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The Religious Right: Not So Worried About Morals After All

By Bill Anderson.

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As the returns from South Carolina come in, we find that about two-thirds of SC Republican voters are evangelicals, and the evangelicals have spoken loudly: If Democrats are adulterers, they are evil, but if it is a Republican, well, all is forgiven. I’m sure that the Bob Jones University crowd gave serial adulterer Newt its thumbs up. Hey, at least Bill and Hillary Clinton are still together.

During the Clinton years, we heard from evangelicals ad nauseum that character mattered. Well, here is Newt Gingrich, a man who was banging his campaign workers, demanding an “open marriage,” and had the moral compass of a shark. This is the man evangelicals support? And then evangelicals wonder why people on the left see them as hypocrites and moral cowards.

So, the people who claim to follow Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace, display their beliefs through candidates like Newt Gingrich. These are the people who jeered Ron Paul when he called for Americans to live by the Golden Rule that Christ Himself taught us. It is beyond me, and I have been part of the evangelical subculture for all of my life.

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3 replies »

  1. If the “Christian Right” now finds Gingrich to be an acceptable candidate, even if his personal life mirrors their arch-nemesis Bill Clinton, then what that means is that the “Christian Right” really stands for nothing other being pro-war, pro-Israel, and ostensibly at least for lower taxes. In other words, they’re absolutely no different from the secular and/or Jewish neocons. There’s really nothing distinctively Christian about them. That more or less means the end of their movement. They’re just an appendage to the neocons now just like neocon Catholics like William Bennett, Michael Novack or (in his later years) William F. Buckley.

  2. I would agree, Keith. I tell people all the time that Dispensationalism is not traditional Christianity and that neoconservatism is not traditional Southern politics. I’ve convinced a lot of people but it’s an uphill struggle.

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