How Trump’s Republican Party Went Soft on Communism Reply

This columnist is apparently 30 years behind the times. While this article is intended as a bromide against Trump’s foreign policy, it actually makes him sound a lot better than he actually is. While Trump’s lack of Russophobia, only mild Sinophobia, and willingness to engage in diplomacy with the DPRK is a a good thing,Trump has been more pro-Israel than any US President to date, escalated hostilities with Iran, backed away from Obama’s efforts to normalize relations with Cuba, and provided billions in arms to the Saudis while they are waging genocide in Yemen and in the Eastern Province.

By Stephen Chapman

Reason

If you had told Ronald Reagan in 1988 that in 30 years, the president of the United States would be chummy with communist dictators in China and North Korea, eager to please a brutal Kremlin autocrat, and indifferent to the needs of our military allies, he might have said: That’s what you get for electing a Democrat.

Today’s Republicans make up a party he wouldn’t recognize. For decades, the Russians and Chinese dispatched spies and enlisted American sympathizers to try to harm the United States and tilt its policies in their favor. Under Donald Trump, they don’t have to. They have a friend in the Oval Office.

It’s the most astonishing reversal in modern American political history. Over the past century, the right accused liberals and Democrats of excusing the crimes of Josef Stalin, Mao Zedong, and Fidel Castro. Often, the criticism was well-founded.

Harvard’s John King Fairbank, the dean of American China scholars, spoke for many on the left in 1972 when he said the communist revolution was “the best thing that has happened to the Chinese people in centuries.” President Jimmy Carter, who spurned Americans’ “inordinate fear of communism,” was shocked by the invasion of Afghanistan. Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, he lamented, “lied to me.”

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Keith Preston: Trump’s willingness to abide by peace agreement with North Korea unclear Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

The government of North Korea is determined to establishing peaceful relations with the United States and denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula, but President Donald Trump’s willingness to abide by any agreement is unclear, says an American political analyst in Virginia.

“The regime of [North Korean leader] Kim Jong-un is serious about wanting to make some sort of international peace with the United States for a variety of reasons,” said Keith Preston, chief editor of AttacktheSystem.com.

“The evidence is that they are indeed sincere about wanting to pursue some sort of agreement with the United States; the question how much the United States going to be willing to give,” Preston told Press TV on Thursday.

Trump said Tuesday Washington was stopping “very provocative” and “very expensive” military exercises with South Korea to facilitate denuclearization negotiations with North Korea.

The United States and South Korea hold regular military drills to the fury of North Korea, which has long seen the drills as preparations to invade it.

“The war games are very expensive, we pay for the majority of them,” Trump told a news conference on in Singapore after a historic summit with Kim.

Trump’s announcement was a surprise even to the government of South Korean President Moon Jae-in, which worked in recent months to help bring about the Trump-Kim summit.

“We will be stopping the war games which will save us a tremendous amount of money, unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should. But we’ll be saving a tremendous amount of money, plus I think it’s very provocative,” Trump said.

Pentagon officials were not immediately able to provide any details about Trump’s remarks about suspending military drills, a step the US military has long resisted.

Trump and Kim promised in a joint statement to work toward the “denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula, and the United States promised its Cold War foe security guarantees.

Trump and Kim arrived in Singapore on Sunday to hold the first ever face-to-face meeting between leaders of the two countries, which have remained enemies since the 1950-1953 Korean War.

While the summit is seen as a test for diplomacy that could end the long-running nuclear standoff, foreign policy experts say the stakes are high if it does not result in a nuclear agreement.

Henry Kissinger has ‘advised Donald Trump to accept’ Crimea as part of Russia Reply

Kissinger represents a ruling class faction that wants to extend the olive branch to Russia in order to create conflict within the BRIICS axis. Tillerson was also associated with that faction, and that’s why Tillerson was initially chosen as Sec of State. When Tillerson was forced out it was a sign that the Deep State faction was gaining the upper hand in the Trump administration. The Deep State is more concerned with protecting the cash flow and power base of the military-industrial-intelligence apparatus, so they always need an official enemy to be at war with. Reviving the Cold War with Russia is a good means to that end. Kissinger represents the uber-globalist faction of the elite that ‘s more about consolidating the empire on the international level by subsuming unruly provinces and bringing them into the fold, or dividing and conquering them when that doesn’t work. See here.

