Cascadia: Interview with Casey Corcoran 18

Attack the System
Cascadia: Interview with Casey Corcoran

September 1, 2013

ATS editors Keith Preston and Vince Rinehart discuss Cascadia and bioregionalism with guest Casey Corcoran.

Topics include:

  • Defining Cascadia as a place rather than a political entity.
  • The ideas and history of bioregionalism as a movement.
  • The commonalities shared by colonized peoples.
  • The relationship between ecological crises and colonialism.
  • The need for food sovereignty.
  • How technological and ecological values can co-exist.
  • Why radical localism is the path to resistance.
  • The film “Occupied Cascadia.”

Links:

File type: MP3
Length: 1:26:01
Bitrate: 32kb/s

Download (right click, ‘save as’)

Email Keith:
kppgarv@mindspring.com

18 comments

  1. Pingback: Cascadia: Interview with Casey Corcoran | Occupied Cascadia

    • Well, Mr. Corcoran explicitly pointed out that several nations, some settler, others indigenous, live in the Cascadia region. Did you listen to the podcast, Mr. Faulk?

      But I’m more concerned with the implication that ARV is in the business of certifying “real” nations. Is attacking the global empire just not enough of a challenge for you?

  2. GRMA! Mr. Weiland. And FYI my opinions about nationhood and nationalism are my own. I am not associated with ARV. I do have some very strong opinions about this topic, and I’ll certainly spell it all out for anyone interested in my own time.

    I find it remarkable how ‘Nation’ has become such an unsettling word, and I’m just doing my best to be an unsettler.

    Add this to y’alls lexicon: “autonomous plurinational bioregions of cascadia” Quit kicking dead horses. Be human and get creative!

    • In the language of my oestfriesian ancestors, dor nich för!

      And FYI my opinions about nationhood and nationalism are my own. I am not associated with ARV.

      Of course! We all disagree on quite a lot of matters. What brings us together is the urgent need to address the empire, and everything else is IMHO an exercise in diplomatic relations between diverse sovereigns. Whether or not you’re an “associate” of ARV, we appreciate the critique and dialogue.

      That said, I thought you had a very cogent approach to nationalism, quite refreshing to see from somebody who hails from a more lefty orientation than many here. As a leftist myself I find the concept of nationalism far less troublesome when it is kept distinct and separate from “state”. The Left has had this 150+ year struggle with identity, from which nobody with any humility or honesty can possibly draw concrete conclusions above and beyond what we already knew about human behavior and “nature”.

      It’s just nice to see somebody start with man-in-history rather than man-in-theory, as Robert Anton Wilson would put it, and still posit a pluralist future where people can be both rooted in place without resigning oneself to a stifling conservatism.

  3. Maybe this is just my incipient anarcho-Maoism emerging, but my attitude towards these kinds of debates tends to be “Let a thousand flowers bloom!”

    I’m interested in promoting anarchist, libertarian, decentralist, anti-state, or anti-authoritarian movements generally irrespective of their other views or what they think of each other. Beyond that, I’m interested in promoting dissent generally, along with the overarching strategic concepts we talk about like pan-secessionism, until all of these currents collectively become a political majority.

    As these ideas grow and take roots in more and more corners, I suspect lots of different kinds of tendencies will start to grow up. There will be multiple currents within ATS, currents outside of ATS, and even anti-ATS tendencies who are into the wider concept of pan-secessionism or anarcho-pluralism. Likewise, currents may emerge that are middle class oriented, lumpenprole oriented, de classe oriented, left-wing, right-wing, pro-PC, anti-PC, pro-Cascadia, anti-Cascadia, pro-All Nations Party, anti-All Nations Party, and reflecting all kinds of cultural, ethnic, and religious identities.

    I do think that as movements of this type grow and expand they will come under increasing attacks by the state, who after all isn’t going to step down without a fight. All of the “grand alliance” theories I write about is ultimately about resisting those attacks when they start to come and working out common plans for what the post-System system will be without having a 100-faction civil war.

