Electoralism/Democratism

Just How Rigged is the “Rigged Game”?

By Matt Taibbi

“The Division of Light and Power,” the new book by Dennis Kucinich, is an epic chronicle of American corruption.

Dennis Kucinich has always been ahead of his time. It’s both his distinction and his curse. As a presidential candidate in the 2000s he was ridiculed for backing tuition-free college, single-payer health care, ending the Iraq war, withdrawal from NAFTA and the WTO, same-sex marriage, legalized weed, slashed defense budgets, and a long list of other policies later deemed uncontroversial. When that Kucinich said he would happily nominate a gay or transgender person to the Supreme Court, Jon Stewart guffawed: “Yes, yes, all rise for the honorable chick with dick!”

By 2020 most all of Kucinich’s positions were orthodoxy among Democratic voters, yet he remains an outcast to Democrats nationally. In fact, he’s been frozen out of blue-state media for the better part of a decade, and welcomed during the same time to a five-year stint as a Fox News contributor. What gives? If even the Washington Post concedes that their former object of ridicule turned out to be “the future of American politics” — the politics of their own readers — why does the national political establishment continue to keep him out of sight?

The answers can be found in The Division of Light and Power, Kucinich’s enormous new memoir about his time as the Mayor of Cleveland, and his battle against Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, or CEI. The book is a surprising tour de force on multiple levels. First, it should immediately take a place among the celebrated ruthless accounts of how American politics really work, recalling jarring insider confessionals like Daniel Ellsberg’s Secrets or Robert Caro’s illusion-crushing portrait of municipal politics, The Power Broker. Second, it’s very skillfully written. Kucinich, always a voracious reader, turns out to be a born writer, with a gift for pace and detail.

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