Updated News Digest August 31, 2008 2

Quote of the Week:

“We can expect as little from society as from the state. Salvation lies with the individual.”

                                                                                                             -Ernst Junger

 

Neocon Leader Bill Kristol Calls on McCain to pick Lieberman as his Running Mate (Dog?)

Fed-Bank-Wall Street Fraud

Biden for Vice-Dictator by Glenn Greenwald

When the Cure is Worse Than the Disease by Bill Sardi

World War Looms by Simon Jenkins

You Can’t Trust the FDIC by Doug French

Tribal Syndicates Block Sale of Amazonian Lands

The Underground History of American Education by John Taylor Gatto

Russell Kirk, the Canon and the Conservative Movement by Gerald Russello

Did Somebody Say Elitism? by Taki Theodoracopulos

Mika Etchebehere, POUM Militia Captain by Larry Gambone

The Long Silence: American Jews and the Palestinians by Howard Lisnoff

New Issue of “Republic” Magazine Is Out! (Thanks to Flavio Goncalves)

Traitors Beware: A History of Robert DePugh’s Minutemen by Eric Beckemeier (Thanks to Ean Frick)

Anarcho-Syndicalism in Brazil

Black Fez Manifesto by Hakim Bey

Toward Secession by Richard Kostelanetz

Big-Tittied Terrorists

Democrats Claim Racism is the Only Reason Obama Will Lose (Go figure!)

Driving With Air Fresheners is Suspicious

Foreign Lobbyists and the Making of US Foreign Policy by Justin Raimondo

The Hideous Horror of the Biden Selection by Arthur Silber

Pushing Russia Into the Cold by Pat Buchanan

War with Russia is on the Agenda by Paul Craig Roberts

On Obama’s Move to the Center by Joe Bageant

McCain-The Ugliest American

Strip-Search Nation by Dave Lindorff

The Politics of Avoidance by Ralph Nader

Saakashvili: The gun went off by itself while I was just holding it  by Steve Sailer

Milwaukee City Government Steals Disabled Man’s Home

Failed States and Other Good News by William Norman Grigg

Bush’ Armada of Aggression by Gary North

The Militarized States of America by Fred Reed

Both Parties Want Dictatorship by Lew Rockwell

Obama’s Cheney by Justin Raimondo

Obama’s Fascist Security Corps by Dario McDarby

What If Obama Loses? by Pat Buchanan

The Obama Transformation: From Antiwar Leftist to Liberal Hawk by Richard Spencer

How to Make Health Care Anarchistically Better by Francois Tremblay

McCain’s Useful Fools by Libby Spencer

Poison As Food, Poison As Antidote by Roderick T. Long

How the Chicago Boys Wrecked the Economy by Mike Whitney

Berkeley Activists Attacked by PIGS

Anarchists Attack Wells Fargo in Minneapolis

Three Greek Anarchists Arrested in Big Kidnapping Case

Jailed Cuban Punk Rocker to Stand Trial Friday

Goodbye by Charley Reese (he’s retiring)

When Desertion is a Duty by William Norman Grigg

Massive Police Raids on Protestors in Minneapolis by Glenn Greenwald

A Map of US Military Presence All Over the World

A Better Question Might Be, “How Isn’t It Fascism?” by Tom Harrington

America’s Unwelcome Advances by Chalmers Johnson

Stunning Statistics on Prison Labor by Francois Tremblay

Paleos for Palin? Not This One by Dylan Waco

The Ethics of the Homestead Strike by Shawn Wilbur

This is the Face of Fascism by Mona

Obama’s Speech, McCain’s Palinomy by Alexander Cockburn

Missouri Police Kill Motorist for Driving Poorly 

Sufic Notes on Proudhon, Rothbard and Anarchism 5

(Thanks, Sean!) 

[These are my musings from correspondence with a like-minded proprietor of a homepage, which I thought some here would find interesting. -SJ]:
 
Sufic Notes on Proudhon, Rothbard and Anarchism
 
I concur with your disavowal from the false dialectic of Left and Right: We have transcended beyond that limited spectrum and have arrived at a Third Position, one which seeks a comprehensive solution outside the dominant framework. We should not remain conditioned to this evolutionist dialectic which views everything based upon an ill-defined spectrum of “right” and “left”. Shaykh Abdalqadir as-Sufi has written on this matter under his Scottish birth-name:
 
“The false dialectic of capital and communism, right and left, has for decades veiled from thinking people the possibility of grasping that what happened after 1945 was not only the collapse of the final phase of christian culture but the rise of a syncretic pseudo-culture, grafted onto the ruins of the old. A juden-kultur disguised as the previous model, but replacing it with a set of new values and expression whose unique driving force was the thrust of the market economy in its moments of expansion” (Ian Dallas, Oedipus and Dionysus, Freibourg Books, 1992).
 