  4. Kind words Mr. Weiland. The equation of “nation” and “state” seems to be a root of most modern evil. A MAJOR pet peeve of mine. But watch who you’re calling a “lefty” 🙂

    And Mr. Keith, avoiding that “100-faction civil war” has been my motivating factor since the beginning. They’ve done that to us, getting us to fight each other, lifetime after lifetime now. This time has to be different.

    I’ve come to respect y’alls work and thought a great deal, honored to be “associated” actually. Screw the climate of fear held up by the Leftist overlords calling you free-thinkers “racist” all the time. D’fhéadfadh Dia logh a n-aineolas. Níl mé bán, tá mé nGael.

  5. “Let a thousand flowers bloom!”

    PROBLEM: Any nation blocks out another nation. Cascadia claims eastern oregon and eastern washington, which are nothing like the Seattle-Washington region. It combines two completely separate nations based on geography. It is mindless.

  6. At around in 33 min Casey mentions that quote “Empire” made Mesopotamia a desert. This absurd fallacy is common in left, Iraq is a desert because those “peaceful” hunter gatherers, the Mongols under Hulagu Khan raped the region killing about 1 million people in Baghdad and destroying the irrigation canals which had been in place since Sumerian times. The very reason why Iraq was not formerly a desert is that it was irrigated. The destruction of the irrigation canals, by hunter-gatherers, is the single most important reason why Iraq is a desert. If civilization makes a desert I think Casey needs to read up on Hammurabi’s Hanging Gardens of Babylon. So the moral of the story of Iraq is totally opposite of the green-fundies acount, civilization makes gardens; hunter-gatherers make deserts. Its also funny that he claims to reject the Christian apocalypticism of his parents but then turns to the green apocalypticism of Derrick Jensen which never seems to come true. Proves my point that leftists are just heretical Christians who are always trying to find a material apocalypse to replace the real one. I would take these people a lot more seriously if they actually gave up their own latent Christianity.

  7. Fair play Todd. I’ll admit to being indoctrinate by the Boasian/Levi-Strauss school of anthropology (via Zerzan/Jensen et. al.) which I doubt more and more as time goes on. I appreciate your comment. And then I will challenge you. I would say that “Culture” makes gardens, more than “cīvitās.” And then I would say that the Mongols were pastoralists, not hunter-gatherers. But then I don’t really believe in the “hunter-gatherer” of deterministic anthropology. So it was foreign invasion and colonial conquest that made a desert then: the removal of the “radical localists.”

    I know that Jensen is referring to the Epic of Gilgamesh. And I am also reminded of Solomon ordering felled Cedars from Hiram Abiff. So you must admit that the is a ‘mythos’ of deforesting the Near East that must have some kind of meaning. I came a cross a book called ‘Saharasia’ which seems rather fringe/alt-history, but it does address that there is evidence for an ecological regime change in the regions that eventually birthed the monotheistic religions. I am also aware that the current war of the Kurds (ancestrally Zoroastrian Medes) is happening near the Göbekli Tepe site, which somewhat destroys modernist anthropology. So where does that leave us?

    Well, I think you’re being too dualistic trying to turn the green-fundies on their head. I would say, places make cultures, foreign invasion destroys culture, and the result is ecological devastation. It doesn’t matter if the invaders are “civilized” or “savage.”

    I fully accept your critique that I jumped from one kind of apocalypticism to another. My bad. I’m recovering.

    That also reminds me that Georges Sorel “also saw Marxism as closer in spirit to early Christianity than to the French Revolution.” It’s hard to kick the habit of Jacobinism, what can I say.

    So I have to question, what to you is the “real” apocalypse? (quote: “to replace the real one”) Have you given up latent Christianity, but still found a “real” apocalypse? These days, I choose “The Myth of the Eternal Return” over “The End of History”.

    Oh, and so what do you think happened to the Anasazi?

    Seriously. Thanks for the comment.

