille

The History of Schools from InfoAll

The Worker As Tool 

A Pierre Joseph Proudhon Reader 

Anarchism and Its Many Sects by Shawn Wilbur

How Will Obama’s Deficits Be Financed? by Paul Craig Roberts

Obama’s Great Game by Pat Buchanan

Geithner Lays an Egg by Peter Schiff

Being Honest About Abe by Jack Hunter

Libertarians, Freaks and Kooks by Dylan Hales

Comic Libertarianism by Tom Piatak and Kevin Michael Grace

Darwinian Traditionalism by Matthew Roberts

France: It Couldn’t Happen Here, Could It? by Ted Rall

On the Rocks by Alexander Cockburn

Pakistan On the Brink by Brian M. Downing

Israel’s Ball Boys by Christopher Ketcham

Why Can Judd Gregg See What Obama Can’t? by Dave Lindorff

A Short History of Business Handouts by Stephen Lendman

How the American Empire Will Fall by Tom Schmidt

Joint Venture by David Usborne

Should You Join the Military? by Laurence Vance

Stimulus to Depression Lew Rockwell on the Mark and Jim Show

Out of Iraq? by Justin Raimondo

Barack Obama’s Empire Chris Floyd interviewed by Scott Horton

The International Silence on Gaza by Ann Wright

Can Procedural Utility Lend a Hand to Paleo-Libertarianism? by Dain Fitzgerald

Updated News Digest February 8, 2009 2

Quote of the Week:

“A war for Kuwait? A war for an oil-can! The rest is vanity; the rest is crime
… an unimaginative, ‘democratic capitalist’ Republican regime, early in 1991, committed the United States, very possibly, to a new imperialism.

                                            –Russell Kirk, The Politics of Prudence

Cystic Fibrosis Fundraiser by Bay Area National Anarchists-Donate! 

Cultural Marxism in Canada: Prosecuting Polygamy, Protecting Gay Marriage 

How to Save Money Like a Mormon by Jennifer Dobner

Israel Hopes to Colonize Parts of Iraq as “Greater Israel” by Wayne Madsen

When Did We Stop Caring About Civilian Deaths During Wartime? by Robert Fisk

Elect the Cops-The Response by Dylan Hales

Trial of Neo-Nazi Leader to Have Important 1st Amendment Implications 

America: A Bankrupt and Discredited Country by Paul Craig Roberts

War Tax Resistance lecture by David Schenk

Pro-Life Tax Resistance by Dr. Gerald DePyper

The Therapeutic State in North Carolina 

The Persecution of Michael Phelps 

Czech President Attacks Al Gore’s Climate Campaign 

Monetary Lessons from America’s Past lecture by Tom Woods

Putin to the West: Take Your Medicine by Justin Raimondo

The Return of Real Interventionism by Leon Hadar

Renditions May Expand Under Obama from AntiwarNews

Obama: Agent of Change? Well, Agent of Something… by Jeremy Sapienza

The Bogus War on Terror by Eric Margolis

End Legal Immunity for Government Officials by Bill Anderson

Going Bankrupt for “National Defense” by Tom Engelhardt and Chalmers Johnson

Our Rulers Are Destroying Our World by Bob Higgs

Coming: The Third American Hyperinflation by Mike Rozeff

Condemn the System, Not Michael Phelps by Paul Armentano

Served, Protected and Sodomized in Baltimore 

Ideology and the Internet  by Justin Raimondo

Repudiate the Monroe Doctrine by Phillip Brenner and Saul Landau

Politically, Hamas May Have Won by Adam Morrow and Khaled Moussa al-Omrani

Obama’s Defense of Rumsfeld and Yoo by Jacob Hornberger

Neocons Spin Pentagon Budget Increase as Cut by Glenn Greenwald

What Cheney’s Daughter’s Senior Thesis Tells Us About the Bush Presidency by Zac Frank

Protect and Defend…The Military-Industrial Complex by Jeff Huber

Obama’s Wars by Bill Moyers

First, Jail All Bush’s Lawyers by Robert Parry

How the U.S. Created an Enemy in Iran by Brett Popplewell

Obama’s War Cabinet Stephen Zunes interviewed by Scott Horton

Putin’s Warning to America Justin Raimondo interviewed by Scott Horton

Military to Pledge Oath to Obama, Not Constitution by Michelle Chang

Nancy Pelosi’s New Deal by Pat Buchanan

The War on Terror is a Hoax by Paul Craig Roberts

I Saw Iceland Melt by Kevin DeAnna

Why Iceland Melted by Richard Spencer

How to Prevent Vermont from Going Down with the Titanic by Thomas N. Naylor

How Much Does It Cost Vermont to Remain in the Union? by Thomas N. Naylor

We, the Anarchists-An Interview with Stuart Christie by Chuck Morse

Resisting Anti-Panhandling Law by David Beyer

A Generals’ Revolt? by Dave Lindorff

Obama’s Lincoln Thing by Kirkpatrick Sale

What to Do About Wall Street by Ralph Nader

Reactionary Late Modernism: Back in Style! from Ean Frick

The 68ers In A Nutshell from Ean Frick

Former Trots Make Good from Ean Frick

The One-State Solution by Muammar Qaddafi

America First by Merle Haggard

The Therapeutic State Strikes in Australia and New Zealand

American Fascism by Karen Kwiatkowski

The Blessed Return of Right-Wing Paranoia by Anthony Gregory

French Cartoonist on Trial for “Anti-Semitism” 

The Iranian Revolution 30 Years On: Was it Worth it? by Angus McDowell

Stasi Britain: The Culture of Snitches by Melanie Phillips

Never Talk to the Cops 

Fractional Reserves Have Wrecked the Fascist State by Gary North

Stimulating Tyranny by William Norman Grigg

Endgame? What Endgame? by Justin Raimondo

The Nightmare of Netanyahu Returns by Johann Hari

Hold Israel Accountable for Gaza by George Bisharat

Geert Wilders and the Dutch Republic byDerek Turner

This is Just the Beginning by Peter Schiff

Reefer Madness by Jack Hunter

Those Darn Purists! by Grant Havers

Do Americans Cherish Freedom Anymore? by Chuck Baldwin

Whistleblowers and Management by Larry Gambone

More Than a Paycheck National War Tax Coordinating Committee

Simple Solutions to Stupid Problems by Rad Geek

Counter-Economic Optimism 

Authoritarians in Libertarian Clothing by Kevin Carson

Obama’s First Bad Week by Alexander Cockburn

Obama and the Empire by William Blum

Ten Reasons to Get High About Pot in 2009 by Norm Kent

Obama, Mitchell and the Palestinians by James Abourezk

Occupied Territory by Russell Mokhiber

Obama, Race and the Future of U.S. Politics by Bob Wing

Economy on a Thread by Dave Lindorff

The End of the Monroe Doctrine Saul Landau interviewed by Scott Horton

Why Not Apologize to Iran for the Coup? by Robert Naiman

Sorrows of Empire Chalmers Johnson interviewed by Scott Horton

Bush Jr.’s Foreign Policy Legacy Doug Bandow interviewed by Scott Horton

Obama, The Ruling Class and the Future of Secession 5

Thus far, the Obama presidency has moved along lines similar to what one might expect. The significance some would assign to his mulatto ancestry notwithstanding, Mr. Obama is very much an Establishment Man. The actions of the Obama administration in its earliest days indicate that the policies of this administration will largely be a continuation of those of the Bush administration. On economic policy, Obama has surrounded himself with neoliberals and called for deficit spending on additional bank and corporate welfare in the form of the “stimulus package.” The so-called “stimulus” is really just Phase Two of the extravagant “bailout” program enacted under President Bush. This should not be surprising, given that Obama’s primary financial backers during his campaign were Goldman-Sachs and other principal beneficiaries of the bailout, which Obama supported as a Senator. Of course, the “stimulus” program includes some additional social spending for the sake of appeasing various Democratic Party constituencies. This is the reason, along with sheer partisanship, that the Republicans are opposing the stimulus, which they are correct to do, even if they are doing so for all the wrong reasons.

On foreign policy, it appears that the Obama administration, whose foreign policy team is comprised mostly of recycled Clintonites, will continue to pursue the same set of foreign policy goals as the Bush administration. Obama has called for increased military spending, expanding the war in Afghanistan, perhaps to Pakistan, and it appears renditions will also continue. Obama does seem to be scaling back operations at Guantanamo, yet only as a public relations  maneuver so far as world opinion is concerned. It’s not like the prisoners at Guantanamo are going to be released. Indeed, it would appear that the only real difference between Bush and Obama on foreign policy is that the Obama government will be less bellicose in its formal rhetoric. As a protege’ of Zbigniew Brzezinski, Obama represents the liberal internationalist wing of the foreign policy elite, who are just as committed to the preservation of the Empire as the neoconservatives, but who are more cautious about openly giving the finger to allies, client states, and world opinion. Liberal internationalists realize that this is not conducive to the efficient administration of the Empire or its maintenance over the long haul, particularly given the current dependence of the U.S. economy on Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Arab lenders.

Obama also kowtows to the Israel Lobby, as illustrated by his appearance before AIPAC prior to his election to the presidency and his appointment of Rahm Emmanuel. James Petras has observed that the Obama administration contains as many arch-Zionists as any previous administration. There is also some indication that Israel will go to war with Iran under Obama’s watch, which could likely lead to actual U.S. participation in such a war. In fact, the overall amount of U.S. military intervention may escalate under Obama, as it did under Bill Clinton.

On “culture war” issues, Obama predictably leans somewhat to the left of the Bush government. So far, he has lifted the abortion-related “gag rule” and eased restrictions on stem cell research, and Obama has also signed an “equal pay for equal work” law as a reward for his middle-class feminist constituency. Yet Obama is far from being an ACLU civil libertarian. For instance, he voted as a Senator to authorize warrantless wiretaps and provide legal immunity to telecommunications companies engaged in such actions.

I’ve written before that the election of Obama signifies a demographic, cultural and generational shift among the American electorate. The left side of the “culture war” now has the upper hand, if it did not already. The Democrats will likely be the dominant political party for the forseeable future due to the fact that those groups who vote Democratic are growing in number and those who vote Republican are shrinking. The Obama coalition includes the left-wing of the “old elite” (demonstrated by the Kennedys support for Obama), the New Class center-left welfare state professionals, the “bourgeois bohemians” that David Brooks has written about, upwardly mobile members of the traditional outgroups now in ascension (blacks, immigrants, Jews, feminists, gays), newer ideological movements like environmentalism, younger people and a wide variety of public sector dependents. This coalition will probably prove to be stable enough to sustain itself over the next few decades even if matters like economic downturn occasionally produce a victory for the Republicans.  