I would also agree with your admiration for anarchism, purely in its classical sense and not the modern (mis)understanding. True anarchism is the anarchism of the Syndicalists and not the Cultural Marxists who have hijacked the movement to promote “alternative lifestyles” and the Cult of Political Correctness. It is a harmless nuisance which the elite tolerates since it does nothing to disrupt their power-structures.
 
Economics the Enemy of Anarchists
 
Proudhon’s maxim that “Anarchy is Order” brings to the surface a deep metaphysical reality latent until then. For he recognized that economics was a new religion and that economic ideas would become deified on an altar of ritualistic servitude. The masses are conditioned to believe that usury and taxation are two necessities of life (i.e., the old adage that nothing is certain except for death and taxes, and the fact that the Federal Reserve’s manipulation of interest rates is accepted as a gospel truth by those in awe of the economists).
 
Umar Ibrahim Vadillo has pointed out that the deification of economics has an esoteric underpinning. The rise of the State cannot be divorced from the rise of the modern bank. The two have a symbiotic relation, as both derive from esoteric origins. The State serves to perpetuate Finance, and vice versa. To increase their hold upon the society, they have reduced the temporal power of religions so that the latter serve to provide theological justification for the State. To quote Proudhon:
 
“The economic idea of capitalism, the politics of government or of authority, and the theological idea of the Church are three identical ideas, linked in various ways. To attack one of them is equivalent to attacking all of them….What capital does to labor, and the State to liberty, the Church does to the spirit. This trinity of absolutism is as baneful in practice as it is in philosophy. The most effective means for oppressing the people would be simultaneously to enslave its body, its will and its reason” (Les confessions d’un revolutionnaire, Paris: Garnier, 1851, p. 271). 
 
Nihilism and Violence for its own Sake
 
Proudhon shunned nihilism, warning in no uncertain terms about the need for political movements to adopt a political agenda. He was reluctant to support the revolutionaries of 1848 at first, due to their violence. He came to oppose the new revolutionary regime, since it sacrificed socio-economic reforms for political reform. History demonstrates that revolutions have always succeeded when they had a clear program outlined and failed when they worshipped violence. Proudhon understood this danger of political movements:
 
“He saw that their intellectual paralysis was the cause of helpless nihilist terrorism. Political idealism, once put in place, enforces an increasing separation between the outside world and the membership. In order to create a sense of progress among the membership, the critique of the outside world, seen as part of education, has to aggressively increase in magnitude week after week. This tendency, once adopted, leads inevitably to an absurd dualism consisting of an utterly demonised outside world and an undeserved assumption of pure goodness on their own part. This is what Carl Schmitt (d. 1985) defined as political theology. One side of this nihilistic philosophy produces helpless terrorism and suicidal strategies” (Vadillo, The Esoteric Deviation in Islam, CapeTown: Madinah Press, 2003, pp. 534-535).
 
Proudhon understood clearly that the socio-economic reforms were more pertinent than the political reform, as reforms at this realm would naturally lead to those at the political realm. In this regard, it is quite interesting that all those screaming for “change” in this country likewise talk merely in political terms, ignoring any consideration for monetary reform or changing the economic structures at a fundamental level. Rather, they all serve to perpetuate the State just like their alleged opposite.
 
His opposition to nihilism also has relevance to our own opposition to the neo-Takfiri heresy. They scream at the top of their lungs about “Jihad” and declaring takfir of the governments, but they offer no program once they (hypothetically) come to power. In this sense the program of the Jihadi movements is nihilistic: an endless cycle of violence seemingly for the sake of violence, hence their focus on martyrdom. So rather than providing real solutions to remedy the situation, it is actually an escape from realities.
 
Usury and Wage-Labor
 
Proudhon opposed anyone who earned their income from rent, interest, and wage labor. He recognized that the workers create a productive capacity greater than their individual sum, but they don’t come to benefit from their own labor. Here the materialist device of “freedom” comes to play: Exercise your “freedom” to enter into a subservient work position or your “freedom” to not work, at which case the conditions of the society will ensure that you lose the basic human freedoms.
 
This is why successive opponents of the State have called for a return to the Guild-System, which they now understood was the only structure which could transform the society and eliminate the State. The workers of the Guilds were far more “free” (to use the modern rhetoric) than the workers in this age of “rights”, where employment is the new framework of relations and wages become the only fruits of labor. This fact has been expressed by Vadillo:
 
“The slave is now called the employee. This employee belongs to a class of employees. Freedom, as understood by medieval guilds which upheld a social ethos in which the master/apprentice relationship dominated the degrading employer/employee relationship of today, was already superior to what was being aimed at under the banner of rights. But guilds became viewed as centres of resistance to the
centralisation of the power of the state and therefore in their view an impediment to progress. The words liberty, equality, fraternity meant very little more than the paper they were written on. In their name the guilds that dominated the Middle Ages were abolished giving way to the capitalist wage system. We have accepted the idea that employment is a decent goal for the unemployed, without confronting the fact that employment is the lowest form of economic activity: that is, a man reduced to mechanical functions,
deprived of the capacity to fully enjoy the fruits of his work. This fact is today ignored, neither understood nor realised by the modern analysts within the new economic ethos. And yet this man, who is a slave by most standards of the past, is considered free because it says so in the constitution” (Vadillo, op. cit., pp. 142-143).
 