By Andrew Buncombe

The Independent

Is the veteran US diplomat Henry Kissinger working to secure a rapprochement between the US and Moscow by pushing for an end to sanctions in exchange for the removal of Russian troops from eastern Ukraine?

A flurry of reports suggest the 93-year-old diplomat is positioning himself as a intermediary between Vladimir Putin and President-elect Donald Trump. He has publicly praised Mr Trump, and traveled to Trump Tower in New York to offer his counsel built on decades of lobbying and diplomacy.

A report in the German tabloid Der Bild headlined ‘Kissinger to prevent new Cold War’, claimed the former envoy was working towards a new relationship with Russia.

This would involve the US accepting that Crimea, a Ukrainian territory that Russia seized in March 2014, now belongs to Moscow. In exchange, Russia would remove troops and military supplies to rebels in eastern Ukraine which have fighting a war against the Ukrainian government.

The report did not provide details, but claimed that “sources” said that Mr Kissinger was drawing up a “master plan” for Ukraine.

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The Real Revolution Has Nothing To Do With Donald Trump 1

Like all presidents, Trump is just an administrative manager for the power elite (much to his own frustration, I would imagine).

By Caitlin Johnstone

Medium

It’s been a weird last couple of days. I wrote an article about WikiLeaks’ dismissal of “QAnon”, the anonymous 8chan poster that hundreds of thousands of conspiracy newbies believe is sharing secret, coded information about Donald Trump’s heroic war against the US deep state.

Ever since I hit publish I’ve been getting a bunch of angry Q enthusiasts in my social media notifications accusing me of being a shill for the establishment. Because I don’t believe someone who says that we should all trust the President of the United States. Blind faith in the executive branch of the US government is anti-establishment now.

As bizarre as these interactions have been, they are still vastly more pleasant than my typical interactions with the faction I see as QAnon’s mirror image, the Russiagaters. Though enthusiasts of the Russiagate conspiracy theory are far more nasty and vituperative than the Q crowd, there are many similarities. Like QAnon, Russiagate is fueled by about ten percent information and ninety percent desperate need to believe. Like QAnon, Russiagate is so thinly substantiated it doesn’t begin to look legitimate until you’ve spent weeks crawling down the rabbit holes of its bulletproof echo chambers and squinting just right at everything you see until it feels true. Like QAnon, the evangelists of Russiagate center their revolutionary sentiment around President Donald Trump. Like QAnon, they shouldn’t.

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Keith Preston: Trump does not deserve the Nobel Peace Prize 1

Press TV. Listen here.

US President Donald Trump does not deserve the Nobel Peace Prize because his foreign policy is creating tensions in the Middle East, an American journalist says.

According to a new poll a majority of Americans believe Trump does not deserve receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Just 24 percent of registered voters said that Trump deserves the award, compared to 61 percent who said he does not, a Politico/Morning Consult poll released Wednesday found.

“Trump has been in office for almost a year and a half; already during the time he has been in office he has launched two major attacks on Syria – about a year apart – under dubious circumstances. He’s also made an enormous arms deal with Saudi Arabia even if Saudi Arabia continues to engage in genocide in Yemen and Saudi Arabia’s own eastern province,” said Keith Preston, chief editor and director of AttacktheSystem.com.

“Donald Trump has also been more supportive of Israel than probably just about any president of the United Sates has been.”

Preston said US support of the aggressions of Israel and the actions of Saudi Arabia, and also Trump’s termination of the nuclear agreement with Iran has nothing to do with promoting global peace and stability.

“The idea that the Trump administration is somehow advancing world peace is nonsense.”

Preston cautioned about overvaluing the Nobel Prize arguing that in the 70s “Henry Kissinger was given the Nobel Peace Prize even as the United Sates was waging a genocidal war in Southeast Asia.”