  8. ” And then I would say that the Mongols were pastoralists, not hunter-gatherers. ”

    Fair enough Mongols did domesticate animals, but the Mongol ecology was based on hunting. Every year their would be the grand hunt in which every living thing was surrounded by a hunting party and killed for food.

    ” So you must admit that the is a ‘mythos’ of deforesting the Near East that must have some kind of meaning.”

    While currently the famed cedars of Lebanon are a thing of the Past I doubt Hiram and Solomon are responsible for their demise. Those Cedars are still mentioned in the days of Nebuchadnezzar which is 400 to 500 years after Solomon. Beyond the desertification of Iraq by the Mongols I really don’t know a lot about the other ecological disasters of the ancient and medieval near east and what or what not might have caused them.

    “but it does address that there is evidence for an ecological regime change in the regions that eventually birthed the monotheistic religions.”

    Having never read the book the premise seems suspect.

    “Well, I think you’re being too dualistic trying to turn the green-fundies on their head. I would say, places make cultures, foreign invasion destroys culture, and the result is ecological devastation. It doesn’t matter if the invaders are “civilized” or “savage.”

    I was being a bit polemical for the sake of argument so point taken.

    “So I have to question, what to you is the “real” apocalypse? (quote: “to replace the real one”) Have you given up latent Christianity, but still found a “real” apocalypse? ”

    No no. there is nothing latent in my Christianity as AC-DC said about their records no need to play them backwards the message is strait up, odd analogy I know their lucifarians and well I’m not. The Apocalypse of John was and is the prototype for all secular apocalypses, I’ll take John’s over Marx, Jensen and Greber’s apocalypse. Modern political thought especially leftist political thought is essentially a form of Christianity a heresy much like Arianism, Mormonism and JW’s etc. I find it off putting that most leftists are anti-Christian yet the structural edifice of their environmentalism, anarchism, communism etc is all Christian. Eden, Fall, Prophets and Paradise. The all encompassing nature of leftist analysis of power structures is their “sin”, just as sin is in all men so all men are potential exploiters.

    “Oh, and so what do you think happened to the Anasazi?”

    Great question, but I have not given it any thought at all.

    “Seriously. Thanks for the comment.”

    Thanks.

    My mistake the Hanging Gardens were built by Nebuchadnezzar not Hammurabi.

    Casey is your avatar name your Irish name?

    While I have strong issues with the environmental movement, I did think your one of the more balanced adherents.

    I watched your Cascadia documentary and as I said listened to your interview with Keith. I have some questions to about your Deep Green position. Is there any way we could talk?

  9. I think it was Norman Cohn in “Cosmos, Chaos, & the World to Come: the Ancient Roots of Apocalyptic Faith” who made the connection between monotheistic eschatology and Marxian determinism. (actually, I have the book in my hand but can’t find the reference, so it may actually be in his “The Pursuit of the Millennium”) Anyway: ‘Eden. Fall. Prophets. Paradise.’ You got it. It’s a massive topic, and I do see “environmentalism” falling into this same mold. I think it’s all highly problematic.

    I’ll state publicly that I have disagreements with “Deep Green” ideology, and while I want to revive ecological cultures, I am not an environmentalist. I wholeheartedly reject the culture/nature divide (idealistically). Call me a European Indigenist if you’d like….

    And yes, my avatar is my real name. This interview was posted using the anglicization of my real name.

    And I’ll take “Lord of the Rings” over “The Apocalypse of John” 😉

    my contact info is here:
    http://www.autonomycascadia.org/contact.html

  10. “And I’ll take “Lord of the Rings” over “The Apocalypse of John””

    Your comparing apples to oranges. The Silmarillion is the OT, the LOTR the NT and the Dagor Dagorath the Apocalypse.

    Thanks for the info.

  11. Casey I’ve tried your email I this response:


    Delivery to the following recipient failed permanently:

    autonomycascadia@risup.net

    Technical details of permanent failure:
    DNS Error: Address resolution of risup.net. failed: Domain name not found

    Maybe I should give you my contact info?

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