Because the liberal side of the culture wars is gaining does not mean that the culture wars are over. While there is not enough of a constituency for the kind of cultural conservatism represented by the religious right  or the right-wing Republicans for these to achieve a majority in a national election, proponents of such an outlook are a large and vocal enough group to continue to be a force for political and cultural polarization for some time, even if their prospects for long-term victory are dim.

Indeed, the evidence indicates that the U.S. Congress of 2008 was the most polarized of any Congress in 120 years! The degree to which Americans are polarized has increased even in the last five years. Further, as Bill Bishop has shown, Americans are becoming more and more geographically segregated along cultural, ideological, religious, economic, ethnic, racial and generational lines.

As an old-fashioned anarchist who wishes to see an end to the U.S. empire internationally and the end of the Big Brother state domestically, I see this polarization as a welcome phenomenon. It is difficult for a state to survive when there is no consensus on primary values. If the cultural Left is going to be in the ascendency, then let’s hope that the likes of Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, et.al. turn up the volume even louder and keep the polarization coming.  Those guys really aren’t my cup of tea, but I’m all for increased divisiveness.

Divisiveness will likely escalate for a variety of reasons. One of these will be the widening gap between socio-economic classes, which Obama shows no signs of doing anything about. Another will be the social conflict associated with  increased statism as politics becomes a spoils system for different groups looking to plunder one another. Increased diversity will likely result in increased disharmony in many ways, and the massive American police state will likely be used to squelch economic unrest and sharpening demographic conflict.

If secession by regions and communities is the most viable method of dissolving the Empire, as I believe it is, then it would seem that we revolutionaries should devote ourselves to the following tasks:

1) Continue to popularize the idea of secession. A Zogby poll taken last year showed that twenty-two percent of Americans support the right of secession, with eighteen percent saying they would support a secession movement in their area. Additionally, forty-four percent say the U.S. political system is broken and cannot be fixed. We need to get these numbers up.

2) Continue to develop actual secession movements and build constituencies for these movements. For instance, the dominance of the cultural Left is likely to increase support for separatist ideas on the Right. There is a prototype for this in the rise of the militia movement during the Clinton era. Likewise, Obama is likely to prove to be a disappointment to many on the Left, both blacks and whites, and this combined with increased economic misfortune may generated secession movements from the Left. The nationwide, continent-wide proliferation of secessionist tendencies from the Right and Left against the ruling class Center would be a highly welcome event.

3) Encourage greater polarization. In some ways, we should think of Limbaugh, Hannity, Newt Gingrich, Ann Coulter, Michael Moore, Al Franken, Barney Frank and Arianna Huffington as the public relations arm for a future pan-secessionist movement as it is figures such as these who serve to create the polarization likely to result in eventual political splintering.

4) Build cross-cultural, cross-ideological alliances against the ruling class common enemy whenever feasible. If Afro-centrics, Black Muslims, militiamen and Ku Klux Klansmen can engage in common action, then what the hell is wrong with the rest of us?

Updated News Digest February 1, 2009 7

Quotes of the Week:

“A centralised democracy may be as tyrannical as an absolute monarch; and if the vigour of the nation is to continue unimpaired, each individual, each family, each district, must preserve as far as possible its independence, its self-completeness, its powers and its privilege to manage its own affairs and think its own thoughts.

                         –James Anthony Froude (1818-1894), author and historian.
                            Source: Short Studies on Great Subjects

“Whoever appeals to the law against his fellow man is either a fool or a coward. Whoever cannot take care of himself without police protection is both. It is as cowardly to betray an offender to justice, even though his offences be against yourself, as it is not to avenge an injury by violence. It is dastardly and contemptible in a wounded man to betray the name of his assailant, because if he recovers, he must naturally expect to take vengeance himself.”
 
                             – From Porello, The Rise and Fall of the Cleveland Mafia

Save the Economy by Cutting the Defense Budget by Winslow T. Wheeler

Torture at a Louisiana Prison by Jordan Flaherty

Access to Economic Justice by Ralph Nader

How Iceland Fell by Rev. Jose’ M. Tirado

What If Israel Were in Your Neighborhood? by Russell Mokhiber

Speaking the Truth is a Career Ending Event by Paul Craig Roberts

The India Lobby: Drunk with the Sight of Power by Vijay Prashad

Bolivia Looking Forward by Benjamin Dangl

The Torture Ban That Doesn’t Ban Torture by Allan Nairn

Afghanistan Is No Threat to America by Dave Lindorff

The Ghost of LBJ by Norman Solomon

The Economy Will Collapse-Drastic Action Will Be Taken from Trends Research Institute

Noam Chomsky on Obama and Pakistan from SlackBastard

Molinari Symposium 2009: Call for Papers on Intellectual Property 

Rad Geek Speaks on Anarchism in Vegas 

The Atrocity of Hope  by Roderick Long

A Bibi-Barack Collision? by Pat Buchanan

Anti-Military Conservatives by Jack Hunter

Money for Nothing by David Gordon

Put Torture on Trial by Philip Giraldi

Meet the New Boss, He’s the Same as the Old Boss by David Henderson

Muslim World Hails the End of Gitmo by William Fisher

War Crimes in Gaza Kathy Kelly interviewed by Scott Horton

The Politics of Palestine Dean Ahmad interviewed by Scott Horton

Obama Good on Detainee Policy So Far Andy Worthington interviewed by Scott Horton

Obama’s Vietnam  by Justin Raimondo

Five Questions for George Mitchell by Sandy Nolan and Tom Engelhardt

Not Thrilled About Obama by Tony Campos

Continuing Bush Policies in Israel and Afghanistan by Glenn Greenwald

Thus Sprach Obama: Pouring Acid on Gaza’s Wounds by Chris Floyd

Gaza War Pushes Arabs to the Brink by Robert Dreyfuss

Two Prisons Pose Similar Problems for President Obama by Eric Schmitt

Did Bush’s Usurpations Keep Us Safe? by Bruce Fein

Ministry of Truth and Peace by Jeff Huber

Refuting Cheney’s Lies on Guantanamo by Andy Worthington

Is Political Islam a Threat to the West? by Wajahat Ali

Obama’s Guantanamo Opportunity by Anthony Gregory

Barack Obama, Meet Lyndon Johnson by Juan Cole

Are We Civilized Enough to Hold Our Leaders Accountable for War Crimes? by John Dean

End the Iraq Occupation by Medea Benjamin

Close Gitmo and Get Out of Cuba by Eric Margolis

Bush, Obama and the American State by Anthony Gregory

Nobody Ever Said You Needed a High IQ to Be a Celebrity 

The Answer is Freedom by Lew Rockwell

Dumb Cop of the Week 

The Greatest Depression in History is Coming Gerald Celente interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Protection Through “Law Enforcement” by Mike Gaddy

Hyperinflation and the U.S. Banana Republic by Mike Rozeff

The Torture State Endures and Prospers by William Norman Grigg

Eminent Domain in Palestine by Glenn Greenwald

George W. Bush: More Freedom Hokum by Jim Bovard

Gay is Okay to Adopt in the U.K., But Old is Not 

The Proliferation of Anti-Smoking Thugs 

The Case for Disunion by Joe Schembrie

Che Was An Asshole by Humberto Fontova

Lies of War by Chris Hedges

The Mailed Fist and the Velvet Glove by Justin Raimondo

Obama the Imperialist by Richard Seymour

Can Israel Last? by Fred Reed

What Stimulus Advocates Learned from the “Push” for War with Iraq by Jesse Walker

It is Time to End the War on Terror by Philip Giraldi

Iranians You Don’t Know by Rick Steves

Bill Kristol: A Case Study in Affirmative Action by Paul Campos

Interface: A Journal For and About Social Movements 

The New New Deal, Same as the Old New Deal by Daniel Flynn

The Institution of “Institutional Racism” by Derek Turner

The US is a Right-Wing USSR by Kevin DeAnna

Not Stimulating by Richard Spencer

RE: What Blacks Are Really Celebrating by Jack Hunter

RE:RE: What Blacks Are Really Celebrating by Paul Gottfried

Is It Time to Bail Out of the U.S.? by Paul Craig Roberts

Anarchist Canada?  from theConverted

The Center: America’s Greatest Political Threat by Sam Smith

A Pilgrim’s Progress by LiberaLaw

Tom Paine’s Birthday by Peter Linebaugh

The Future of Gaza: An Interview with Jimmy Carter by Riz Khan

Pakistan: The New Cambodia? by M. Reza Pirbhai

Whither the Two-State Solution? by Dina Jadallah Taschler

Economy Without Escape Routes by Alan Farago

Rise of the Red Tories by Phillip Blond (thanks, Ean!)

The Evil of Patents by Jeffrey Tucker

Kleptocrats of the World, Unite! by William Norman Grigg

America Is Not a Free Country by Mike Rozeff

The Anarchist Catholic Worker Movement by Ellen Finnigan

Here’s To Crime 

Belmont, California Imposes Complete Tobacco Prohibtion by David Kramer

The Presidency: The Founders’ Great Mistake by Garrett Epps

The Big Stimulus: Get Rid of the Empire by Justin Raimondo

Diplomatic Means to Militaristic Ends by Doug Bandow

The Iranian Revolution, Thirty Years On by Sadegh Kabeer

Obama’s Flock of Hawks by Stephen Zunes

Washington’s Battle Against America’s Veterans by Gerald Nicosia

Obama’s First Steps on Guantanamo by Joanne Mariner

Globalism vs Ethno-nationalism by Pat Buchanan

RE:RE:RE: What Blacks Are Really Celebrating by Richard Spencer

Military to Pledge Oath to Obama, Not the Constitution by Michelle Chang

LeftLiberty #1 -Call for Submissions 

Welcome, Antiwarriors by Charles Johnson

Obama and the Oddsmakers by Alexander Cockburn

The American Economy is Not Coming Back by Dave Lindorff

Gaza Will Survive by Subcomandante Marcos

Last Gasp of the Culture Wars? by David Rosen

If Deflation is Coming, Sell Your Gold by Lew Rockwell

The Misesian Case Against Keynes by Han Hermann Hoppe

The Power Elite is All Wet by Jeffrey Tucker

Elect the Cops by Dylan Hales

Increasing Even-Handedness in the Middle East by Glenn Greenwald

The Expanding War in Afghanistan by Warren Mass

Organizing National-Anarchist Networks by Bay Area National Anarchists

“Raise the Starry Plough On High” 

Rapist PIGS by Rad Geek

ALLiance is Seeking Submissions by Chris Lempa

Republican Albatross by Sheldon Richman

Give Bill Kristol’s New York Times Op-Ed Spot to Wendy McElroy by Brad Spangler

The Mafia is More Legitimate Than World Governments by Niccolo Adami

Updated News Digest January 25, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“It seems unlikely that many Americans will do other than breathe a long sigh of relief when George W. Bush finally leaves the White House. His farewell appearances last week were suitably bizarre, suggesting a man of limited capacity for sustained ratiocination, who, like many essentially weak people seeking to camouflage their weakness, views any admission of a mistake, or even a willingness to compromise or consider the views of another, as an unacceptable sign of the vulnerability he knows is there and doesn’t wish to acknowledge.

