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A Revolution in Song

An interesting analogy for what we are trying to do in the alternative anarchist movement:

Once upon a time, rock music was simply called “rock.” There were different genres to be sure, but they all fit under the “rock” umbrella. During the decade between the late 70s and late 80s, the phenomenon of “alternative” rock developed as a musical and cultural movement (which I was never into, btw). In the early 90s, “alternative rock” displaced what then came to be called “classic rock,” and what was once “alternative” is now simply ordinary rock music.

Today, we have the leftist-dominated anarchist movement, and “anarchism” is identified with this radical leftist ideology. Meanwhile, some of us are developing an “alternative anarchist” movement. Our tendencies continue to grow and more and more people from different backgrounds continue to come into our midst. Most of the National-Anarchists were always in our camp, of course, and more and more anarcho-capitalists or right-wing anarchists are moving in our direction. In more recent times, I’ve noticed more and more interest in our ideas from the left. For instance, proponents of anarcho-syndicalism, anarcho-communism, queer anarchism, individualist-feminism, Native American anarchism, Green anarchists, a minority of left-libertarians are others not typically thought of as right-wing have all expressed in positive interest in our activities in recent months. There are signs there may even be some openings from the world of black anarchism. Of course, our enemies keep shouting, but ultimately we’re going to win. Eventually, alternative anarchism will simply become “anarchism” and the anarcho-leftoids will be recognized for the dinosaurs they are. They are in many ways comparable to a classic rock band with only one or two original members, washed-up has-beens who are obviously only still in it for the money. We will eventually eclipse them.

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  1. Solidarity from a Black Anarchist/Mutualist/Left Libertarian. Even Ashanti Alston has admitted that he was annoyed by the arrogance of the Anarchist left that frowns upon black nationalism. At the time when he had conducted research on Anarchist relations with the black power movement, he was surprised to have only come across market Anarchists like Rothbard and Karl Hess.

    Also keep in mind that outside of petty labels, there are plenty of black Americans that are involved in projects that many market Anarchists or left libertarians would see that match their ideology. Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Black Oaks Center for Sustainable Renewable Living, African People’s Education and Defense Fund, Federation of Southern Cooperatives, All African People’s Development and Empowerment Project, as well as many others. While these groups may embrace some sort of collectivism, they are not opposed to monetary exchange and experience populist approval in their respective communities as opposed to what Karl Hess warned as “starry eyed whites.”

    While there are some things on this site I disagree with, I overall agree that this type of populist Anarchism is something I can align with rather than the culture imperialist Crimethinc crowd.

  2. Welcome, comrade! I look forward to seeing more contributions from you in the future.

    What was your take on the dust-up between Crimethinc and APOC?

  3. http://anarchistnews.org/?q=node/8794

    “CrimethInc has been/is the breeding ground for white anarchists. They
    encourage the culture of dropping out of society, which makes the assumption
    that the reader/attendee has that privilege and therefore their words speak
    only to those that have it.”

    Bam! Couldn’t have said it better.

    Mixed feelings about the situation cause I don’t know exactly went on. But that sums up my opinion on not only Crimethinc, but the ridiculously elitist Anarchist movement that’s nothing but an ideological extension for liberals who are trying to save the world but I have no idea how to save their own streets.

    It seems to me that the members of APOC had a legitimate concern. However, it’s still possible that they may have overreacted. I mean c’mon, they’re just idealist white kids. If they don’t want to get involved in neighborhood issues and want to stick to Chomsky fetishes, then fine, let them. I know for a fact that Pittsburgh’s black community could use organizing. The Nation of Islam down there I heard is ran by some rapper obsessed with his career and the NAACP/Urban League is full of the bourgeoisie. I personally think the black Anarchist movement should just cut ourselves off from these stupid movements that are obsessed over identity politics. Just focus primarily on cooperative manufacturing, urban agriculture, and other means of community-based entrepreneurship. Politically, we should stick to tenant rights, action against the war on drugs and the prison-industrial complex. This is the best possible way to get populist support from the black American community. The biggest mistake is underestimating Nationalists, cause they KNOW the starry eyed white bullshit these Crimethinkers don’t have a clue about.

    I probably wouldn’t have partaken in it. Pittsburgh pigs would have no problem taking my ass to jail for trying to steal from what’s probably a white college student. I’m not saying we should fear the state, but I just didn’t think this was worth it. Squatting and other means of land occupation? Hell yeah.

    I will admit to one thing. Immediately when I saw a “APOC Vs. Crimethinc” headline somewhere I said HELL YEAH GO APOC. Sue me.

  4. The article you linked to summarized the situation pretty well. I don’t know anyone who was there, so I don’t know what all the facts are either.

    “But that sums up my opinion on not only Crimethinc, but the ridiculously elitist Anarchist movement that’s nothing but an ideological extension for liberals who are trying to save the world but I have no idea how to save their own streets.”

    Yes! I agree 100%

    “The Nation of Islam down there I heard is ran by some rapper obsessed with his career and the NAACP/Urban League is full of the bourgeoisie.”

    Richmond is a lot like that as well. At one point the NOI, had a member on city council. He was a disbarred attorney who ended up in federal prison on fraud charges. It seems like most of the NAACP, Urban League, and other comparable groups are very middle to upper middle class oriented. Locally, most of these groups have always seemed to be dominated by lawyers, professionals, clergy, businessmen, etc.

    “Just focus primarily on cooperative manufacturing, urban agriculture, and other means of community-based entrepreneurship. Politically, we should stick to tenant rights, action against the war on drugs and the prison-industrial complex. This is the best possible way to get populist support from the black American community. ”

    Those are the issues I’m most interested in as well, particularly when it comes to local politics. Opposing corporate plutocracy, U.S. imperialism, and the U.S.-Israel relationship are my big interests on the national/global level.

  5. While some local NAACPs are still legitimate, (Cincinnati, for one) the Urban League is in much worse approval than the NAACP. I can’t remember the last black person I met who had anything good to say about them. If they had any association with their existence, it was simply for a job which is totally understandable. The Urban League in Cincinnati has a board of directors full of the same members of the same cronies who are trying to gentrify the downtown area to benefit the corporate state.

    I sincerely believe that the rise of the black Cooperative movement (DBCFSN, etc.) will phase them out or force them to seriously reconsider their corporate apologist agendas.

    In Detroit, we’ve already become a threat. Wall street crony John Hantz had commented on the grassroots community farming movements and stated “Someone has to pay taxes.” Yeah, some free market where a “businessman” is complaining about people not paying taxes. .

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