California secession effort still alive Reply

By Jeff Horseman

The Press-Enterprise

A movement to split California into two states continues more than a year after a Riverside County supervisor’s anger with Sacramento led him to propose secession.

Since Supervisor Jeff Stone first brought up secession in July 2011, he’s helped form a group to pursue the idea. That group, California Rebellion 2012, has a website, is getting ready to accept donations and is planning a rally for sometime next spring.

Stone proposed forming South California out of 13 existing counties right after state lawmakers voted to divert roughly $14 million in vehicle license fee revenue from four fledgling Riverside County cities: Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Wildomar and Menifee.

More…

Reverse Oppression: A Fad that Needs to End Reply

And don’t tell me it will help straight/white people understand oppression. Because if a privileged person will only hear about prejudiced issues when it comes from a privileged mouth then what is the point? I’ve said this before when we’ve had similar bullshit, how are you going to encourage people to address prejudice and marginalisation while at the same time training them that it’s only worth listening to privileged people?

Because that’s what I hear when this excuse is trawled out. Straight, white people can’t possibly empathise with a POC or GBLT protagonist so we have to present these prejudiced issues through a privileged lens, from a privileged mouth. Either by making being privileged a marginalisation like in the examples above – or by making up an entirely new, fictional prejudice. As we’ve mentioned before with the appropriation of magrinalised groups for “fantastic prejudice” where vampires/fae/witches are persecuted for not being mundane humans. This can even be doubly offensive when we mix both offensive appropriations – such as in Lost Girl – with the white Kenzi being oppressed by the Black fae for being human. More…

Radical Small Nation Self-Determination in a Chaotic Meganation World Reply

By Thomas Naylor

Second Vermont Republic

A Meganation World

Much to the chagrin of Washington and Tel Aviv, a recent meeting of the so-called Non-Aligned Movement, a group formed during the Cold War that views itself as independent of the major powers, sent a clear signal to the US-Israeli cabal that they are visibly annoyed at the United States and Israel for continuing to portray Iran as the world’s foremost scapegoat. The meeting which took place in Tehran on August 26-31 proved to be a public relations coup for Iran in spite of UN Secretary General and American pawn Ban Ki-moon’s attempt to hijack the meeting.

The NAM represents nearly two-thirds of the nations of the world, most of whom are small and poor. However, their membership does include four meganations which have populations in excess of 100 million – Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, and Nigeria.

More…

The Waning of the Modern Ages – Time to Abolish the American Dream Reply

By Morris Berman

Counterpunch

La longue durée —the long run—was an expression made popular by the Annales School of French historians led by Fernand Braudel, who coined the phrase in 1958. The basic argument of this school is that the proper concern of historians should be the analysis of structures that lie at the base of contemporary events. Underneath short-term events such as individual cycles of economic boom and bust, said Braudel, we can discern the persistence of “old attitudes of thought and action, resistant frameworks dying hard, at times against all logic.” An important derivative of the Annales research is the work of the World Systems Analysis school, including Immanuel Wallerstein and Christopher Chase-Dunn, which similarly focuses on long-term structures: capitalism, in particular.

The “arc” of capitalism, according to this school, is about 600 years long, from 1500 to 2100. It is our particular (mis)fortune to be living through the beginning of the end, the disintegration of capitalism as a world system. It was mostly commercial capital in the sixteenth century, evolving into industrial capital in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and then moving on to financial capital—money created by money itself, and by speculation in currency—in the twentieth and twenty-first. In dialectical fashion, it will be the very success of the system that eventually does it in.

More…

The Kamajors of Sierra Leone: A Model for Survival Reply

by CYA

Survival Blog

Those that are concerned with TEOTWAWKI scenarios, as we are, can find great benefit in looking to history for meaningful lessons on what to expect and how to plan and prepare. In many of these circles we often here of and reference the heroic exploits of bands of citizen warriors throughout history.

Rogers Rangers, the Minute Men of New England, The Green Mountain Boys of Vermont and other Revolutionary War militia, The guerilla fighting Comanche and Cheyenne warriors of North America,  and of course the various books, movies and television shows that constitute our survivalist-militia paradigm. I wish to add another relevant and realistic event and militia group to our lexicon and highlight a bit of recent history that took place just about 3,000 miles from North America. This true and well-documented period of time and events can be mined by our communities for numerous insights into preparedness.

More…

Five lessons from the de-listing of MEK as a terrorist group Reply

The Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK), or People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, is an Iranian dissident group that has been formally designated for the last 15 years by the US State Department as a “foreign terrorist organization”. When the Bush administration sought to justify its attack on Iraq in 2003 by accusing Saddam Hussein of being a sponsor of “international terrorism”, one of its prime examples was Iraq’s “sheltering” of the MEK. Its inclusion on the terrorist list has meant that it is a felony to provide any “material support” to that group.