I’d love to see change I could believe in under a new president, and it’s worthwhile to suspend judgment for at least a bit. But the likelihood of an Obama administration actually reducing the U.S. footprint in the world seems rather low.”

                                                                                              -Alan Bock

The Trouble With Those “Shovel-Ready” Projects by Kevin Carson

Venezuelan and Argentine Influences on the Chicago Factory Occupation by Larry Gambone

James Bond on the Drug War by Roderick Long

Obama: Already Dropping the Ball on Palestine by Niccolo Adami

Stimulating Consumption Won’t Help the Economy by Sheldon Richman

Israel and the European Right by Paul Gottfried

Is Gaza the Beginning of World War Three? from the Trends Research Institute

Obama’s Economics by Stonewall

Four Surprises in Global Demography by Nicholas Eberstadt

Tales of Hard Times Reveals How Soft We’ve Become by Michael Deacon

The Findhorn Community  Watch and Find Out More 

War Criminal in Chief by Laurence Vance

No Debate, No Dissent by Glenn Greenwald

Getting Our Priorities Straight Joshua Frank interviewed by Scott Horton

Inauguration Day, A Day of Mourning by Justin Raimondo

The More Things Change by Alan Bock

How Bin Laden Bankrupted America by Jon Basil Utley

U.S. Jewish Peace Lobby Isolated on Gaza by Daniel Luban

Another War, Another Defeat by John J. Mearsheimer

Punishing the Palestinians by Ralph Nader

Gaza Agonistes by Eric Alterman

Who’s in Charge-Obama, the Pentagon or Israel? by William Pfaff

Not Just Guantanamo by Joanne Mariner

How Will History Judge America’s 43rd President? by Gene Healy

Overseas, Expectations Build for Torture Prosecutions by Scott Horton

A Suicide Foretold: The Case of Israel by Immanuel Wallerstein

Reality in Gaza is Bad Enough by Robert Fisk

How Al-Jazeera  Helped Me Think Differently About the World by Eric Calderwood

The Stories of Torture Sounded Made Up. They Weren’t by Carol Leonnig

Close Guantanamo, End the Cuban Blockade by Eric Margolis

Ehud’s Poodle by Pat Buchanan

A Deadly Stimulus by Don Armentano

Obamanomics Will Fail by Mike Rozeff

The National Anthem of the U.S.S.A. by Joshua Snyder

Predictions About the Obama Administration by Mike Rozeff

False Dawn by Justin Raimondo

The Myth of Israel’s Strategic Genius by Stephen Walt

Obama Offers Internationalist Vision by Jim Lobe

Obama’s Strategic Wasteland by Jeff Huber

Introducing the CIA to the Constitution by Nat Hentoff

Israel Wanted a Humanitarian Crisis by Ben White

Prosecute the Torturers by Glenn Greenwald

An Interview with Alex Jones from Russia Today

An Interview with Malik Zulu Shabazz of the New Black Panther Party 

Tribal Anarchy vs The State by Stefan Blankertz

Is GOP Still a National Party? by Pat Buchanan

Young Americans for Liberty by Jack Hunter

Israel and US by Tom Piatak

Israel’s Inalienable Rights by Charles Glass

Russian Anarchist Murdered by Porkupine Blog

Looking at the Wrong Depression and Finding the Wrong Solution 

Nothing Personal, Just Business by Patroon

Understanding Gaza by Gabriel Kolko

State Terrorism Against Gaza by Ralph Nader

 Archduke Wilhelm of Austria and Missed Opportunities by Ean Frick

The Pet Rock Presidency by Sean Jobst

Class Bias Against Poor Whites by Alan Travis

Seven of Nine: The Woman Who Created Obama by Sarah Gallick

Empire Undermines Tradition by Matthew Roberts

Another Real Estate Crisis is About to Hit by Paul Craig Roberts

Mandela’s Example for Obama by Martin Kelly

Health Insurance Before the Welfare State from the Independent Institute

In Defense of Internet Journalism by Kevin Carson

Chomsky, Inc. 

Steal This Journal 

The Death of Conservatism by Stonewall

The Democrats on Israel by Adriana Kojeve

The Gathering Storm Against the 2nd Amendment by Mike Gaddy

Fixing the International Monetary Disaster by Jesus Huerta de Soto

An American Mao?

Swiss Firefighters: A Living Rebuke to Right and Left by Geoffrey Wheatcroft

The Borders of Freedom of Opinion 

Death Threats Against Dutch Film Maker Should Be Condemned 

Israel’s Lies by Henry Siegman

Alex Jones Analyzes Barack Obama’s Inaugural Speech 

Norman Finkelstein on Gaza 

Mohawk Autonomous Zone by Martin Patriquin

Children Found with Bullets Lodged in Their Head by Topaz Amoore

U.S. Intel Nominee Lied About ’99 Massacre by Allan Nairn

A Neo-Reaganite Inaugural? by Pat Buchanan

Obama and Black Pride by Jack Hunter

The Minarchist Fallacy: It’s For Leftists, Too! 

Nazi Privatization by Kevin Carson

The Ghosts at Obama’s Side by Alexander Cockburn

The Freefalling Economy by P. Sainath

In Israel, Detachment from Reality is the Norm by Patrick Cockburn

Reasons for War? by Saul Landau

It’s Time to Free Leonard Peltier by Bob Fitraki and Harvey Wasserman

The Way Forward by Dave Lindorff

U.S. Foreign Policy Writ Small by Fred Reed

Obama is Wrong About Afghanistan by George Phillips

Mengele City? by Nick Evans

The Liberals Grand Bargain by Justin Raimondo

Investigate and Prosecute the Bush Administration by Doug Bandow

Obama Was Right to Halt Guantanamo Trials by Andy Worthington

The Return of Liberal Interventionism by Doug Bandow

So Far, Obama’s Missed the Point on Gaza by Robert Fisk

Plans in Place to Close Guantanamo-Eventually  by J.D. Tuccille

Guantanamo State of Mind by Jacob Sullum

Balkanizing Barack by Gordon N. Bardos

Pentagon 1, Obama 0 by Benjamin H. Friedman

Ideology and Polarization by Dain Fitzgerald

Hey World, Pick Up Our Tab by Peter Schiff

At Least They Didn’t Call Him Sue by William Norman Grigg

Monopoly Kills Creativity-Down with Intellectual Property by Jeffrey Tucker

Nationalizing Private Life: The Legacy of the Great War by Hunt Tooley

Huckleberry Finn and PC Insanity by John Lietchy

Darkness, Tyranny and Oppression by Jacob Hornberger

Richard Holbrooke: Obama’s Neocon by Joshua Frank

The Neocons: Always Wrong, But Never in Doubt by Murray Polner

Prohibition 3: The Candy Wars

Obama Dips His Hands in Blood by Tim Reid

Prosecute Bush! by Ivan Eland

Gaza: Worse Than An Earthquake by Kathy Kelly

Obama: Off to Good Start with Detainees? by Andy Worthington

New Era of American Leadership? by Gordon Prather

War Crimes Prosecutions Scott Horton interviewed by Scott Horton

US/Israeli Terrorism in Gaza Gareth Porter interviewed by Scott Horton

Lawyers Who Can Say No by Jacob Sullum

The Degeneration of the Imperial Legions from Christian Science Monitor

Asset Forfeiture Helps FBI’s Gambling, Jewel-Studded, Jerk-Offs by Jacob Sullum

In the Age of Obama by Justin Raimondo

Just a Question by Sheldon Richman

 

The State and the Banksters Reply

by Peter Bjorn Perls

As an old libertarian and anarchist, news like this is not a surprise to
me anymore, and neither should it be for others of like persuasion, but
for those not accustomed to cynicism against the Establishment, a lot of
reminders of the corruption in the circles of power continually needs to
be shown, as the latest, quote:

“Bernanke, speaking in London, said in his prepared remarks that the
nearly $800 billion plan being discussed by the incoming Obama
administration and the newly elected Congress “could provide a
significant boost to economic activity.” He did not comment on or
endorse any specifics of the nearly $800 billion.

But Bernanke cautioned that the plan is “unlikely to promote a lasting
recovery unless they are accompanied by strong measures to further
stabilize and strengthen the financial system.”

link:http://money.cnn.com/2009/01/13/news/economy/bernanke_speech/index.htm?postversion=2009011308

Same ‘ol Bernanke (same as the rest of the crowd of Keynesians) – weak
on the specifics on how to spend the gargantuan handouts that they take
for granted is needed to right the economy (likewise a vaguely defined
concept). But I digress; the point of the matter here is that the US
federal handouts to the financial institutions are now so blatantly
obvious that only the blind (usually from political persuasion; I’d add)
fail to see it. The politicians already pumped sums that are
astronomical to any working man and local community, and now we are told
it’s not enough? (Will we hear that again when the next round of
bailouts come, too?)

A few bullet points to illustrate how the state works for the friends of
those in power and not those it allegedly serves – the public;

* Citigroup’s stock was busy running into the group two months back, but
recieved a big bag of cash from the feds, not only making the bankers
happy because they could stay in business for a while, but also a
Alwaleed bin Talal of Saudi royalty happened to buy up a large wad of
stock shortly before the cash infusion announcement, thus making himself
an even billion dollars in the process.

link:http://current.com/items/89559833/saudi_prince_profits_from_us_taxpayer_bailout_of_citigroup.htm

* The Feds propped up the banks to keep people borrowing and spending,
but Henry Paulson had to realize that the money that went to the banks
did not go to lending; it was spent on the banks buying each other out,
quote:

“Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson has said the money was aimed at
rebuilding banks’ reserves so that they would resume more normal lending
practices. But reports then surfaced that bankers might instead use the
money to buy other banks. Indeed, the government approved PNC Financial
Services Group Inc. to receive $7.7 billion in return for company stock
and, at the same time, PNC said it was acquiring National City Corp. for
$5.58 billion.”

(source: Yahoo News, article since deleted)

Then there is the case of the dying US automobile industry that went to
Capitol Hill with tears on their cheeks to beg for handouts for
themselves; after 3 decades of ever worsening business management and
ever worsening general quality of its produce; they had to go back home
two times, but as they say, three’s a charm, and they finally got their
double-digit-billion-bailout in the form of a loan. (Any bets on if it
will ever be paid back?)

Story of note why the “Big Three” bailout is foolish anyhow:

link:http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2008/11/18/93514/227

And now the latest from Bernanke, as quoted above, saying in effect that
the already-huge bailouts for banks and industry are not enough. Now, a
few comments.