“[Former President] Barack Obama was given a Nobel Peace Prize only a few months after assuming office when he really had done nothing that merited any kind of recognition of that type.”

Romney praises Trump’s first year in office: It’s similar to things ‘I’d have done’ 1

Another former Never Trumper admits Trump turned out to be just another moderate Republican/neocon stooge, as all presidents ultimately do if they want to remain alive, out of jail, and employable when they leave office.

By John Bowden

MSN.Com

Mitt Romney wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building

Former GOP presidential nominee and current Senate candidate Mitt Romney praised President Trump’s first year in office on Tuesday, saying it was similar to what the first year of a Romney administration would look like.

In response to a question from a voter in Utah, Romney seemed to indicate that he largely approved of the policies pursued by the Trump administration during Trump’s first year in the White House, calling it “better than expected,” the Washington Examiner reports.

“His first year is very similar to things I’d have done my first year,” Romney said. “The things he’s actually done have been better than I expected.”

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The Coup is Complete – Trump is Done 1

This assessment seems fairly on target.

By Tom Luongo

If there is one thing the last 48 hours have proved to me, it’s this.  Donald Trump is no longer acting President.  The coup against Trump has been completed.

I’m going to keep this simple.  Follow the dots and try to keep up.

  1. The Deep State’s lies are being unraveled in real time thanks to the collective intelligence of the ‘internet’ and our ability to synthesize data in real time.
  2. The Skripal poisoning and the latest Syrian “chemical weapons” attack share the same thing — both set government officials off rushing to judgment and action before any official investigation could debunk them.

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Donald Trump: Business as Usual But… Reply

My assessment of the Trump presidency thus far.

By Keith Preston

Trump Kissinger

When Donald Trump’s seemingly maverick presidential campaign began to accelerate in 2016, both the Left and Right in domestic U.S. politics began to formulate predictable reactions almost on cue. Virtually the entire spectrum of the American right-wing, save the seeming spoil sports of the (neo-Trotskyist) neoconservative milieu, began heralding “The Donald” as the savior of (pick one) the American nation, the white race, the free market, the working class, the Christian faith, traditional values, or something or other. Such was the attitude of virtually the entire configuration of the Alt-Right/Lite, ordinary FOX News watching Republican voters, white nationalists, the religious right, and not a few libertarians. Of course, the Left reacted with a parallel reflex, insisting that Trump was the second coming of Hitler, or at least Mussolini or at the bare minimum Franco. In the weeks leading up to the election I was constantly getting messages from right-wing friends saying things like “Hope you’re on the Trump train!” and from left-wing friends saying “Hope you’re voting against the fascist!” Of course, being the contrarian that I am, I declined to get aboard any trains, and I voted for the same candidate I always vote for, i.e. the illustrious Nobody.

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Image result for trump nixon reagan

Keith Preston: US failed to remove independent Syrian government Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

The new shift in US policy in Syria was influenced by President Donald Trump’s so-called America First policy that he has advocated since coming to office, says a political analyst.

Following Trump’s election, “America First” has become the official foreign policy doctrine of his administration, which emphasizes American nationalism and anti-interventionism.

On Thursday, Trump announced that the US will withdraw from Syria “very soon.”

One day later, Trump ordered the US State Department to freeze over $200 million in funds for recovery efforts in Syria.

Trump’s pullback from Syria  signals a new strategy amid a reassessment of the role the US should play in the conflict, said Keith Preston, chief editor of AttacktheSystem.com..

The Trump administration has realized that the US-led military campaign in Syria has failed to reach its objective of removing the independent government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Preston told Press TV on Friday.

The US has reportedly more than 2,000 troops stationed in eastern Syria, in addition to several thousand others in the Arab country’s north.

Trump has complained that the US has wasted trillions of dollars in Middle East wars, but gets “nothing” in return.

