Keith Preston: US-N Korea war ‘devastating,’ not likely to happen Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

US President Donald Trump’s threats of military action against North Korea are “overblown” statement that would never come true, an American analyst says, arguing American military officials are well-aware how “devastating” such warfare would be.

Keith Preston, director of attackthesystem.org, made the remarks while discussing Trump’s debut speech at the United Nations General Assembly, where he said Tuesday that the US was ready to destroy the North to resolve the ongoing standoff over the country’s ballistic missile and nuclear weapons program.

“Trump is known for his blustering and overblown rhetoric,” Preston told Press TV on Wednesday. “Anything that Trump says along the lines of threatening to destroy North Korea has to be taken with a grain of salt.”

“This is a long-standing conflict between the United States and North Korea and the norm is that the countries like to talk tough against one another… but nothing ever comes of this,” the analyst argued.

Last month, when the standoff between North Korea and the US over Pyongyang’s ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programs reached its peak, Trump threatened North Korean leader Kim Jong-un with “fire and fury the world has never seen.”

The threats, however, have not gone down well with traditional US allies like the UK, France and Germany who have all called for diplomatic solutions.

‘American people have other priorities’

Preston said American military action against North Korea under the Trump administration was “unlikely” because US military officials would oppose it and the Republican “tends to be very deferent to military opinion.”

“There is a wide range of areas in which Trump has shifted his own positions out of deference to the judgment of the military hierarchy and I don’t think that the American military establishment is fund of the idea” of a war with North Korea because it would be “devastating.”

Citing the “disastrous” US-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Preston said a direct military confrontation with Pyongyang would be “even more disastrous.”

Another reason that made the war unlikely, according to Preston, was the fact that the American public was preoccupied with more important problems like the economy, immigration and healthcare and didn’t pay much attention to tensions with North Korea.

 

Two (or More) Sides to Every Story 1

A Facebook friend has this to say about North Korea:

HOW IS IT THAT WE DO NOT FIND IT OBSCENE AND REVOLTING that the USA media openly talk about a murderous military invasion of North Korea, for the sole asserted reason that North Korea wants to develop a credible (and obviously needed) nuclear deterrent?

In many decades the most militarily aggressive nations that have nuclear weapons have clearly been the USA and Israel. What country that is in the sights of these two violent nations would not want nuclear weapons as freaking soon as possible? I sure would. This is especially true in light of North Korea’s history (below). Yet we don’t find it obscene that the USA and its media openly talk about murdering the entire nation with a military invasion because it dares to want to have the only military deterrent that could work against USA madness. Insane.

Michael Mac Aodha: “It is some Orwellian “Two Minutes Hate” for us to be freaking out about North Korea. Super brief history: Korea was colonized in 1910 by Japan, liberated by Moscow in August 1945, and went to war with US and the US-backed forces in South Korea in 1951. By 1953 the US Air Force ran out of military targets and started bombing dams to flood rice fields and cause starvation. North Korea has never forgotten, and formally the war has never ended. Until very recently both countries have claimed ALL of Korea. Both countries didn’t join UN until1991. In 1994 NK signed on to the Agreed Framework with US, but Washington dragged its feet while NK upheld their end of the bargain. They gave our government a chance to make peace and we blew it. They know, just like we claim for ourselves, that they have to have nukes to deter and to compel others to have dialog. US opposes banning nukes every year because we don’t want to get rid of our leverage, yet we can’t see that with North Korea, a much weaker and vulnerable country really facing existential threats. We depict them as irrational, hostile boogeymen bent on world domination—an image that more reflects our own government. We are being jingoistic about North Korea. We misunderstand them and are thirsty for blood. US and South Korea just held major military exercises running through plans of overthrowing the North, and Japan’s prime minister is trying to get their constitution rewritten so they can go to war again North Korea. But even USA Today, a conservative newspaper, admits that all they want is (1) guarantees from the US that we want try and overthrow them; (2) to keep their nukes for assurances; (3) lifting of sanctions; (4) removal of US troops from South Korea; and (5) a peace treaty with South Korea. That last one is a significant concession. The North is foregoing their claim to ALL of Korea and is willing to formally recognize them as a sovereign country that they want to have normalized peace relations with. All very reasonable stuff, but look how we’re acting.”

Image may contain: 1 person, text

Korea and the Art of the Deal Reply

Bill Lind on why North Korea is just an extension of traditional Korea.

By William S. Lind

Traditional Right

As North Korea inches its way toward possessing an ICBM than can hit the United States with a nuclear warhead–both of dubious reliability–we can expect a Korean “crisis” to grow. In fact, there need be no crisis. A deal with North Korea is not difficult to envision, and America now has a president who is good at making deals.

The conventional wisdom presents North Korea as a rogue state ruled by a madman, Kim Jong Un. He, and it, are irrational, dangerous, and impossible to predict. Sanctions having failed, we must pile up more sanctions. There is no alternative to growing hostility between North Korea and the U.S., a course which is likely at some point to lead to war. In the meantime, we must keep thousands of U.S. troops in South Korea, a country far stronger than North Korea.

But there is another way to look at the situation, one that sees continuity rather than irrationality in North Korean policy. For centuries, Korea, then one country, was known as the “Hermit Kingdom”. Like Japan under the last Shogunate, Korea was closed to foreigners, trade, and all outside contact. Its government, a monarchy, was centralized, powerful, and all-controlling. An “ideology” of sorts, Confucianism, was the only tolerated way of thinking. The king was regarded as semi-divine.

From this perspective, today’s North Korea is merely an extension of historic Korea. The Kims are a new dynasty, behaving very much like the old dynasty. North Korea’s legitimacy is rooted in this continuity; it is South Korea, not North Korea, that is a historic anomaly.

READ MORE