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Understanding Who The Real Enemy Is

“I am a child of the South. [Head of DHS] Janet Napolitano tells me I need to be afraid of people who are labeled white supremacists, but I was raised around white supremacists. I am not afraid of white supremacists. I am concerned about my own government. The Patriot Act did not come from white supremacists, it came from the White House and Congress. The Citizens United decision [granting corporations full political personhood] did not come from white supremacists; it came from the Supreme Court. I am willing to reach across traditional barriers that have been skillfully constructed by people who benefit from the way the system is organized.”

-Former congresswoman and Green Party presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney

Left-anarchists and left-libertarians, take lessons!

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  1. Interesting tides are brewing over the Atlantic. There’s still a lot of work to be done, though. Lately, I have been working on a friend of mine who sincerely believes that his simplistic PC ideology is not shared by the cultural and political elite. Like they’ve been cryogenically frozen since 1958. Sheesh…

  2. “Lately, I have been working on a friend of mine who sincerely believes that his simplistic PC ideology is not shared by the cultural and political elite. Like they’ve been cryogenically frozen since 1958.”

    You should show him/her these:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1249797/Labour-threw-open-doors-mass-migration-secret-plot-make-multicultural-UK.html

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-486452/New-law-means-anti-gay-comments-lead-seven-years-jail.html

    http://www.jihadwatch.org/2005/06/australia-pastor-prefers-jail-over-apology.html

  3. I think the main reason a lot of otherwise astute people are unable to grasp these issues is their own simple distaste for cultural conservatism and sympathy for the stated ideals of cultural leftism.

    For instance, Chomsky is a good a critic of the empire as they come, and while I think some of his economics are blinkered, he comes closer than most leftists to recognizing the interdependent relationship between capitalism and the state. But he recently compared present day America to the Weimar Republic and said blacks and immigrants are going to be attacked the same way Jews were attacked by the Nazis. Yeah, right. There are similarities between the U.S. and the Weimar Republic like political polarization, loss of political confidence, inflation and unemployment, military failure, etc., but the existence of a mass racist movement is not one of the similarities.

    Carson is better than Chomsky not only on economics, but on other domestic issues as well. He seems to understand the role of the New Class in modern systems and is a much more consistent libertarian than Chomsky. For instance, he attacks gun laws and public schools. But even Carson seems to not really get it on the Cultural Marxism question, and has the same “yikes! racist cooties!” reaction to the N-As as the Infoshoppers.

    Fortunately, we have Thomas Szasz and Paul Gottfried as critics of the therapeutic state and Cultural Marxism. I actually think Szasz is the better of the two in many ways, as Gottfried’s critique is largely limited to the conflict between the therapeutic-managerial-multicultural state and his own preferred old-style middle class-oriented, WASPish, bourgeoisie conservatism. Szasz gets into more radical territory with his critique of the War on Drugs as the modern version of religious persecution and his attacks on the psychiatric establishment, and its role in the persecution of marginal subcultures, the underclass, etc. Szasz is also far more consistently anti-statist.

  4. He actually supports that kind of shit; it is ‘progress’, after all. I don’t really mind if I persuade him or not (I suspect I won’t); I’m treating it as a testing ground for various rhetorical tactics more than anything else. He genuinely believes that my Nietzsche/Schopenhauer/Stoic-influenced attitude towards the acceptance of the inevitability of suffering is simply a by-product of my ‘straight white male privilege’, so we’re not exactly dealing with a particularly rigorous thinker here.

    It’s truly depressing how many otherwise intelligent, reasonable people have a chancre-sore of totalitarian-humanism in their minds, which sucks in logic and critical analysis like a black hole sucks in light. If I couldn’t kick back amongst cerebral company here, I think I’d probably go on a killing spree or something. LOL.

  5. “I think the main reason a lot of otherwise astute people are unable to grasp these issues is their own simple distaste for cultural conservatism and sympathy for the stated ideals of cultural leftism.”

    Exactly. I think a certain degree of class-based elitism is also often apparent; PC allows middle-class liberals to engage in snobbery about the Great Unwashed under the guise of a pious defence of the Holy Oppressed Ones. Consistent with its ideological origins in a revisionist Marxism which turned against the traditional working-class after they failed to instigate the World Revolution, I guess.

    “Fortunately, we have Thomas Szasz and Paul Gottfried as critics of the therapeutic state and Cultural Marxism. I actually think Szasz is the better of the two in many ways, as Gottfried’s critique is largely limited to the conflict between the therapeutic-managerial-multicultural state and his own preferred old-style middle class-oriented, WASPish, bourgeoisie conservatism. Szasz gets into more radical territory with his critique of the War on Drugs as the modern version of religious persecution and his attacks on the psychiatric establishment, and its role in the persecution of marginal subcultures, the underclass, etc. Szasz is also far more consistently anti-statist.”

    I’ve not yet come across much by Szasz, I must admit. What articles would be good starting points for exploring his work?

  6. I’d recommend books by Szasz, not articles. He’s been as prolific as Chomsky throughout his career. His classic is “The Myth of Mental Illness,” published in 1961.

    Other favorites of mine are “The Manufacture of Madness,” “Ceremonial Chemistry,” “Sex by Prescription,” and “Our Right to Drugs.” Of course, these just scratch the surface.

  7. Btw, I fully expect this issue of “totalitarian humanism” to be the primary dividing line in Western politics in the decades ahead, rather than, say, race, religion, or class. It is the ideological superstructure of the present ruling class, just as the Leninist rendition of Marxism was the ideological superstructure of the Soviet Union. Matters of race, religion, and class enter into it, of course, but they are not the definitive issues.

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