First, I’m not saying that banking is a non-productive endavour, as some
other establishment critics and typically reds would have it. But it is
obvious that the federal-corporate banking symbiosis today serves the
interests of politicians and businessmen more than that of the public
and the regular customers of the banks.

Second, the banks and financial institutions are being bailed out
because they are already a privileged class; the ability to create
credit from thin air (which is what the banks do; that is part of their
business) is not something anybody can do. Only politically
rubber-stamped institutions can do that, and thus it is a very valuable
enterprise, which again means that there is a struggle to get such a
privilege. Those who pay, however, is the public, specifically the
working public, and in more than one way. (Can you survive as a “normal
citizen” in society today without a bank account? Can you be on a
company payroll without having an account at a bank?)

Third, it is a quite human, and I might add, social thing, to help your
friends and relatives, but when this cooperation takes place in the
halls of power (which is the entire point of what I’m writing here; of
course it does!), it’s happening at your expense. The pillars of a
corrupt establishment is being kept in place with your money.

(On the other hand, if you can somehow remain free of taxes, and thus
not contribute to this exploitative machinery, my hat is off to you!)

After the happenings of 2008, who can honestly say that they do not see
the nepotism of the back-and-forth exchanges between state and big
business, and how this does nothing good for themselves, their friends
and families?

Those that don’t see it, are blind. Those who see, but make excuses for
it, are naive. But those who do see it, and do excuse for it, have a
duty to start working to end this state of affairs. Yes, it may not be
possible to do much, but at least stop participating in the lie; that is
the first step.

Updated News Digest January 18, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“In the republic of mediocrity, genius is dangerous. We need men with courage to speak and write their real thoughts, and to stand by their convictions, even to the very death. When the will defies fear, when duty throws the gauntlet down to fate, when honor scorns to compromise with death-that is heroism.”

                                                                                 – Robert Ingersoll

Fat Assed Neocon Slob Wants to Enslave American Youth to Kill Pakistanis

PIGS Caught on Video Murdering Innocent Civilian by Rad Geek

Punk Rock Bands Go on “Civil Disobedience” Tour 

Brad Spangler to Discuss Center 4 a Stateless Society on Live Radio 

If You’re in Richmond, March at the General Assembly on Wednesday

We Are All War Criminals by Francois Tremblay

Spain’s Last Anarchist 

Alliance Journal-new magazine from Chris Lempa 

The Coming Military Dictatorship in America by Gene Healy and Benjamin Friedman

The Revival of Local Alternative Currencies 

A Fresh Look at the Whiskey Rebellion by Carl Watner

Urban Warfare Training in Richmond 

The Paleos and the Peculiar Institution by Dylan Hales

Bush is a Bonehead by Pat Buchanan

America’s Shame by Paul Craig Roberts

Will the Government Turn to the Printing Press? by Paul Craig Roberts

The Coming Collapse of the Middle Class 

Oakland on Fire by Kara N. Tina

Russell Means Breaks the Silence on Obama by Brenda Norrell

From Vietnam to Gaza by Dave Lindorff

Economic Rescue from the Bottom Up 

The “Violence” of the Oscar Grant Riots 

Insurrection in San Francisco 

Economic Solutions from Mexico 

An Interview with Troy Southgate from Extreme Politics

Pure Propaganda by Philip Giraldi

Gaza Attack Was Long Planned by Jonathan Cook

Gaza is the Future  by Justin Raimondo

We Need an America First PAC to Counter the Israel Lobby by Juan Cole

Why Be Libertarian? by Murray Rothbard

Obama Acts Like a Neocon by Glenn Greenwald

Gaza and State Intellectuals by Karen Kwiatkowski

Repudiate the National Debt! by Murray Rothbard

Where Do Americans Stand on the Issues? from Media Matters

The Humiliation of America by Paul Craig Roberts

Pro-Life Death Merchants by Jack Hunter

America First by Jack Hunter

Prince Harry’s Hate Crime by Richard Spencer

Obama the Intellectual by Matthew Roberts

The GOP: More Marx Than Marx by Dylan Hales

No Defense by Dylan Hales

Murderous Oakland PIG Arrested 

Smash Things at Night 

Fattening the Rats by Dave Lindorff

Hezbollah Militants Chafe as Gaza Burns by Franklin Lamb

Washington or Mercer? by Patroon

Is Gaza the Revenge of Bush-Cheney? Eric Margolis interviewed by Lew Rockwell

Permanent Alliances with All, Friendship with None by Joshua Snyder

Obama Dines with Evil Neocons by Sam Stein

Half of Gazans are 13 or Younger by Dennis Kucinich

Richard Perle: Still Crazy After All These Years by Justin Raimondo

Why War? by Charles Pena

Israel Doesn’t Get Fourth Generation Warfare by Bill Lind

Bush’s Tortured Morality by Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite

Not All Jews Agree with Israel’s Gaza  Actions by Antony Loewenstein

Israel’s Free Ride Ends by Michelle Goldberg

Pro-Israel Rally Descends into Calls for Wiping Out Palestinians by Max Blumenthal

How the U.S. Magnified Palestinian Suffering by Norman and Matthew Olsen

Bailouts, Double Standards, Hypocrisy by Kevin Carson

Easing the Transition to an Alternative Economy by Kevin Carson

Is Social Conservatism Necessary? by James Kalb

I’ll Decline “the West” by Richard Spencer

Neocons Embrace Change by Richard Spencer

Virginia Takes Constitutional Convention Stage by Chuck Baldwin

Obama’s Marijuana Prohibition Acid Test by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman

Just Violence in Gaza? by Timothy Seidel

The State of Black America by Ron Jacobs

Obama and the Military-Industrial Complex by Karl Grossman

Zion Uber Alles 

Eradicating Hamas by Eric Margolis

Thomas Friedman: Terrorist Sympathizer by Glenn Greenwald

War on Terror Was Wrong by David Miliband

Communities Make Their Own Currencies 

What Does An Obama Administration Mean for Gun Rights? from the Independent Institute

Don’t the Secret Police Make You Feel Wonderful? by William Norman Grigg

Israel vs America by Justin Raimondo

Assessing the Bush Administration by Doug Bandow

It’s Hard to Be an Anti-Zionist Jew by Jeremy Sapienza

The End of an Error by Jack Hunter

The Israel Lobby Takes Off the Gloves by Taki Theodoracopulos

What Is Religion? by James Kalb

Israel, Ilana and the Paleos by Paul Gottfried

Israel, Ilana and I by Richard Spencer

Happy 200th, Pierre Joseph Proudhon 

On Distributism from No Third Solution

Alexander Cockburn Brings a Voice of Reason by Niccolo Adami

Hail to the Chief by Alexander Cockburn

Forecasting Obama by Joshua Frank

Prosecuting Bush and Cheney by Dave Lindorff

Who Runs America? by Brian Cloughley

The Facts About  Hamas and the War on Gaza by Norman Finkelstein

Republicans Staying the Course on Iraq by W. James Antle, III

Obama Should Seek Advice from Jimmy Carter by Ivan Eland

Is Ehud’s Poodle Acting Up? by Pat Buchanan

Letters from Gaza by Kenneth Ring

Israel and the United States by Frida Berrigan

Say No to Cops: The Case for Elimination and Reduction by William Buppert

A Real Discussion on TV of US Policy Towards Israel by Glenn Greenwald

Starbucks: A Zionist Entity  by Barbara Ferguson

 

 

                                             

Updated News Digest January 11, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“As a matter of priority the new generation of “Alternative” righties are decentralists and anti-imperialists first, and culture warriors second, if at all. To them the warfare state and erosion of civil liberties are vastly more important and relevant than the overturning of Roe v. Wade or the supposed “threat” of gay marriage. Furthermore, the primary cultural issue of interest to them is probably the decriminalization of marijuana, an issue where the paleo-friendly New Right of the 80’s would have been unsympathetic at best. ”