 

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The Trump Administration’s Death Penalty Daydream Reply

I suspect Trump and Sessions’ latest efforts to throw a bone to their redneck “base” will likely fail, and potentially backfire given that the general trend is toward liberalization of both drug and criminal  justice police.

By Matt Ford

The New Republic

In a speech Monday in Manchester, New Hampshire, President Donald Trump enthusiastically backed capital punishment as a tool to fight the opioid epidemic. “If we don’t get tough on the drug dealers, we are wasting our time,” he said. “And that toughness includes the death penalty.” Now, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is trying to put Trump’s call into practice.

In one-page memo dated Tuesday, Sessions instructed U.S. attorneys nationwide to be more aggressive when prosecuting any drug-related crimes. In addition to the usual tools available to federal prosecutors, he urged them to consider “the pursuit of capital punishment in appropriate cases.” To that end, he noted a few specific federal offenses where Congress already authorized the death penalty as a punishment.

“I strongly encourage federal prosecutors to use these statutes, when appropriate, to aid in our continuing fight against drug trafficking and the destruction it causes,” Sessions wrote.

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A President Everyone Can Hate? 5

In many ways, Trump is turning out like I hoped he would. It’s good to have a guy who acts like a total asshole as head of state, because it’s more in keeping with the character of the state. Trump acts and sounds like a New York mafia boss, and this is certainly appropriate given the gangster character of the state as an institution.

It was predictable enough that a perceived racist and sexist would certainly draw the hatred of the Left, but the fact that he’s essentially a New York liberal at heart who doesn’t give a fuck about guns will alienate the populist right, his lack of “morals” in his personal life has got to at least make the religious right uncomfortable, his support for tariffs is likely to alienate Chamber of Commerce Republicans, his perceived pro-Russian stance is offensive to the neocons, and his authoritarianism is alienating to libertarians and libertarian-leaning conservatives as well. It’s great to have a head of state everyone can potentially hate.

Now, when are the supposed “anarchists” going to step up to the plate and start organizing real opposition to the state?

Image result for trump gangster

 

Scott Adams and Dave Rubin: Trump’s Persuasion and Presidency 2

This is a pretty good discussion of Trump’s performance thus far. Now that it’s apparent that Trump will more or less govern as a normal, moderate Republican, it appears the neocons have lessened their hostility to him, as the recent headlines and articles at Neocon Review attests.

Scott Adams (creator of Dilbert) joins Dave to discuss his newest book “Win Bigly” about how Donald Trump used the power of persuasion to win the election, Trumps negotiating strategies and tactics, the trend of ‘Trump Derangement Syndrome,’ the crumbling mainstream media, the Trump/Russia controversy, his predictions for future candidates and the future of Trump, and more.

President Trump’s 2017 Report Card (first draft) 2

When Trump was running for President, I predicted that he would govern about like a moderate Republican in the Nixon-Rockefeller tradition, or as a centrist Democrat in the style of Bill Clinton. Apparently, I was right. It’s rather embarrassing that so many in the various “anarchist” camps have bought into the anti-Trump hysteria. Trumpism is an enemy, but only a peripheral one. The real enemy is the establishment center. Serious anarchists should be just as opposed to neoliberal and progressive Democrats as they are to conservative or populist Republicans.

By Scott Adams

As we approach the holiday season there will be much debate on how President Trump has performed for his first calendar year. As a populist president, I think the best way to judge his performance is by focusing on the issues voters say are their top priorities. Pew Research polled voters to determine their political priorities for 2017. Let’s see how President Trump is doing so far on the top ten priorities according to the public.

Terrorism (76% rated top priority)

ISIS is on the run, thanks in part to President Trump’s loosening of the rules of military engagement, as well as pivoting from a Whack-a-Mole strategy to a total annihilation strategy with no withdrawal date. Both moves are good persuasion. And while President Trump’s “extreme vetting” is unpopular with many citizens, it has probably reduced risk to the homeland. And General Mattis is widely considered to be a strong hire.

