What’s the Point of this Pan-Anarchist Revolution Thing, Anyway? 11

A reader on Facebook offers the following comments, and asks the following questions.

I’m not so sure how realistic sustained statelessness is without severe technological regression and economic collapse, but the obvious answer is that the vast majority of people would rather bask in the lazy comforts of delegated responsibility than take on the burdens and risks of freedom. The mantle of anarchism is often taken up as an immature pose that is rationalized after the fact, usually quite badly, before being discarded with age for whatever underlying tribal affiliation existed in the first place. It’s a knee-jerk rebellion against constraints on the self, for good or ill, and a justification for engaging in unreasonable or criminal behaviors whose motives are ultimately more personal than political.

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Dear Leftists: Going on Tucker Carlson Is Not Going to Stop Imperialism 1

There is quite a bit I disagree with in this article, but it is good to see someone from the Left arguing that anti-imperialism should be a priority issue.

By Noah Berlatsky

Pacific Standard

Tucker Carlson interviews Glenn Greenwald about U.S. strikes in Syria on April 10th, 2018.

Tucker Carlson interviews Glenn Greenwald about U.S. strikes in Syria on April 10th, 2018.

(Photo: YouTube)

“I just feel like I had my best girlfriend break up with me,” Alex Jones declared in a live rant last month during the American bombing of Syria. “I will tell Trump that you really betrayed your family and your name, and everything you stood for with this horse manure.”

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Dave Rubin Handles Protesters at University of New Hampshire 6

Dave goes back and forth with protesters during his entire speech to students at the University of New Hampshire. Due to security threats the University moved the venue from a 300 seat room to a 7500 seat hockey rink – without informing all of the attendees. This event was hosted by Turning Point USA.

The Day of Freedom Was Not a Far Right Rally Reply

By Andrew Doyle

Spiked Online

f you want to know why the left keeps losing, look no further than the fallout from last Sunday’s ‘Day for Freedom’ march in London. The event was publicised as a protest against the ongoing erosion of free speech in the UK, most notably through the increasingly draconian application of hate-speech laws. The man behind the march was Tommy Robinson, former leader of the EDL, who took umbrage at being permanently banned from Twitter for his incendiary remarks about Islam. Before long, a number of prominent right-wing activists offered their support, and even without mainstream media coverage the attendance figures were in the thousands.

How is it that the principle of free speech, the bedrock of any democratic society, has been claimed by the right?  Inevitably, right-wing media outlets such as Breitbart have declared the ‘Day for Freedom’ to be their victory. To an extent, they have a point. In recent years, the left has not only failed to defend freedom of expression, but has been actively hostile to it. Moreover, prominent left-wing voices have continually sought to broaden the scope of terms such as ‘far right’ and ‘alt-right’ to incorporate as many of their ideological opponents as possible. I can think of no strategy less likely to persuade and more likely to engender widespread resentment.

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Cultural Marxism v. Post-modernism: Paul Gottfried disagrees with Jordan Peterson Reply

For modern conservatives, a question looms large: Has cultural Marxism or post-modernism done more damage to society? Canada’s Jordan Peterson claims the latter, while Paul Gottfried — one of America’s most most serious paleo-conservative intellectuals, says the opposite. On this week’s episode of ‘The San Francisco Review of Books on Sunday,’ Gottfried explains why he thinks that cultural Marxism is far more serious than post-modernism and what this means not only for America, but Western Civilization.

Day for Freedom: An Insider’s View 1

A first person account of Sunday’s rally in London.

Millennial Transmissions

On May 6th, what was purported to be the biggest free speech event the UK has ever seen (a “free speech Woodstock”) took place outside of Whitehall. Far left activists and the mainstream media have labelled the demonstration as “fascist” and “far right” respectively, while alt-right white nationalist figures like Millennial Woes and Richard Spencer have disavowed the event as being “demoralising” and overly-liberal for being too inclusive of non-whites, homosexuals, “freaks” and “trannies.” But how was the view from inside?