                                                                             -Dylan Hales

McGovern and the Right by Dylan Hales

Dumb is the New Smart by Robert Weissberg

Time to End the Second Prohibition by Charles Glass

The American Puppet State by Paul Craig Roberts

Will There Be a Recovery? by Paul Craig Roberts

Anarchy 101 by Wally Conger

Ecuador Repudiates Foreign Debt: It’s About Time by Kevin Carson

The Non-Aggression Principle and the Pauline Principle from LiberaLaw

Enforcing Rights in a Stateless Society from LiberaLaw

The Holocaust of Gaza 

The Creation of the Second Great Depression by Ron Paul

On Hamas Vs. Israel by Rad Geek

A Historical Perspective on the Events in Greece by Francois Tremblay

Bargaining Power from LiberaLaw

Proudhon on Justice and the Origin of Ideas by Shawn Wilbur

It’s All One Big Lie by Pam Martens

The Gaza Bloodbath  by Mike Whitney

Israel is Immune From Criticism by Brian Cloughley

Lawrence Auster Attacking Taki by Red Phillips

Fort Collins Banner Drop in Solidarity with Greek Uprising 

What’s Happening in Gaza? by Eric Margolis

Obama is Bush III by Kevin Gutzman

Fred Reed is a Breath of Fresh Air by Doug French

American Soviet TV and the Secret Police by Becky Akers

Bombing the Other by Glenn Greenwald

The Eco-Chicken Littles by Vin Suprynowicz

Rationalizing Gaza  by Justin Raimondo

Have Bush and the Neocons Ruined It for the Israelis? by Juan Cole

Pity the Poor Neocons by Robert Parry

Military Keynesianism to the Rescue? by Robert Higgs

Top Five Lies About Israel’s Assault on Gaza by Jeremy R. Hammond

Obama’s Bay of Pigs by Michael Carmichael

The Afghan Quagmire by Bob Herbert

Why Aren’t More Americans Dancing to Israel’s Tune? by Max Blumenthal

Bush’s Last War Crime by Robert Dreyfuss

Attack on Gaza: As Usual U.S., Media, Liberals Silent by Greg Mitchell

Forces of Totalitarian Humanist Therapeutic Statism Move in Virginia

The Case Against Adolescence by Doug French

Good News for 4GW Fighters, Bad News for States by William Lind

Baltimore Police Shield Identity of PIGS Who Kill and Maim Citizens 

Dying to Win Robert A. Pape Interviewed by Scott Horton

The Empire Shrugs by Alan Bock

Israel Attacks Schools, Ambulances by Mel Frykberg

The Real Value of the Standing Army by Jacob Hornberger

Neoconservatism in the Obama Age by Patrick Krey

Why Do So Few Speak Up for Gaza? by Robert Scheer

Why Do They Hate the West So Much, They Will Ask by Robert Fisk

Many Americans Do Love Their Police State by J. D. Tuccille

Cut the Pentagon ‘Til It’s a Triangle by John Zmirak

Advertising is Rape by Robert Stacy McCain

The Vermont Gold Train Token: Alternative to Financial Disaster by Robert Gray

The End of White America? by Hua Hsu

“America Should Be On Neither Side” by Ron Paul

What Kind of Security Will This Barbarism Bring Israel? by Saree Makdisi

Bend Over, Professor Dershowiz, It’s Time for Your Checkup by Franklin Lamb

America’s Other Glorious War by William Blum

Subcomandante’s Marcos’ Speech on Gaza

PIGS Kill Unarmed Man in His Driveway 

PIGS Attack Mentally Handicapped Woman 

PIGS Kill Man Already in Custody

Therapeutic Statist General Says No on Marijuana Legalization 

Sheriff Jailed for Starvation of Inmates

Resistance to the PIGS in Oakland

Ending Tyranny Without Violence by Murray Rothbard

America, Land of Opportunity by Don Cooper

Do You Have the Guts to Be a Gun Owner? by Mike Gaddy

The Bubble of Middle East Dominance by William Norman Grigg

The Department of Injustice by Glenn Greenwald

Making Wall Street More Crooked by Bob Murphy

How to Read a Society by Theodore Dalrymple

Holocaust Denied by John Pilger

The Lessons of Gaza by Andrew Bacevich

Neoconservatism Dies in Gaza by Juan Cole

Israel’s Looming Catastrophe by Robert Parry

Obama: Listen to Iraqi Opinion by Eric Stoner

This Brutality Will Never Break Our Will to be Free by Khalid Mish’al

Obama May Follow Bush’s Foreign Policy by Stephen Kinzer

Right and Left, Diaspora Jews More Critical of Israel Than Ever by Anshel Pfeffer

Obama Is Losing A Battle He Doesn’t Know He’s In by Simon Tisball

The Difficulty of Being an Informed American by Paul Craig Roberts

A Damn Foolish Thing: Why Israel Loses Asymmetric Wars by Richard Spencer

Israel: The Bernid Madoff of Countries by Taki Theodoracopulos

Weyrich and Huntington: Rebels of the Establishment by Marcus Epstein

A War of Democracies by Grant Havers

Porn: A Cherished American Industry by Richard Spencer

Response to Lawrence Auster by Paul Gottfried

Two Cheers for George McGovern? by Daniel McCarthy

McGovern and the Neocons by Dylan Hales

Can Anyone Ever Consent to the State? by Rad Geek

Rebellion 

Montreal Activists Evict Israeli Consulate 

New National-Anarchist Website for Australia/New Zealand

An Interview with French New Right Intellectual Christian Bouchet

Anarchist Beach Cleaning from Bay Area National Anarchists

We Need Constitutional, Not Just Economic, Recovery by Paul Craig Roberts

Andrew Sullivan: Israeli Stooge by Justin Raimondo

Oakland Anti-PIG Insurrection Continues 

The Real Global Warming Threat by David Gordon

The Inevitable U.S. Defeat in Afghanistan by Ron Shirtz

The Same Old Change by Justin Raimondo

An Unnecessary War by Jimmy Carter

The Ten Biggest Problems Facing African-Americans Today from AfroChat

R.I.P. Ron Asheton

Living Through New Deal II by Lew Rockwell

Israel is Committing War Crimes by George E. Bisharat

We Can No Longer Afford the Empire by Ivan Eland

Winners and Losers in the Gaza Strip by Jesse Walker

Democrats/Republicans Cheer for Israel’s War by Glenn Greenwald

Set Up Your Own Cooperative Community 

Our World Needs a Klaatu Nikto by Flavio Goncalves

Counterattacking the Smearbund by Paul Gottfried

Inflation as Income Distribution by Sheldon Richman

It’s Time to Bring Back the Gold Standard by Thomas N. Naylor

Why Greek Youths Took to the Street by Valia Kaimaki

Oakland’s Not for Burning by George Ciccariello-Maher

Israel’s Onslaught on Gaza: Criminal and Stupid by Alexander Cockburn

New Orleans PIGS Shoot Man 12 Times in the Back 

Starbucks Vs the IWW 

Deliberative vs Participatory Democracy and the Role of the News Media by Dain Fitzgerald

The Kind of Anarchist Movement I'd Like to See 2

In a previous post, I outlined my view that the radicals from the 60s  have won on virtually every issue, and that the kinds of values associated with 60s radicals aren’ t all that radical anymore, but are actually rather mainstream and normal. Given the demise of Communism and the institutionalization of both social democracy and 60s-era cultural politics, it would seem that a new direction for radicals is necessary, and that such efforts would likely emerge from one or another of the libertarian camps. The surprisingly energetic nature of the Ron Paul campaign in late 2007 and early 2008 is symptomatic of this.

For some time, I held to the position that before there could be a serious anti-state movement there first needed to be a more solid intellectual foundation for anti-state radicals. At the time, libertarianism was limited largely to the bourgeoisie economics of the libertarian-right, and the warmed over Marxism, both economic and cultural, of the left-wing anarchists. More specifically, I realized that an effective radical anti-statist movement would have to have as its primary targets the forces of the State, particularly the police state that taken control of American society over the past few decades, the economic arm of the State, which is the corporate and banking system whose activities have also grown more pernicious in recent years, and lastly the American Empire, which is responsible for roughly 8 million deaths over the last 60 years of its existence. Unfortunately, most of the anti-state movements were fixated on other issues, whether the welfare state for right-libertarians or traditional forms of social prejudice (“racism, sexism, homophobia”) for much of the libertarian left.

To be sure, there have been happy exceptions. One of these in the paleolibertarian movement, which is far more radical in its critique of the State and its emanations that most of its classical liberal counterparts. Another is the militia movement of the 1990s, which was big on attitude but unfortunately short on intellectual substance. Still another is National-Anarchism, which offers potential correctives to various deficiencies in other forms of anti-authoritarian thought.  I have considered all of these to be embryos for a new kind of radicalism that might possibly emerge at some point in the future.

Just as important, however, has been the emergence of some major theoretical works, some of them from outside the various libertarian milieus, that can inform both our ideological and our strategic outlook in the future. One of these is Martin Van Creveld’s work on the origins and demise of the nation-state system. Still another is Bill Bishop’s “The Big Sort,” which indicates that Americans are creating the sociological infrastructure for a future anarcho-pluralist system, and they’re doing it all on their own, without any imput from anarchists. Additionally, we have functional models of what the politics of anarcho-pluralism might actually be in practice in the form of the many micronations currently in existence, for instance, Iceland, Liechtestein, Monaco, Luxemborg and Andorra, and the many functional intentional communities from around the world, ranging from Israel’s kibbutzim to South Africa’s Orania community.

On economic matters, the 21st century now has its own Proudhon in the person of Kevin Carson, whose work provides a magnificent continuation and synthesis of the classical anarchists, Marx, the Austrians, Rothbard, the decentralists, the distributists and others who have come before. Finally, anarchists can answer Keynes and Friedman, Marx and Mises. We also have functional alternative economic models in the form of Brazil’s Semco and Spain’s Mondragon cooperative federation.

On military matters, we have “fourth generation warfare” theory of the kind advanced by Van Creveld and Bill Lind, and a working model of a fourth generation army and social infrastructure in the form of Hezbollah. We also have others who are tired of the “culture war” psychology that dominates much of the Right and Left alike, and is seeking out something more appropriately called “culture peace,” including Kirkpatrick Sale’s pan-secessionist movement and the national-anarchists, both of which are tendenies that recognize the legitimacy of a plurality of cultural foundations and value systems, as opposed to the totalitarianism implicit in both imperialism and left-wing universalism. Likewise, the Americans for Self-Determination Plan offers a constructive “third way” beyond both old-fashioned racism and the totalitarianism of modern liberal “anti-racism.”

The various manifestations of the modern states have already been subject to penetrating critiques. Aldous Huxley and to some degree George Orwell predicted what modern states would become, and the core features of these states-therapeutism, managerialism, mass democracy, military humanism-have been dissected by thinkers as diverse as Hans Hermann Hoppe, Thomas Szasz, Noam Chomsky, Michele Foucault, James Burnham, James Bovard, Richard Lawrence Miller, Erick von Kuehnelt-Leddihn, Murray Rothbard, James Kalb, C.S. Lewis, Hannah Arendt, Paul Gottfried and Alain De Benoist.

An effort to synthesize libertarian anti-statism and class analysis has emerged in the works of Kevin Carson, Walter Williams on race issues, Charles Johnson, Shawn Wilbur and others. No less respectable a figure as Vincent Bugliosi has brought forth a compilation of compelling evidence that George W. Bush and his associates deliberately went to war in Iraq under fraudulent pretenses and deliberately mishandled the war against Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. James Petras from the Left and John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt from the Center have produced comprehensive works documenting Israeli domination of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, and they have done so without relying on the anti-Semitic conspiracy theories of past times.

Another work that needs to be revisited is Walter Block’s classic “Defending the Undefendable.” In my own writings, I have mentioned a large number of political, cultural and economic scapegoats and outgroups that lack political representation, and might well be cultivated as constituent groups for a future anti-state movement. Similarly, now that conservatism, which claims to be the voice of opposition to “big government,”  is in shambles, at least some of the more radical or sincere constituents for conservatism might well be steered towards some sort of crypto-anarchism.

Ultimately, the only way that anarchists can eventually gain enough influence to finally topple the State, Capital and Empire, or at least severely curtail these, is to achieve leadership positions in much larger popular organizations, economic enterprises and political coalitions. Recent events in Greece have shown the potential social power of relatively small organized cadre of anarchists.  So how do we get this revolution going?

Cultural Radicalism Beyond Political Correctness 2

I’ve written rather critically of the cultural Left in the past. I do this for two primary reasons: 1) my view that left-wing concerns about matters like oppression of racial minorities, women, homosexuals, et al, while rooted in legitimate concerns and historical realities, have metamorphed into a new kind of authoritarianism, intolerance, and dogmatic fanaticism that is only now starting to become prevalent and will likely become more predatory in the future; and 2) my view that the contemporary emphasis on cultural politics from the Left has proven to be extremely destructive to the broader struggles against the forces of State, Capital and Empire.

I have had many brickbats thrown at me because I hold these positions. Some of the criticism on these matters I have received is rooted in simple disagreement or honest misunderstanding. Yet, much of the more vociferous hostility I have encountered seems to be rooted in dishonesty, mendacity, and hysteria, thereby proving my point.  I’m going to outline what I consider to be  the “proper” positions on cultural politics for libertarian radicals in the contemporary era. I say “proper,” in the sense of conformity to actual, tangible facts, relevance to the types of societies we find ourselves in, and the relationship of such questions to broader issues.