     Grade: A

Economy (73% rated top priority)

I’ll give President Obama 75% credit for the strong economy. But I think consumer confidence and the stock market tell us there is optimism about the current administration. That confidence is buoyed by Trump’s reduction in regulations via executive orders, his tough talk on trade, and his persuasion toward a higher GDP that is already becoming self-fulfilling. If people believe the economy will be better next year than this year, they invest this year, thus making next year better. We might see something good come out of tax reform, but I don’t think it will matter as much as people assume.

     Grade: A

 

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Keith Preston: Trump Most “Pro-Zionist” U.S. President Ever Reply

I got a mention in Breitbart, lol. Listen to the original interview with Press TV here.

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 20: President Donald Trump delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. In today's inauguration ceremony Donald J. Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel renders him the “most pro-Zionist” commander-in-chief to have ever held the high office, declared Iran’s state-controlled news agency Press TV, citing an analyst.

State sponsor of terrorism Iran does not recognize Israel’s right to exist and has continually threatened to destroy it. The Shiite powerhouse joined various predominantly Muslim countries, jihadist groups like al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL), and Pope Francis in condemning President Trump’s decision.

On Wednesday, Trump announced that the U.S. will recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and has directed his administration to move America’s diplomatic mission from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

“I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,” declared Trump. “While previous presidents have made this a major campaign promise, they failed to deliver. Today, I am delivering.”

Soon after Trump made his historic decision public, Keith Preston, director of attackthesystem.com, told Press TV:

This is not surprising that Trump would make this announcement. One thing that needs to be recognized about the Trump administration’s foreign policy is that the Trump administration is zealously pro-Israel.

The Trump administration is ardently pro-Zionist, even more, pro-Zionist than many past administrations have been, arguably the most pro-Zionist administration in U.S. history.

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Keith Preston: Trump has well-developed capacity for insulting people Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

US President Donald Trump’s use of the name “Pocahontas” during a White House ceremony honoring Native American World War II veterans highlights his inclination to insult and abuse people, according to an American analyst.

“Donald Trump has a very well-developed capacity for insulting people; it’s almost what he specializes in,” said Keith Preston, chief editor of AttacktheSystem.com.

Donald Trump is prone to making comments that are vey inflammatory from a racial and ethnic perspective,” Preston told Press TV on Tuesday.

“This reflects the wider divisions in our society,” he added. “We have a very polarized society.”

Trump made a remark on Monday some called racist at a White House event honoring Native American World War II veterans by referring to Senator Elizabeth Warren as “Pocahontas.”

“We have a representative in Congress who they say was here a long time ago,” Trump said. “They call her Pocahontas. But you know what, I like you.”

Warren, a noted legal scholar who taught at Harvard Law School, denounced Trump for stopping to a “disgusting low” by attacking her with a derisive nickname.

“President Trump couldn’t even make it through a ceremony to honor these men without throwing in a racial slur,” Warren told CNN.

Trump started accusing Warren of lying about her heritage and called her “Pocahontas” at a campaign rally in June, 2016, according to the Washington Post, when Warren was campaigning for Trump’s Democratic rival Hilary Clinton.

Warren has been accused of using her Native American Heritage to get ahead in her political career, particularly in the 2012 Massachusetts race for senator, according to the Boston Globe.

Genealogists have found a document stating that she has a great-great-great-grandmother who is Native American, which would make her 1/32 Cherokee, but they say it would take more research to confirm that finding.

President Trump’s Fateful Choice 1

The Trump administration is Republican business as usual, as virtually all serious observers predicted it would be. The great thing about the Trump presidency is not only is Trump generally unpopular outside of his dying right-wing of the WASP middle class “base,” but he is demonstrating that Presidents are simply CEOs of America, Inc., and the state-capitalist oligarchs who serve as the de facto Board of Directors.

By William S. Lind

Traditional Right

President Trump ran as a Republican, but he did not win as a Republican.  He won as a populist.  If he is to be a successful president and win re-election, he needs to make a fateful choice: will he govern as a populist or as a Republican?  If he chooses the latter, he will fail.