The event was triggered by a collision of illiberal decisions made by the British state, especially over the last year. Non-violent right-wing speakers banned from the country on the ludicrous grounds of “anti-terrorism,” a legal crackdown on “offensive” jokes, extremely inconsistent application of “hate speech laws” (that, according to many people associated with the event, is disproportionately invoked to defend Islam from vilification) and what is perceived as a willful ignorance of pressing problems concerning crime, censorship, media bias, immigration and Islam (the last of which was especially prevalent, which we shall return to in due course) by the government and establishment media.

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EXCLUSIVE: RT speaks to Milo Yiannopoulos ahead of Day For Freedom rally Reply

RT UK speaks to author, commentator and self-proclaimed ‘provocateur’ Milo Yiannopoulos ahead of Sunday’s #DayForFreedom rally in London, where many are expected to protest in defence of free speech. Other controverisal figures, such as: Tommy Robinson, Lauren Southern, Gavin McInnes, Count Dankula & more, will be speaking at the event.

Romney praises Trump’s first year in office: It’s similar to things ‘I’d have done’ 1

Another former Never Trumper admits Trump turned out to be just another moderate Republican/neocon stooge, as all presidents ultimately do if they want to remain alive, out of jail, and employable when they leave office.

By John Bowden

MSN.Com

Mitt Romney wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building

Former GOP presidential nominee and current Senate candidate Mitt Romney praised President Trump’s first year in office on Tuesday, saying it was similar to what the first year of a Romney administration would look like.

In response to a question from a voter in Utah, Romney seemed to indicate that he largely approved of the policies pursued by the Trump administration during Trump’s first year in the White House, calling it “better than expected,” the Washington Examiner reports.

“His first year is very similar to things I’d have done my first year,” Romney said. “The things he’s actually done have been better than I expected.”

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Conservative Policy, Populist Attitude Reply

Benny Shapiro, a former Never Trumper, recognizes Trumpism has been totally and predictably coopted by the neocon/plutocrat/Zionist alliance that controls the GOP.

By Ben Shapiro

National Review

The danger is that the latter will toxify the former.

This was supposed to be the year conservatism saw its end.

Conservatism, we were led to believe, had run its course. Trump’s supporters cheered his campaign-trail heresies against Reagan-esque conservatism. “What has conservatism ever done for us?” we heard, time and again. Candidate Trump was among those pressing forward this talking point: “This is called the Republican party,” Trump reminded Americans in May 2016. “It’s not the Conservative party.”

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Marxists Look Back on the Russian Revolution Reply

If there is one thing anarchists should learn from history, it’s to never trust a commie. At least with fascists, you know where you stand.

By J.P. O’Malley

The American Conservative

October: The Story of the Russian Revolution, China Míeville, Verso, 384 pages.

The Dilemmas of Lenin: Terrorism, War, Empire, Love, Revolution, Tariq Ali, Verso, 384 pages.

On October 25, 1917, across the city of Petrograd, the Bolshevik party was preparing to take power from the Provisional Government that had overthrown the autocratic Tsarist regime the previous February. Vladimir Lenin, leader of the far-left Bolshevik movement, felt February’s coup had been premature and was run by what he viewed as hypocritical liberals who merely sought a moderate polity based on the values of social democracy.

Sensing a historic moment, Lenin sat down to draft a proclamation for what he believed would be the coming of a worldwide socialist revolution. He wrote: “To the citizens of Russia: The cause for which the people have fought, namely…the abolition of landed proprietorship, workers’ control over production, and the establishment of Soviet power, has been secured. Long live the workers’, soldiers’, and peasants’ revolution!”

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Who Is Candace Owens? 7 Things To Know About Kanye’s Fave And The Next ‘Tomi Lahren’ Reply

By Rebekah Kuschmider

YourTango.Com

who is candace owens

Who is Candace Owens and why is Yeezy tweeting about her?