Nonetheless, a large group of prominent former US government officials from both political parties has spent the last several years receiving substantial sums of cash to give speeches to the MEK, and have then become vocal, relentless advocates for the group, specifically for removing them from the terrorist list. Last year, the Christian Science Monitor thoroughly described “these former high-ranking US officials – who represent the full political spectrum – [who] have been paid tens of thousands of dollars to speak in support of the MEK.” They include Democrats Howard Dean, Ed Rendell, Wesley Clark, Bill Richardson, and Lee Hamilton, and Republicans Rudy Giuliani, Fran Townsend, Tom Ridge, Michael Mukasey, and Andrew Card. Other prominent voices outside government, such as Alan Dershowitz and Elie Wiesel, have been enlisted to the cause and are steadfast MEK advocates. More…

The radical right-wing roots of Occupy Wall Street Reply

By Maureen Tkacik
Reuters

If there’s one thing that united Occupy Wall Street with the Tea Party movement from the very beginning, it’s a virulent aversion to being compared to each other.

The Tea Partiers started sharpening their knives before the Occupation even began. Two weeks before last year’s launch Tea Partisan blogger Bob Ellis wrote a post entitled “Socialists Plan to Rage Against Freedom on Constitution Day” – all but daring the lamestream punditry to compare the “infantile” plans of “spoiled children” to “throw tantrums” and “thumb their nose at the American way of life” to the beloved movement that “sprang up from nothing a little more than two years ago in the face of a Marxist president and Marxist congress.”

More…

Turns Out Where You Live Really Does Shape Who You Are Reply

By Emily Badger

The Atlantic Cities

Turns Out Where You Live Really Does Shape Who You Are
Shutterstock

Mark Twain penned a famous line more than a century ago neatly distilling the distinct cultures of the three largest cities in the American Northeast. “In Boston,” he wrote, “they ask, ‘How much does he know?’ In New York, ‘How much is he worth?’ In Philadelphia, ‘Who were his parents?’”

Boston has been, since its earliest days, a city of higher education, New York a city of financial might, and Philadelphia a city of historical lineage. To this day – Twain wrote this in 1899 – much about his assessment still holds. We often joke about what these cultural legacies mean for ourselves (Chicagoans are so sensible, Angelenos so flaky, people in Salt Lake City so self-reliant). But it turns out there is in fact plenty of truth to the notion that the places where we live influence how we view the world and our role in it.

More…

“Sovereign Citizens” and Government’s Monopoly on Crime Reply

By William N. Grigg

Pro Libertate

Robert Paudert refers to May 20, 2010 – the day his son Brandon was killed — as the “worst day of my life, ever.” Given that losing a child is the worst thing that can happen to a parent, Paudert isn’t exaggerating.

Brandon Paudert was an officer in the West Memphis, Arkansas Police Department. At the time Brandon was killed, Robert was the town’s police chief; Brandon’s partner, Officer Bill Evans, was his cousin.

Until about 11:00 a.m. on that fatal day, Officers Paudert and Evans, who were assigned to the narcotics interdiction team, had maintained surveillance on what they considered to be a “suspicious” rental truck. It turned out that the vehicle wasn’t being used to ferry narcotics; it was filled with household possessions belonging to a pleasant grandmother who was probably puzzled by the unwanted attention she had received from the local police.

Is Obama gay? Reply

by John Craig

Just Not Said

When I first heard a few days ago that Obama might be gay, my initial reaction was, that’s ridiculous. He’s married, has two kids, and he’s never set off my gaydar. I had read a few years ago about Larry Sinclair’s claims of having given Obama oral sex in the back of a limousine when Obama was a state senator. But at the time I just figured that any famous person is bound to attract a few loonies who will say anything to get publicity.

But after I read the article linked two posts ago (and directly below), I started reading more about Obama’s gayness, and after a while, it just made too much sense not to be true.

More…

To Arms! Reply

by William Crosby Prentice

Survival Blog

The title of this essay could be either a call to action, or a toast to weapons.  Either way, the purpose is to discuss the decision of whether or not, and to what extent, a person should be armed.  The author is biased in favor of being as heavily armed as is legal under any given circumstances, and has a hard time coming up with reasons for not being armed.

The Right of Self Defense

I would bet that nearly all of those that regularly visit SurvivalBlog will agree that a person has a natural right, independent of and senior to any legal system, to defend his life and property.  This audience would also tend to agree that this right extends to defending others who are under an attack that could result in their loss of life or sustaining great bodily injury.

More…

Romney video: Palestinians not interested in peace Reply

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON —

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney told donors in a newly released video clip that Palestinians “have no interest” in peace with Israel and suggested that efforts at Mideast peace under his administration would languish.