Unfortunately, the president seems to be leaning more and more towards governing as a Republican.  The tax reform proposal he recently offered is classic Republican:  it may benefit the middle class indirectly by creating more jobs, but its direct beneficiaries are high-income people.  One simple change would transform it into a populist measure: a high tax rate, say 75%, on earned incomes over $1,000,000 annually (indexed for inflation).  The people who elected Mr. Trump would cheer.

On the vexing problem of health insurance, the president’s latest action, cutting government subsidies to insurance companies to subsidize low income people, may hurt Trump voters.  Many of his supporters have modest incomes. They are not Republicans with money to burn.  The populist answer to health care is Medicare for all, with Medicare’s ability to control prices.  The origin of the health care affordability problem is grossly excessive prices for anything labelled “medical”. Any policy that does not deal with those prices is a band-aid.

In foreign and defense policy, Trump voters do not want more unnecessary wars halfway around the world that kill our kids and waste our money.  That is the populist position: America first.  If we are attacked, we fight, but why should young Americans die in the centuries-old war between Sunni and Shiite Islamics?  Here again, President Trump seems to be governing as a Republican, not a populist.  Continuing the futile war in Afghanistan, re-involving ourselves on the ground in Iraq, putting “advisors” in Syria, spooling up the long-standing and strategically meaningless war of words with North Korea—none of this is populist.  It all comes from the playbook of Republicans such as Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham, who cannot stand the thought that there is a quarrel somewhere in the world in which the U.S. is not involved.

I suspect President Trump knows the Republicans have taken over his administration and pushed the populism that elected him to the side.  Unfortunately, he seems not to know what to do about it.  There are sources of ideas and people from which he could assemble a different, populist-conservative agenda and set of advisors.  I write for one of them, The American Conservative magazine.

What the Republicans in and around the White House do not understand, in addition to the bankruptcy of the Republican “we serve the rich” agenda, is that populism is the wave of the future, both here and in Europe and on the Left as well as the Right.  Establishment Republicans and Democrats alike fear populism.  But to a president elected because he was seen as a populist, the populist wave of the future is one he should seek to ride.  If not President Trump then someone else will combine the Trump and Sanders voters into a new, enduring political majority that will shape America’s future agenda.  In the end, it is not President Trump or Senator Sanders who is important.  It is the people who voted for both.

 

Keith Preston: US-N Korea war ‘devastating,’ not likely to happen Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

US President Donald Trump’s threats of military action against North Korea are “overblown” statement that would never come true, an American analyst says, arguing American military officials are well-aware how “devastating” such warfare would be.

Keith Preston, director of attackthesystem.org, made the remarks while discussing Trump’s debut speech at the United Nations General Assembly, where he said Tuesday that the US was ready to destroy the North to resolve the ongoing standoff over the country’s ballistic missile and nuclear weapons program.

“Trump is known for his blustering and overblown rhetoric,” Preston told Press TV on Wednesday. “Anything that Trump says along the lines of threatening to destroy North Korea has to be taken with a grain of salt.”

“This is a long-standing conflict between the United States and North Korea and the norm is that the countries like to talk tough against one another… but nothing ever comes of this,” the analyst argued.

Last month, when the standoff between North Korea and the US over Pyongyang’s ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programs reached its peak, Trump threatened North Korean leader Kim Jong-un with “fire and fury the world has never seen.”

The threats, however, have not gone down well with traditional US allies like the UK, France and Germany who have all called for diplomatic solutions.

‘American people have other priorities’

Preston said American military action against North Korea under the Trump administration was “unlikely” because US military officials would oppose it and the Republican “tends to be very deferent to military opinion.”

“There is a wide range of areas in which Trump has shifted his own positions out of deference to the judgment of the military hierarchy and I don’t think that the American military establishment is fund of the idea” of a war with North Korea because it would be “devastating.”

Citing the “disastrous” US-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Preston said a direct military confrontation with Pyongyang would be “even more disastrous.”

Another reason that made the war unlikely, according to Preston, was the fact that the American public was preoccupied with more important problems like the economy, immigration and healthcare and didn’t pay much attention to tensions with North Korea.

