Culture Wars/Current Controversies

Critical Race Theory

A paleconservative critique, Traditional Right

Across the country, grass roots resistance to “critical race theory” is growing, and that is a good thing.  But what is critical race theory and where did it come from?

At its core, critical race theory is the argument that all white people have an unjustified negative attitude towards blacks and some (not all) other races, which leads whites to treat blacks et. al. unfairly.  No white is exempt from this bias, and if they are to avoid being “racists”, they must be psychologically conditioned to mouth a set of lies about what evil people they are, grovel in the dirt before blacks, pay “reparations”, etc.  For blacks, it’s a racket, what Tom Wolfe called “mau-mauing the flack catchers.”  For black “leaders”, it’s a highly remunerative shakedown: pay me off or I’ll call you a racist.  It should be ridden out of every town and campus in America on a rail, wearing tar and feathers.

The question of where critical race theory came from points to a larger threat.  In a column in the June 3 Wall Street Journal, Daniel Henninger wrote,

Critical race theory refers to an idea that emerged some 40 years ago in academia.  The idea’s originators, most famously the late Harvard Law professor Derrick Bell, argues that “race” infuses virtually every aspect of American social reality.

Henninger is not wrong, but this history is incomplete.  Critical Race theory is a subset of Critical Theory, which was invented in the 1930s and ‘40s by the Frankfurt School, the group of Marxist intellectuals who created cultural Marxism, now most commonly known as “wokeness”.  Critical Theory quickly became one of the most important tools in their quest to destroy traditional society, Western culture, and the Christian religion.  The term “Critical Theory” is something of a play on words: the theory is to criticize, to damage and eventually destroy all traditional institutions by unremitting criticism.

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