In looking around for examples of how the cultural Left typically thinks, an excellent example is a pamphlet in my possession published by a left-wing anarchist “collective” in my local community in 2002. I’m going to quote extensively from this pamphlet, and offer my own thoughts in response. The folks associated with this collective are very good people, some of whom I’ve known for over ten years, who have supported various projects of my own, whom I’ve appeared on television with, and who do very good work on many issues. In no way is any criticism I offer meant to convey hostility or personal attacks.  The first point of this left-wing anarchist manifesto calls “For An End to White Supremacy”:

We live in a culture that was founded upon the slavery of Africans, the genocide of indigenous people, and the brutal exploitation of people of color.

No disagreement so far, though there was plenty of “brutal exploitation” of white labor during early American history as well.

Since our culture has not come to terms with its white supremacist past we continue to live in a white supremacist present based upon the unrelenting economic exploitation of people of color, the mass imprisonment of black and Latino youth, and the privileging of white people and their value systems. Behind the creation and perpetuation of this white Euro-centric status quo is the drive to create profitable capitalist empire.

I thoroughly disagree that we are in a “white supremacist present” in the contemporary United States, at least as far as historic American “white supremacy” is concerned. If that were the case, a black man could not be elected President, people would not lose their jobs or public figures would not be subject to relentless opprobrium for perceived racist utterances. Nor would features such as affirmative action or sensitivity training be the institutional norms that they have become. Are people of color really subject to “unrelenting economic exploitation”? The urban underclass, which is mostly black and Hispanic, falls into this category, but so does the rural white lumenproletariat. What about the black middle class? What about the black professional class or wealthy, upper class blacks?

White people need to know that allowing people of color marginal participation in the dominant white culture is not true freedom.

The problem with a statement like this is that it ignores demographic realities. Blacks are only 12.5% of the U.S. population, so it is unlikely that blacks are ever going to be dominant or a numerical majority in institutions or social organizations. The exception would be those geographical areas where blacks are a demographic majority, and in large American cities where that is the case, black dominated local governments are quite frequently found.

People of color in North America have historically resisted their oppression and colonization by any and all means necessary. From slave revolts to riots against the police to union organizing to movements for control of their own destinies they have resisted their oppressors. The white status quo has historically conceded only what was necessary  to preserve their power and prevent the emergence of a revolutionary mass movement against white domination.

There’s no mention of what a “revolutionary mass movement against white domination” would actually involve.  So long as whites are a demographic majority, there’s only three possible ways to avoid “white domination.” One would simply be to import large numbers of non-white immigrants to such a degree that whites would no longer be a majority. Indeed, this seems to be one of the reason why the Left is rather enthusiastic about mass immigration. Yet, the consequences of such an action are likely to be quite severe. Historically, genuinely multicultural/multiethnic societies tend to be rather unstable and prone to outbursts of intercommunal violence. Oppression of minorities by majorities becomes less of an issue than persistent strife and even bloodshed between contending racial/ethnic power groups attempting to get the political upperhand. Another method might be to grant minorities political and economic privileges and power beyond that of their actual numbers. This has been done through such measures as antidiscrimination laws, affirmative action, electoral redistricting so as to guarantee a certain number of minority legislators, quotas and set asides, school “busing” policies, and many other such measures that are too numerous to mention. Yet, in spite of all of this, minority and/or left-wing claims of inequality still persist.

The third alternative may well prove to be the most satisfactory one. Towards the end of his life, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was apparently moving towards the idea of an independent black nation in North America, for the sake of achieving economic parity with the wider white society. Indeed, the level of wealth in the black community is already such that if black Americans were an independent nation, they would be one of the world’s more prosperous nations, comparable to many European or the more advanced Asian nations. Perhaps black sovereignty, and reparations for that purpose, will be the next phase of the movement for civil rights. The relative prosperity of black Americans may well be an obstacle to white embracement of reparations, as no living Americans ever owned slaves, and many were not even born when Jim Crow when still in effect. Still, there’s no denying that such past policies have prevented black prosperity of today from being what it otherwise would have been. If reparations were combined with elimination of statist social engineering policies concerning race relations, perhaps whites would not be as resistant.

We wholeheartedly support the needs and desires of people of color to organize in their own communities and workplaces free from the intrusion of the guilt-ridden consciences of white radicals. We recognize the ability of people of color to self determine their course in the world. People within the — — Collective who have white skin privileges will stand as allies and work in coalitions with people of color, when and only if, the people of color involved so desire.

Absolutely. I think the key phrase here is “when and only if, the people of color involved so desire.” Most radical groups in North American are predominately white, often exclusively so. The more rhetorically “anti-racist” they are the more all-white they seem to be. Racial minorities in North America who are politically motivated typically tend to prefer their own, separate political organizations. Some of these are obviously more about getting a bigger piece of the System, rather than overthrowing the System. But others aren’t, and it would seem the proper course of action would be to simply recognize and, when feasible, collaborate with black nationalists and related tendencies when mutually beneficial, with everyone otherwise going their own way. The emergence of groups such as Anarchist People of Color, the Lakota Republic, or the Pan-African International Movement would seem to be a positive development along these lines.

Another plank in my anarchist friends’ manifesto reads “For An End to All the Tentacles of the Patriarchy”:

We aim to shape a society based on equality, mutual respect, celebration of difference, and freedom from dominant patriarchal values and behaviors. Our society places value on labor, politics, and culture that benefits men, heterosexuals, and people who don’t bend the gender they were assigned at birth. Women, transgendered people…transvestites…transexuals…butch women…and feminine males..intersexed people… and sexual minorities (gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, etc. are in different ways oppressed by a patriarchal system that privilges the masculine, the “normative” heterosexual, and the “appropriately” gendered.

I think some qualification is in order here. As Justin Raimondo points out, certain sectors of the homosexual population are quite successful and prosperous. It’s also true that some within the “gay rights” movement have an authoritarian and destructive agenda of their own. Still, if freedom or liberty or anarchy means anything, it ought to mean the right to be different or to be a non-conformist, and there are some people who would not give a “sexual minority” a fair shake no matter what. While there’s always going to be a certain price attached to being “different,” as that’s the way human nature and human societies actually work, it is true that oppressions of this type have long been overlooked. There are religious non-conformists that have been persecuted in American history to various degrees-Quakers, Antinomians, Mormons, “witches,” Jehovah’s Witnesses, Moonies, Branch Davidians. There exists such groups today on the cultural level (drug users, for instance).  No reason exists why the oppression of sexual /gender outgroups cannot be opposed with the same vigor with which one might oppose religious persecution.

The patriarchy manifests itself in many visible ways; from the disparity of earning power between women and men…

There are reasons for this besides rank misogyny but there’s no identifiable reason why there cannot be a meritocracy whereby individual recognition is based on personal achievement and ability rather than group characteristics like gender. One of my favorite examples of such are the resistance movements in Latin America. Twenty percent of the FMLN of El Salvador’s fighting forces in the 1980s were females, and there were even all-female military units. At times, one third of the FARC of Colombia’s forces have been teenaged girls, and when it comes to leadership roles, there’s no denying the place of leaders like Lucy Parsons, Emma Goldman or Voltairine de Cleyre in the anarchist pantheon. Some of the most ferocious fighters in China’s Tai Ping rebellion in the 19th century were female warriors.

…to brutal hate crimes against queer and trans people…

Certainly, such crimes are despicable, yet they are only a very small portion of all the violent crime that occurs in America. The people who perpetrate such actions are not honored by society. Such actions often become national scandals and the perpetrators subject to arrest and lengthy terms of imprisonment. However, just as some people commit other acts of murder, robbery or rape inspite of laws, arrests and prosecutions ostensibly designed to prevent such behavior, “sexual minorities” continue to be victimized in such ways at times as well. Perhaps the Pink Pistols are the solution?

…to the inaccessibility of hormones and surgery for transsexual people…

Very few people today realize that the polio vaccine was developed without state funding. Instead, it was developed through a private foundation founded by FDR, with funds provided by the March of Dimes. Perhaps there could also be a “March of Dollars” to generate funding for gender reassignment surgery for trans people?

…to the constant fear of violence that many women feel on the streets…

The obvious solution here is more women who are skilled and trained in the use of weapons, including firearms, for self-defense, and the repeal of laws restricting self-defense. This should be an issue where anti-rape and anti-sex crime feminists and conservative gun rights activists can find common ground.

Simultaneously, the patriarchy operates in many “invisible” ways; from the way that we speak and interact intimately…

Sorry, but “intimate” relationships are a matter of interpersonal relations, whatever the issues that arise, not political matters.

…to the self loathing that many queer, intersexed people, transgendered people and women feel…

Psychological peace has to come from within. If you look to others or to society to provide it, you’ll be waiting a long time. It’s as simple as that.

…to eating disorders caused by sexist beauty standards…

Again, self-acceptance comes from within, not from without. All societies have “beauty standards” of some sort. An acquaintance of mine who is a specialist in Latin American history tells me the Mayans thought crossed-eyes were attractive. In some cultures, “plump” women are considered attractive. Such variations we will always have with us.

…to the feeling of entitlement that people socialized as male often feel…

And not just “people socialized as male.” The assholes ye shall always have with you.

As a first order of business, cultural radicals need to get past their tendency to act with reflexive hysteria whenever “conservative” social views or opinions not in line with left-wing orthodoxy are presented or expressed. The dichotomy between “change” and “tradition” or “reactionary” and “progressive” will always exist on some level. Any genuine libertarian philosophy must have freedom of thought, opinion, speech and honest and open debate as a foremost principle. Sean Gabb of the Libertarian Alliance describes the intellectual atmosphere of Hans Hoppe’s annual gathering of the Property and Freedom Society in Bodrum, Turkey:

These conferences provide a time and a place where nothing is off limits. There are no forbidden subjects, no polite suggestions that whatever is being loudly debated over dinner by the swimming pool might be “inappropriate”. The only rule is the obvious one—that you listen to the other side before making reply.

These are conferences where social conservatives sit down with anarcho-libertarians, where Czechs and Chinese discuss where history went wrong, where English is the preferred language, but a knowledge of half a dozen other languages will frequently come in handy.

They are also conferences useful for what everyone nowadays describes blandly as networking, but what the old Marxists, with a more sinister and accurate turn of phrase, called “cadre building”. It is in Bodrum, every May, that the connections and ideas that will be the future of the libertarian movement are first to be perceived.

And so it should be.

Updated News Digest January 4, 2009 Reply

Quote of the Week:

All violence consists in some people forcing others, under threat of suffering or death, to do what they do not want to do. I sit on a man’s back, choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am very sorry for him and wish to ease his lot by all possible means – except by getting off his back. Government is an association of men who do violence to the rest of us.”

-Leo Tolsoy

“The first step in dealing with violent psychopaths is to stop electing them.”

