Sunic interviews De Benoist: Part 2 15

Here it is.

In Part 2, Tom and Alain discuss Third World immigration into European countries, Islam’s current expansion, Alain’s critique of Capitalism and the “Americanization” of the world. The show includes:

  • Forced multiculturalism as the primary element of discord in European countries.
  • Capitalism as a bourgeois value system that prioritizes the accumulation of money above all else.
  • Alain’s thoughts on the future of America and Europe.
  • America’s Puritanical foundation and its quest for ethnic, social, economic and cultural Universalization

About Alain de Benoist

Alain de Benoist.jpg

Alain de Benoist was born on 11 December 1943. He is married and has two children. He has studied law, philosophy, sociology, and the history of religions in Paris, France. A journalist and a writer, he is the editor of two journals: Nouvelle Ecole (since 1968) and Krisis (since 1988). His main fields of interest include the history of ideas, political philosophy, classical philosophy, and archaeology. He has published more than fifty books and three thousand articles. He is also a regular contributor to many French and European publications, journals, and papers (including Valeurs Actuelles, Le Spectacle du Monde, Magazine-Hebdo, Le Figaro-Magazine, in France, Telos in the United States, and Junge Freiheit in Germany). In 1978 he received the Grand Prix de l’Essai from the Academie Francaise for his book Vu de droite: Anthologie critique des idees contemporaines (Copernic, 1977). He has also been a regular contributor to the radio program France-Culture and has appeared in numerous television debates.

To learn more about Alain de Benoist, read his insightful articles at his personal website and at The Alain De Benoist Collection.

15 comments

  1. I pointed out that he does not speak in a french accent, and you replied that his erudition was amazing. To me, that sounds like that’s what you were implying, which i thought was actually a little funny, as I’ve always found french accents to be odd and impenetrable. That’s okay.

  2. Agreed. The low level of grammar and punctuation, as well as the simplistic phrasing and sentence structures, in this country is maddening. I blame the rise of online chatting and cell phone texting, which encourages people to write, and, by extension, think in simple, convenient abbreviations. I think it’s all part of the ruling elite’s systematic dumbing down of the population.

  3. I never really heard anyone speak proper English until I went to Europe.

    I think American society unfortunately has a strong cultural strand of anti-intellectualism. To some degree, speaking and writing in an intelligent manner or thinking about things of substance is considered uncool, nerdy, or whatever the appropriate perjorative would be. For instance, among lower-class blacks those who value learning and intelligence are accused of “acting white” at times. I think what goes on there is a more extreme version of the anti-intellectualism found in the wider culture.

    For instance, in French culture, leading intellectuals like Sartre, Camus, De Beavoir, Foucault, etc. were actually considered to be celebrities. Whatever one thinks of their actual ideas, the notion of “celebrity intellectuals” in America is almost unthinkable. I can think of almost no one from recent history who would fall into that category. Maybe some of the celebrity scientists like Carl Sagan come close.

  4. I’ve noticed and lamented the same. For a particularly sad example of this, compare the media coverage and public reaction to the death of Michael Jackson to that of Howard Zinn. Pathetic.

  5. I used to watch Family Matters almost religously. That, and Home Improvement. Ah, the damn nineties…Of course, with Britney on the comeback and half the Clinton Administration back in office we might be caught in a partial time warp back to that decade!

  6. “with Britney on the comeback and half the Clinton Administration back in office we might be caught in a partial time warp back to that decade!”

    The electorate of this decade have the lionization of charismatic leaders down to a tee! Do Obama worship and Clinton worship really differ that much?

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