Democratic criticism of Trump-Kim meeting show deep division in US Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

US Democrats’ widespread criticism of President Donald Trump’s recent meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is indicative of a deep division in Washington, where political interests shape the foreign policy, says an American political analyst.

Democratic presidential hopefuls and lawmakers launched a direct attack on Trump over his spur-of-the-moment decision to meet Kim at the Demilitarized Zone separating South Korea from the North on Sunday.

They also objected to Trump’s move in crossing the border into South Korea as the first ever American president.

A spokesman for leading Democratic candidate and former vice president Joe Biden, blasted Trump for “coddling” Kim “at the expense of American national security and interests.”

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who enjoys the second strongest following among the aspirants, said the president was “squandering American influence on photo ops and exchanging love letters” with Kim.

Senator Bernie Sanders, almost next in popularity to Warren, said the move had “weakened the State Department.”

Keith Preston, director of Attackthesystem.com, said Democrats were looking to “weaponize” the meeting and use it to their own advantage.

“Foreign policy has simply become an issue that political parties are using to weaponize against each other,” he told Press TV on Monday.

“The Democratic Party politicians are simply trying to attack Donald Trump and it wouldn’t matter what he did,” the Virginia-based analyst argued.

PressTV-Democrats lay into Trump after Kim meeting

PressTV-Democrats lay into Trump after Kim meetingDemocratic presidential hopefuls and lawmakers have launched a direct attack on President Trump over his decision to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Preston noted that it was always a positive development when two leaders decided to sit down and peacefully resolve their differences.

This is specially important for North Korea and the U,  as they both came within inches of nuclear war over Washington’s objections to Pyongyang’s nuclear tests and ballistic missiles programs.

During the DMZ meeting, which was their third, Trump and Kim agreed to resume talks after the collapse of the last meeting in Vietnam earlier this year.

“It is interesting that the Democrats are attacking the peace process simply for the purpose of scoring some political points,” Preston said.

“That actually reflects the kind of divisions that go on in our society at the present time” he continued, adding that the Democratic response to Trump’s meeting was “just another episode of partisan politics shaping foreign policy.”

Keith Preston: Trump’s willingness to abide by peace agreement with North Korea unclear Reply

Press TV. Listen here.

The government of North Korea is determined to establishing peaceful relations with the United States and denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula, but President Donald Trump’s willingness to abide by any agreement is unclear, says an American political analyst in Virginia.

“The regime of [North Korean leader] Kim Jong-un is serious about wanting to make some sort of international peace with the United States for a variety of reasons,” said Keith Preston, chief editor of AttacktheSystem.com.

“The evidence is that they are indeed sincere about wanting to pursue some sort of agreement with the United States; the question how much the United States going to be willing to give,” Preston told Press TV on Thursday.

Trump said Tuesday Washington was stopping “very provocative” and “very expensive” military exercises with South Korea to facilitate denuclearization negotiations with North Korea.

The United States and South Korea hold regular military drills to the fury of North Korea, which has long seen the drills as preparations to invade it.

“The war games are very expensive, we pay for the majority of them,” Trump told a news conference on in Singapore after a historic summit with Kim.

Trump’s announcement was a surprise even to the government of South Korean President Moon Jae-in, which worked in recent months to help bring about the Trump-Kim summit.

“We will be stopping the war games which will save us a tremendous amount of money, unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should. But we’ll be saving a tremendous amount of money, plus I think it’s very provocative,” Trump said.

Pentagon officials were not immediately able to provide any details about Trump’s remarks about suspending military drills, a step the US military has long resisted.

Trump and Kim promised in a joint statement to work toward the “denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula, and the United States promised its Cold War foe security guarantees.

Trump and Kim arrived in Singapore on Sunday to hold the first ever face-to-face meeting between leaders of the two countries, which have remained enemies since the 1950-1953 Korean War.

While the summit is seen as a test for diplomacy that could end the long-running nuclear standoff, foreign policy experts say the stakes are high if it does not result in a nuclear agreement.

What if Kim Jong-un is Looking to Liberalize? Reply

I’m inclined with the argument made in this article. It is likely that the DPRK is now where the Soviets were in the 1980s, i.e. it’s become a matter of reform or die.

By Peter Van Buren

The American Conservative

On April 27, North Korea’s Kim Jong-un and South Korean president Moon Jae-in will meet, ahead of a trilateral summit with President Trump in June. There is a lot to talk about, but the focus in the West on nuclear issues misses the real story: Kim may be seeking revolutionary economic upheaval. There are signs everything is about to change.

It isn’t hard to imagine Kim with a biography of former Chinese leader Deng Xiao-ping on his nightstand. Deng’s rise to power saw China’s centrally managed economy failing to feed its people, isolated from the world, and dependent on the Soviet Union. Then everything changed in 1979 when Deng secured an agreement with President Jimmy Carter that covered his security needs (no one seemed worried China had nukes), diplomatically papered over long-simmering political issues like the status of Taiwan, and allowed him to introduce changes that led directly to China’s economic ascendance.

A key sign Kim is headed the same way is the extraordinary number of concessions he has made ahead of his upcoming summits. Kim is acting like a man in a hurry.

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