-Les Antman

NEW KEVIN CARSON BOOK NOW AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON!!

Industrial Policy: New Wine in Old Bottles by Kevin Carson

U.S. Polycracy: The Frightening Growth of the State by Ron Shirtz

Sue the P.C. Inquisitors for Libel? by Walter Block

Obama on the Attack on Gaza: “No Comment” by Joshua Frank

Genocide in the French Revolution by Henry Samuel

The State: Omnicompetent or Incompetent? by Theodore Dalrymple

Marty Peretz and the American Political Consensus on Israel by Glenn Greenwald

“Gaza Strike is Not Against Hamas, it’s Against all Palestinians” by Amira Hass

High Noon for the Israel Lobby by Phillip Weiss

Little Baghdad in Gaza by Amira Hass

Rumsfeld’s Legacy Andrew Cockburn interviewed by Scott Horton, Part One

Rumsfeld: War Criminal Andrew Cockburn interviewed by Scott Horton, Part Two

The Politics of the Gaza Massacre by Justin Raimondo

Top Ten Myths About Iraq, 2008 by Juan Cole

Bush Continues to Inflame Islamic Terrorism by Ivan Eland

Bush Winks at Israel’s Slaughter in Gaza; Obama/Clinton Silent by Matthew Rothschild

Eartha Kitt: Antiwar Patriot by John Nichols

Does Israel Represent the Jewish People? by Dan Lieberman

Gorbachev’s Model for Obama by James Carroll

Attack on Gaza: Self-Defense or Mass Murder? by Greg Mitchell

The Neoconservatism of Obama’s Foreign Policy Cabinet by Josh Xiong

Bush and His Cronies Must Face a Reckoning by Jonathan Freedland

India: Let Kashmir Go by Bennett Ramberg

Pipeline Politics in Ukraine Boston Globe

Guantanamo Whistleblower Stephen Abraham interviewed by Andy Worthington

Delusions of Victory in Gaza by Zvi Barel

Obama Fiddles While Gaza Burns by Robert Dreyfuss

Bush: Still Delusional and Unrepentant by Austin Bramwell

All That Glitters: A Financial History of the World by David Gordon

May We No Longer Be Silent by Paul Craig Roberts

Israel and Ron Paul by Dylan Hales

Spot the Santa Imposter from Thus Spoke Belinsky

Forget Bretton Woods II-We Need a Gold Standard by Walker Todd

Israel’s Attempted Endgame in Gaza by Jennifer Loewenstein

Exception from Humanity: The War Against Palestine by George Salzman and Manuel Garcia, Jr.

The Ten Worst Corporations of 2008 by Robert Weissman

A Hunded Eyes for an Eye by Norman Solomon

What Exactly is Israel’s Mission? by Neve Gordon

The Banks Laugh All the Way to the Bank by Rob Larson

End of NeoLiberalism? Sorry, Not Yet by Patrick Bond

Russian Professor Predicts End of U.S. by Andrew Osborn

Like the Romans, So Go the Americans by Tim Case

Doctors Agree: Police Are Bad for Your Health

The Left, The Right and The State by Lew Rockwell

Pacifying Gaza by Ran HaCohen

Neocons, New York Times Want More War, Torture by Philip Giraldi

Bill White to Remain in Jail Until Trial

Virginia Senator Wants to Reform Prison System

Canadia Neocons by Larry Gambone

War: What’s It Good For? Proudhon on War and Peace by Shawn Wilbur

The Struggle Continues in Greece

Israeli Navy Attacks Gaza Relief Ship in International Waters

Rooting for the Overdog by Harrison Bergeron2

The Gaza Ghetto and Western Cant by Tariq Ali

Will Cheney Seek a Pardon? by Dave Lindorff

The End of the Green Party by John Walsh

A Blow Against the PC Inquisitors by Chris Clancy

Ron Paul in 2012?

KopBusters! Heroic Ex-PIG Atones for Past Sins

Israel’s Constant Crisis by Justin Raimondo

Why Lightning Hasn’t Struck Twice by Charles Pena

Somalia: The Forgotten Front of the War on Terror by Stephen Smith

Who’s Afraid of U.S.-Iran Detente by Muhammed Sahimi

Children and the Existence of Rights by Jan-Patrick Bollstrom

An Interview with Wendell Berry

Forward: A Magazine from Syria

Anarchist Philosopher Crispin Sartwell

The First Casualty of Israel’s War by Todd Honderich

What is Hamas, Really? by Ron Jacobs

Greece: Burn, Baby, Burn!

McGovern Beats Nixon by Daniel McCarthy

The Problem of Oligopoly from No Third Solution

George McGovern Conservatives by Paul Gottfried

The Subsidized Roads/Zoning Feedback Loop from Rationalitate

Proudhon on Justice as the Definition of Philosophy from Shawn Wilbur

More on Proudhon and Justice

The True Story Behind This War is One Israel is Not Telling by Johann Hari

The Loathsome Smearing of Israel’s Critics by Johann Hari

2009 is Going to be a Humdinger by Richard Spencer

2009: The More Things “Change”… by Jack Hunter

The Gaza Massacre by Taki Theodoracopulos

The Ten Best Survival Vehicles

The U.S. and Israel: George Washington Was Right by Glenn Greenwald

The Arrogant Self-Righteousness of Vichy Liberalism by L.K. Samuels

Compassionate Statism by Bill Butler

Stop Foreign Aid to Israel (and everywhere else!) by Jacob Hornberger

Torture, Slaughter and Lies by Brian Cloughley

War Will Not Bring Peace to Afghanistan by Deborah Storie

What Next on Israel/Gaza? Why Should Americans Care? by Daniel Levy

Gaza: Where Civilians Become Targets by Andrea Becker

Closing Guantanamo by Joanne Mariner

To a Nation Under Siege: Happy 2009 by Kelley Vlahos

Understanding Gaza by Tony Garon

Unfair and Unbalanced: The U.S. Response to Gaza by Wajahat Ali

Media Banned from Gaza as Humanitarian Crisis Esclatates by Mel Frykberg

Party to Murder by Chris Hedges

Cynthia McKinney: Anti-Imperialist Hero by Jeremy Sapienza

Obama Golfs While Gaza Burns

From Kansas City to Palestine: End All Occupations

Underreported Struggles from Around the World

If Hamas Did Not Exist by Jennifer Loewenstein

Blacks in Favor of the War on Blacks (the Drug War) by TGGP

Rebranding Anarchism from Bay Area National Anarchists

Two Police Shootings from AnarchoNation

Another Brutal Year for Liberty by Glenn Greenwald

Roads Without the State by Bart Frazier

Voluntary Government by Mike Rozeff

On Being An Israeli Arab by Charles Featherstone

Coming Soon: The Disunited States? by Doug Bandow

Huffington Post: Israeli-Occupied Territory by Justin Raimondo

The Real Goal of the Slaughter in Gaza by Jonathan Cook

Gaza Attacks: Murder with Impunity by Mustafa Qadri

So What Have the Palestinians Got to Complain About? by Mark Steel

Black Oak: A Journal of Mid-American Culture

Libertarians for Animal Rights

Save Your Candles-The Dark Ages Are Coming! by Justin Raimondo

What Became of Western Morality? by Paul Craig Roberts

Blago Raises the Stakes by Pat Buchanan

An Agorist Primer by Brad Spangler

Justice: On the Quality of the Philosophical Mind by Pierre Joseph Proudhon

Greek Uprising: Echoes of ’68 by Chris Spannos

Update on Lori Berenson

Greece: Reports from the New Year

Diary of 2008 by Alexander Cockburn

The Economy is Worse Than it Appears by P. Sainath

Retrieving an Asian American Anarchist Tradition by Jane Mee Wong

Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright by Dee C. Lubell

Against Head Shop Raids by Norm Kent

We Live to Tell the Story by Cynthia  McKinney

Obama, Afghanistan and Israel by Robert Fantina

Does Law Require Legislation? by Murray Rothbard

Born at Wounded Knee by William Norman Grigg

The Climate Scammer Vs. Asthmatics by Vin Suprynowicz

Obama’s Black Widow by Barack Obama

Politics and the English Language by George Orwell

Is Israeli Policy Crazy? by Ivan Eland

Gaza Clouds Obama’s Prospects by Robert Scheer

The Political Consequences of Uncovering Genocide in Canada by Larry Gambone

Mad Max Rides Again from Wally Conger

The 60s Radicals Have Won-Now What? 16

Forty years ago, in the summer of 1968, leftist radicals fought the police outside the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Four years later, these same New Left forces went into the Democratic Party, seized control of its nomination process, and put George McGovern on the presidential ticket. The result was the biggest defeat of a major party candidate in modern American history, surpassing even the Goldwater and Mondale debacles of 1964 and 1984. For decades afterward, as the cultural Left consolidated its position in the Democratic Party (and other places, like the mass media and academia), the Democrats fuctioned as an often seemingly irrelevant opposition party, achieving victory only when they put up a couple of previously obscure frying pan governors as candidates.

As Republicans continued to win elections, the cry from the Right was a persistent, “The Sixities are over!” as if the radical Left had finally been vanquished for good. The Right was saying this as recently as 2004, when a former celebrity of the anti-Vietnam War movement, John Kerry, headed up the Democratic Party ticket, obtaining forty-eight percent of the vote. The radical Left was a fringe movement in the late 1960s, comprised of politically marginalized and socially outcast racial minorites, feminists, homosexuals, environmentalists, student radicals, leftist intellectuals, counterculturalists and the antiwar movement. Now, forty years later, what was marginal in 1968 is normal, mainstream and a cultural majority at the end of 2008.

The electoral victory of Barack Obama symbolizes the culmination of the long march from the streets of Chicago to full institutionalization of the radical Left of a previous era. That Obama, the individual, is more of a centrist than a leftist and was only a child in 1968 is less significant than what he represents. The 68ers have now seized the establishment and those who insisted the establishment could never be trusted have become the establishment.

On virtually every issue, the radical Left of the 1960s has either won or is in the process of winning. Racism? Despite the claims of “anti-racist” professionals who insist that Nazis are hiding under every bed, racism is at an all-time low. Blacks are only 12.5 percent of the U.S. population, and have a lengthy history as an outgroup, yet a black man wins the presidency. If hatred of blacks was particularly common, the Obama presidency would be impossible. Sexism? The woman who is to become the next Secretary of State is a woman who personally epitomizes 70s era feminism. The class of urban professional women has grown exponentially in recent decades. Even the vice-presidential candidate of the ostensibly “conservative” party was a woman, something that would have been virtually unthinkable forty years ago. A friend of mine’s mother was told as a child that her ambition to become a doctor was inappropriate because of her gender. Today, such sentiments would be laughable. As an illustration, the daughter of the Reverend Jerry Falwell, the man who for many symbolized anti-60s social conservatism, is now a physician. Gay rights? Homosexuals are more out of the closet, more socially integrated and have more “rights” than ever before. Anti-gay marriage referendums continue to pass, but do so by a smaller margin each time they come up for vote, with the real source of the conflict being generational in nature. The gay rights movement will eventually win on that issue as well. In the 1950s, homosexual relationships were considered a serious felony, like drug use in the present era. Today, not only does gay culture thrive in American cities, but even mainsteam bookstores like Barnes & Noble feature entire sections of literature devoted to gay issues. Such materials would likely have been banned under obscentity laws prior to the late 60s or early 70s.