 

The GOP isn’t the party of Reagan. It’s the party of Nixon. Reply

Anti-Trumpians need to get over the “Trump is a fascist” hysteria. Trump is a neo-Nixonian (which is bad enough) not a neo-Nazi.

By Daniel McCarthy

The Week

The Richard Nixon renaissance is upon us. And it’s a comeback every bit as remarkable as Nixon’s return from the political wilderness to win the White House in 1968.

Late last month, Bob Dole wrote an essay arguing that “Washington could use a man like Nixon again.” This week, Pat Buchanan publishes a second memoir of his time with the 37th president, Nixon’s White House Wars. But the real Nixon revival isn’t in print. It’s in the Oval Office.

President Trump is easily the most Nixonian figure to inhabit the White House since Nixon himself. And under Trump, the Republicans are again becoming Nixon’s party. Look around you: The long idealized party of Reagan, this is not.

To understand the Republican Party of the last half-century, it’s helpful to draw a distinction between what’s “conservative” and what’s “right-wing.” Nixon, like Trump, was right-wing but not conservative — that is, neither of them cared a whit for ideological purity as a matter of principle. Trump, like Nixon, is no believer in small-government dogma. Nixon’s opening to China scandalized the conservatives of his time much as Trump’s “America First” language shocked the keepers of conservatism’s foreign-policy orthodoxy last year.

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Keith Preston on Trump’s Attack on Syria Reply

Tasmin News Agency

پرتسون

TEHRAN (Tasnim) – An American political analyst said “pro-Israeli forces within the United States have for years exercised considerable pressure on the US to take action against Syria”, stressing that the recent attack on the Arab country seeks to serve the interests of Israel in the region.

“There is also evidence that the pro-Israeli forces within the United States have for years exercised considerable pressure on the United States to take action against Syria, and Trump has always had a very enthusiastically capitulating attitude towards the Israeli interests,” Keith Preston, the chief editor and director of attackthesystem.com, told the Tasnim news agency.

The following is the full text of the interview.

Tasnim: As you know,dozens of people were killed in a chemical attack in the Syrian town of Khan Shaykhun in the northwestern province of Idlib on Tuesday. The United States and its allies were quick to accuse Syrian government forces of carrying out the attack. The Syrian army said, however, that “it has never used them (chemical weapons), anytime, anywhere, and will not do so in the future.” Later, Washington warned that it will take unilateral action against the Arab country. On Friday morning, the US military, without UN mandate, launched about 60 Tomahawk missiles against several targets on al-Shayrat air base in Homs province in western Syria.Tonight, I ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in Syria from where the chemical attack was launched,” US President Donald Trump told reporters at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. What’s your take on this?

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Robert Stark talks to Rabbit about Trump’s Betrayal & Attack on Syria Reply

The Stark Truth. Listen here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Stark and co-host Pilleater talk to Rabbit about Trump’s attack on Syria and the betrayal of his base. Rabbit blogs at AltLeft.com – “The left wing of the AltRight”

Topics:

The gas “attack” in syria and how it’s being used as propaganda to draw us into war
Anatoly Karlin’s article This Fishy Smell of Sarin, or Was it Chlorine?
Regardless of what happened the conflict is none of our business
How the AltRight is totally united in not wanting to go to war in Syria and disillusioned with Trump
Richard Spencer: Will Trump Gas His Presidency Over Syria?
Hillary Clinton and the Neocon/Never-Trumpers praising Trump’s decision to invade Syria
The hubris in thinking we should decide who the the leaders should be in other countries, and how the US never learns it’s lessons
Trump’s use of liberal humanitarian rhetoric to justify intervention
The Trump admin being taken over by neocons and Trump himself making dumb statements
Steve Bannon’s removal from the National Security Council
How gullible US politicians and media are, and how easily manipulated emotionally people are by imagery
How the North Korea situation is none of our business either, and how it is a self created threat
Other examples of Trump betraying his base including Signing Measure to Let ISPs Sell Your Data Without ConsentHealthcare, and Free Trade