Romney says that Palestinians are “committed to the destruction and elimination of Israel” and that the prospects for a two-state solution to Mideast peace were dim.

“You hope for some degree of stability, but you recognize that this is going to remain an unsolved problem and we kick the ball down the field and hope that ultimately, somehow, something will happen and resolve it,” Romney said.

More…

From spark to flare to wildfire: Lierre Keith’s Ode to Vermont Independence Reply

via The VT Commons

I bring greetings from Cascadia. They’re watching on the livestream. This I know: the day will come when the whole world will be watching you, Vermont.

It’s a tremendous honor to be here. When you had your first convention in 2005, I came up from Massachusetts to attend. I had to. It wasn’t just intellectual curiosity—though it was that. And it wasn’t just to lend moral support, though it was that, too. And it wasn’t that fine and righteous feeling of incipient rebellion. It was those three words: Second Vermont Republic. Those three words are a spark that could set history on fire.

More…

QE3: The Beginning Of The End Reply

By Russell D. Longcore

Dump DC

The Federal Reserve flushed the toilet Thursday…and by extension Washington and the US economy are beginning to pick up speed as they circle the drain.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke announced Thursday September 13th that the Fed would be buying $40 Billion per month in mortgage-backed securities indefinitely into the future. The reason he gave was to “see more progress (in job growth)”. He said “the program should increase downward pressure on interest rates,” supposedly to encourage more home sales and refinancing.

When challenged about low interest rates hurting savers, Bernanke said the low rates help the value of homes. What he does not say is that the entire housing market is built upon a balloon of debt, and that home values are only where they are today because of inflation.

More…

The Rebel: Interview with Venner Reply

Translated By Michael O’Meara

New European Conservative

Translator’s Note:

It’s a testament to the abysmal state of our culture that hardly one of Dominique Venner’s more than forty books have been translated into English. Venner is more than a gifted historian who has made major contributions to the most important chapters of modern, especially twentieth-century European history. He’s played a key role in both the development of the European New Right and the “Europeanization” of continental nationalism.

It is his “rebel heart” that explains his engagement in these great struggles, as well as his interests in the Russian Revolution, German fascism, French national socialism, the US Civil War, and the two world wars. The universe found in his works is one reminiscent of Ernst von Salomon’s Die Geächteten — one of the Homeric epics of our age.

The following interview is about the rebel. Unlike the racial conservatives dominant in US white nationalist ranks, European nationalism still bears traces of its revolutionary heritage — opposed as it is not merely to the alien, anti-national forces, but to the entire liberal modernist subversion, of which the United States has been the foremost exemplar.

More…

African-American Christians waver over vote Reply

By Rachel Zoll

AP

Some black clergy see no good presidential choice between a Mormon candidate and one who supports gay marriage, so they are telling their flocks to stay home on Election Day. That’s a worrisome message for the nation’s first African-American president, who can’t afford to lose any voters from his base in a tight race.

The pastors say their congregants are asking how a true Christian could back same-sex marriage, as President Barack Obama did in May. As for Republican Mitt Romney, the first Mormon nominee from a major party, congregants are questioning the theology of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its former ban on men of African descent in the priesthood.

More…

Attackers Of Base In Afghanistan Wore U.S. Uniforms Reply

By Steve Mullis

NPR

Coalition authorities say the insurgents that attacked British military base Camp Bastion in Afghanistan, which killed two U.S. Marines, were wearing U.S. Army uniforms.

In a statement released by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), they said the attack by the 15 insurgents, who were organized into three teams, was well coordinated and that the insurgents were “trained and rehearsed.”

The insurgents were armed with automatic rifles, rocket-propelled grenade launchers and suicide vests, the statement said. They attacked Coalition aircraft, destroying six Harrier fighter jets and damaging two others.

More…

Ben Bernanke rescues the US economy from the nihilism of the right Reply

By Robin Wells

The Gaurdian

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke

On Thursday, the Federal Reserve delivered a bold program of quantitative easing presaged by comments from Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke at the Jackson Hole economic symposium in August. Photograph: Reuters

Last month, at the Federal Reserve‘s Jackson Hole conference, Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke told the audience:

“The stagnation of the labor market is a grave concern not only because of the enormous suffering and waste of human talent it entails, but also because persistently high levels of unemployment will wreak structural damage on our economy that could last for many years.”

This week, Bernanke assumed the obligation of those words as the Fed announced Thursday that it will engage in another round of quantitative easing – the so-called QE3 – through open-ended purchases of $40bn of mortgage debt per month. Furthermore, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) declared its intent to hold the federal funds rate – the interest rate that the Fed directly controls – near zero “at least through mid-2015”.

More…