Environmentalism? One of the world’s leading advocates of environmental causes, who obtained a Nobel Prize for his efforts, was very nearly elected President of the United States in 2000. Student radicalism? Many of the student rebels of the 1960s are now tenured academics, and there is no place in American society where the far Left is more secure than in academia. The sexual revolution? This has proven to be every bit as enduring as the civil rights revolution. Very few Americans even remember that some states had laws prohibiting contraceptive devices in the 1960s. Pornography and adult entertainment are now almost as mainstream as rock and rap music.

What about the antiwar movement? Surely, some might think, the present war in Iraq illustrates a failure of the radical Left is this area. Well, not really. In the early days of the Vietnam War, it was physically dangerous to oppose the war. Early antiwar protests typically required police protection, and the protestors were happy to have the cops present to ward off vigilante attacks from gung ho patriots. When the Gulf of Tonkin resolution was passed, it did so unanimously in the House of Representatives, and with only two dissenters in the Senate.

The number of casualties on the American side has yet to be one-tenth of what they were in Vietnam, yet public opinion turned against the war at the first site of blood, and this was in spite of the fact that September 11 had occurred only a few years earlier. It is politically impossible to impose war taxes, which is why the System is financing the war with inflation, deficit spending and foreign loans. The draft is likewise politically impossible and, indeed, the fact that there has been no draft since the Vietnam era marks yet another profound victory for the radical Left of the time. The present Iraq war, the public disgust generated by the neoconservatives and the Bush crowd, the national bankruptcy produced by Bush policies and the ineptness of the U.S. at fighting modern, “fourth generation” guerrilla armies have likely rendered further major imperial expeditions like Vietnam or Iraq impossible for the forseeable future. Yes, some piss ant Clintonesque imperialisms like those in Haiti or Kosovo may continue (with the added irony of former Vietnam War protestors defending these in the name of “humanitarian” war), and these will likely end only when the present regime finally dissolves, but the empire is on its last legs and its days are likely numbered. 

Indeed, even the “conservatism” of the present time is “liberal” compared to the pre-1960s period. Ronald Reagan did not govern appreciably to the right of John F. Kennedy. Reagan’s wars in Central America were simply a repeat of Kennedy’s Bay of Pigs and early involvement in Vietnam. George W. Bush has not governed to the right of Lyndon Johnson, presiding over the same kind of failed combination of joint extension of the warfare and welfare states as LBJ. The present day leadership of the Republican Party are the neoconservatives, who were on the far left end of the Democratic Party in the 1960s, the so-called “state department socialists.” What about the Religious Right? There is no group around more consistently demonized by the Left, and the literature of the Left is full of wild claims concerning an imminent theocratic coup by the Religious Right. The reality is that the Religious Right are simply convenient scapegoats for the Left and useful idiots for the Right. In the thirty years that the Religious Right has been an organized political movement, it has achieved nothing concerning any of its major issues. Putting prayer back into public schools? There are arguably more restrictions on religious practice and expression in state institutions than ever before. Banning abortion? A comprehensive anti-abortion referendum could not pass popular vote even in conservative South Dakota, and with Obama likely appointing the next members of the Supreme Court, Roe v. Wade is probably secure. Tuition tax credits or vouchers for private religious schools? It ain’t happening.

Jews are another traditional American outgroup, who were at times excluded from some social organizations and institutions until the civil rights era. Today, ethnic Jews own the majority of the major media companies, and the Israel Lobby is by far among the most powerful in the U.S government, essentially controlling U.S. policy in the Middle East. Yet, merely pointing out these facts invite sshrill accusations of the new “Scarlet A” of anti-Semitism. Prior to 1965, the U.S. maintained a racially restrictive immigration policy, which has since been liberalized remarkably. America was ninety percent white in 1960. Today, the U.S. is only sixty-eight percent white, and proposed policies to so much as deny welfare state benefits to illegal immigrants are denounced as racist and xenophobic.

Indeed, the only area where the radical Left is losing is in the area of so-called “criminal justice.” The U.S. police state has expanded dramatically in recent decades, and the “War on Drugs” and enforcement of other “consensual crime” laws have largely been the foundation of this, and has produced a corresponding prison-industrial complex. The execution rate in the U.S.  is also unusually high for a modern, democratic, industrialized nation. 

Though the Left has achieved complete or nearly complete victory on just about every issue, the Left will never admit as much. Sixties radicalism has become what any other movement becomes once it is institutionalized. The purpose of the Left today is to simply perpetuate its own existence and its own vested interests. For this reason, invisible armies of racists, sexists, homophobes and theocrats must constantly be said to be hiding behind every rock or tree. Heretics who dissent from left-wing orthodoxy on any number of matters must be constantly sought out for denunciation, repression or persecution.

This brings us to the question of what it really means to be a radical in 21st century North America. How “radical” is it to simply espouse anti-racism, feminism, gay rights, environmentalism and other run of the mill “progressive” causes? Are such things “radical” or are they mainstream, status quo and now establishmentarian in nature?

Is attacking the supposed “racism”  of a Don Imus or a James Watson really the act of a dissident? Or would it be the “radical” thing to do  to champion the rights of freedom of speech, religion or association for those with beliefs and opinions that dissent from liberal orthodoxy? Is it “radical” to persistently denounce groups like the Klan or Neo-Nazis that everyone hates anyway, or would it be more “radical” to expose supposed humanitarian do-gooders like the SPLC or the ADL for the frauds they are? What would be more cutting edge or “going against the flow,” to denounce “sexism” in the manner of an establishment liberal like Gloria Steinem or to defend academic and intellectual liberty for the likes of Walter Block? As far as defending outgroups goes, are groups like homosexuals, immigrants, minorities or women really “outgroups” in contemporary society? Would it not be far more radical and far more shocking to the establishment to defend gun-toting rural rednecks, drug-dealing inner-city ghetto dwellers, home schoolers and truants, practicioners of alternative medicine, strange religious sects, drug users, prostitutes and convicts, or avowedly separatist indigenous people like the Lakota Republic? What would be a greater outrage, a protest demonstration led by commie cults like the Workers World Party, or the formation of citizen militias, common law courts and secessionist movements? What would be more rebellious in nature, a recycling program or civil disobedience demanding the right to smoke in private bars and clubs, thereby giving the finger to the therapeutic state? What is more truly radical, agitating for gay marriage or a riot against the police state and prison-industrial complex similar to that which recently transpired in Greece?

The anwers to these questions are clear enough.

Updated News Digest December 28, 2008 Reply

Quote of the Week:

” I want to make a summing up, brief and to the point, but thorough. I have never suppressed a word in my books out of regard for other people and their prejudices.”

-John Henry MacKay

Tribal Anarchism, Part One by Death Sipheroth

Tribal Anarchism, Part Two

Tribal Anarchism, Part Three

Tribal Anarchism, Part Four

Tribal Anarchism, Part Five

Taxpayers in Revolt by Doug French

The Meaning of the National Debt by Bill Sardi

Madoff Explained by Lew Rockwell

Training Occupation Troops for America by William Norman Grigg

Cooling Is Warming by Vin Suprynowicz

How Somali Pirates Will Save US from a Depression by Tim Swanson

Put Virtue on Your VISA by John Zmirak

Pink Xmas by Paul Belien

George W. Bush, Protectionist by Pat Buchanan

Defending the Truly Undefendable by Marcus Epstein

Who’s the Christmas Grinch? by Paul Gottfried

Dropping the “C” Word by E. Christian Kopff

Banking Demystified by Doug French

A Badge of Dishonor by Paul Hein

Prohibition Increases Potency

Reason Sells Out to Inflationists

Herod’s Henchmen by Laurence Vance

America Needs to Go to Rehab by Eric Margolis

On the Death of Deep Throat by Pat Buchanan

A Tale of Two Giants by Dylan Hales

Reason Magazine, Populism and Ron Paul by Dylan Hales

Soldiers Against War by John Denson

Torture USA by Glenn Greenwald

Here Come the Progressives! by Justin Raimondo

The “Coup” That Wasn’t by Justin Raimondo

The Ten Lies of Dick Cheney by Andy Worthington

Feinstein: Bad Choice for Intel by Stephen Zunes

Where Have All the Neocons Gone? by Jacob Heilbrunn

Prosecuting an Outlaw Administration by Scott Horton

Dismantling the Imperial Presidency by Aziz Huq

Habeus Corpus Barely Saved by Sheldon Richman

Out of Sight, Out of Mind by Steven Chapman

Turning a Blind Eye to War Crimes by Brad Friedman

Cold War Shivers by Eric Walberg

Cheney’s Legacy of Deception by Dick Cheney

Israeli Spies’ ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ Card Philip Giraldi interviewed by Scott Horton

Iraq Wins the Iraq War Patrick Cockburn interviewed by Scott Horton

World War Two Was Bad for the Economy Thomas Woods interviewed by Scott Horton

Manufacturing Dissent Glen Greenwald interviewed by Scott Horton

Government Without Laws by Ralph Nader

Obama and the Graveyard of Empires by Gary Leupp

Nixon’s Cambodian Shock Treatment by Howard Lisnoff

The Bill of Rights: Killed in Action by the War on Drugs by Michael Dee

Welcome to Soup Kitchen America by Richard Rhames

Are Magazines a Thing of the Past?

A Road to Revolution? by Uri Gordon

Open Letter of Support for the Uprising in Greece

San Francisco Greek Solidarity March

An Interview with a Greek Anarchist

Republic Magazine: Issue # 11

Anarchy in Philadelphia

Rich Countries Carry Out 21st Century Land Grab by Debora Mackenzie

The History of Processed World

Open Capital: The Sharing of Risk and Reward

En Route to Military Rule by William Norman Grigg

Two Dangerous Bush-Cheney Myths by Robert Parry

Back to “Globalism” by Gordon Prather

100 Tons of US/Israeli Bombs Dropped on Gaza by Bay Area National Anarchists

The Medusa’s Head by Alexander Cockburn

Riots Push Greece to the Edge by Malcolm Brabant

Obama is Not a Latent Lefty by Paul Street

Left-Wing Authoritarianism lecture by Tammy Bruce