Who is Candace Owens? If you’d never heard of Candace Owens before yesterday you’re not alone. The conservative commentator who’s been called the ‘next Tomi Lahren’ and YouTube star was working her way up the media ladder slowly until she got a huge social media boost — from Kanye West.

The hip-hop star and Kardashian spouse busted Owens’ world wide open when he tweeted:

 

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America’s Polarization Has Nothing To Do With Ideology Reply

Conservative author George Hawley on why the Left/Right Red/Blue Alt-Right/Antifa tribal civil war is a smokescreen. Economics and social class aren’t the main issues either. Americans largely agree on those issues. My advice to ATS supporters and readers is to avoid being distracted by these “issues,” and keep your eyes on the prize. It is the system that is our enemy, and it is the largely non-ideological but anti-establishment “radical center” we need to reach at this point.

By George Hawley

The American Conservative

Although a seemingly simple concept, the issue of polarization has long frustrated political scientists. A superficial examination of the American political scene suggests an intensely polarized electorate, divided along partisan and ideological lines. Watching cable news, we see competing camps that have few points of agreement, with anger the dominant emotion. Yet a dive into public opinion on questions of policy tells a different story.

In 2004, Stanford University political science professor Morris Fiorina and his colleagues persuasively argued that Americans are not bitterly divided on the most contentious policy questions, that in fact Americans lack true ideological convictions. Their argument today remains as sound as ever.

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When Conservatives Become Outcasts Reply

The Southern Poverty Law Center now attacks religious conservatives and mainstream political conservatives in the same way it attacks white supremacist organizations. The further leftward the wider society, government and culture drift, the more people and groups with “conservative” values will be on the receiving end of such attacks. It will be interesting to see if these groups retain their traditional patriotism the more they are regarded as outcasts, or whether they will (hopefully) embrace “anti-Americanism.”

By Carol Swain

First Things

Catholics, Evangelical Christians, and pro-family organizations have a common adversary, one that is virulent and relentless. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is a powerful progressive advocacy group that says its primary mission is to fight hatred, teach tolerance, and seek justice. Despite its noble beginnings in the years following the civil rights movement, during which it fought white supremacist groups resisting social change and the rule of law, the SPLC now works to advance the agenda of the cultural left. Ironically, given the deeply Christian character of the civil rights movement, the SPLC now equates traditional Christian and pro-family organizations with hate groups such as the Aryan Nations, the Ku Klux Klan, and neo-Nazis. What makes these religious groups an SPLC target? A shared biblical worldview that condemns homosexuality and transgenderism.

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The Ugly Coded Critique of Chick-Fil-A’s Christianity Reply

Liberal and left hysteria over “Chick-Fil-A” coming to town is reminiscent of the way the religious right would react to the opening of an adult bookstore or a gay bar back in the day. This article also makes an interesting point about demographics.

By Stephen Carter

Bloomberg.Com

The New Yorker has been taking it on the chin lately for its essay about Chick-fil-A’s “infiltration” of New York City. Although most of the piece is about the evils of fast food and the chain’s ubiquitous “Eat Mor Chikin” advertising campaign, the essay has been excoriated for its anti-Christian tone. “The brand’s arrival here feels like an infiltration, in no small part because of its pervasive Christian traditionalism,” we’re told. Not just that: “Its headquarters, in Atlanta, are adorned with Bible verses and a statue of Jesus washing a disciple’s feet. Its stores close on Sundays.” And lest we forget: “The restaurant’s corporate purpose still begins with the words ‘to glorify God.’”

What the author really seems angry about is that the company’s CEO opposes same-sex marriage. But the framing of the piece made Christianity the villain, and the headline — “Chick-fil-A’s Creepy Infiltration of New York City” — was sufficiently troubling that Nate Silver quickly tweeted “This is why Trump won.” Fair point. Religious bigotry is always dangerous. But there’s a deeper problem here, a difficulty endemic to today’s secular left: an all-too-frequent weird refusal to acknowledge the demographics of Christianity. When you mock Christians, you’re not mocking who you think you are.

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