Private Property
 
I would finally concur with your point about an individual’s right to hold property. The “property” that was condemned by Proudhon was solely the type that was used and abused according to the whims of the one holding it, while true private ownership of land possesses it so as to maintain economic independence. He championed the rights of the small landowners against the State, for which he was criticized by Marx (who actually sought to increase the power of the State against the workers). Proudhon recognized “property is the only power that can act as a counterweight to the State” (Theory of Property).
 
The right of private ownership of property was already recognized before even the creation of human beings as was noted by the Qur’an: “Wa iz’ qaala Rabbuka lil-Malaa’ikati, ‘Inni jaa’ilunfil-ardi Khalifah’” (Sura al-Baqara, verse 30). “Behold, they Lord said to the angels, ‘I will create a vicegerent on earth.’”
 
This verse speaks about successive generations upon the earth, but more importantly it mentions that we have been entrusted with the land as an awqaf. This was also exemplified in the Guilds, which ensured a social network of welfare for the members and through which they could find their livelihood. We recognize that any elimination of the State means the evolution (excuse the word) of decentralized Guilds and communities as the new structure of our societies.
 
Rothbard as a Complement to Proudhon
 
The importance of private property as a protection of individual rights at the expense of the State was studied by Murray Rothbard. He was in many senses a complement to Proudhon, providing further intellectual framework for anarchism in a mass-industrialized society. This is the importance of Anarcho-Capitalists or Anarcho-Libertarians, who covered up the faults of the Anarcho-Syndicalists in monetary issues and closed these gaps within anarchism.
 
Rothbard defined property as that which is acquired and transferred without any interference from the State. It should only be acquired through voluntary trade, gift, or labor-based original appropriation, rather than through aggression or fraud. He defined the self-ownership principle:
 
“The basic axiom of libertarian political theory holds that every man is a self-owner, having absolute jurisdiction over his own body. In effect, this means that no one else may justly invade, or aggress against, another’s person. It follows then that each person justly owns whatever previously unowned resources he appropriates or ‘mixes his labor with’. From these twin axioms – self ownership and ‘homesteading’ – stem the justification for the entire system of property rights titles in a free-market society. This system establishes the right of every man to his own person, the right of donation, of bequest (and, concomitantly, the right to receive the bequest or inheritance), and the right of contractual exchange of property titles” (Rothbard, “Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution,” Cato Journal, Spring 1982, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 55-99). 
 
This matter of property represents the fundamental difference between the modern Cultural Marxist, PC form of “anarchism” and the pure anti-Statism of the individualist anarchists. The former propose the abolition of private property, which would certainly increase the authority of the State and make people vulnerable to its inherent excesses. On the other hand, Anarchism by its very nature is voluntarist. In true nihilist fashion, the anarcho-communists advocated the abolition of money (see Rothbard, “The Death Wish of the Anarcho-Communists,” The Libertarian Forum, January 1, 1970), but this is another matter entirely. What is the meaning behind anarchism?
 
“I define anarchist society as one where there is no legal possibility for coercive aggression against the person or property of any individual. Anarchists oppose the State because it has its very being in such aggression, namely, the expropriation of private property through taxation, the coercive exclusion of other providers of defense service from its territory, and all of the other depredations and coercions that are built upon these twin foci of invasions of individual rights” (Rothbard, Society and State). 
 
Sufism and the End of Metaphysics
 
These individual rights mentioned by Rothbard were already protected by Islam. We have transcended these other forms of thinking about the world, including the heresies of fundamentalists and modernists alike. Our belief is an-archic, in the sense that it reflects the culmination of the Heideggerian understanding that metaphysical foundations of thinking have been eliminated.
 
We understand that with the end of philosophy, Islam is the only force which can take over the gauntlet to roll back the power of the State. The other religions have already been subverted by the Global Capitalist world-view which have relegated them to mere theologies without any relevance on the social, economic and political realms. Hence, all have acknowledged the superiority of Economics – except for Islam.
 
Islam stands as a distinct alternative to the process of deconstruction which has reduced other religions to a position that will not disrupt the Capitalist order. Jean Baudrillard condemned this trend towards a relativism which defines itself in terms of political correctness and the cult of victimology, confiding to the Catholic conservative Rene Girard that “the whole world, including China and Japan, is implicated in the postmodern fragmentation and uprootedness that leaves values behind. There is one exception: Islam. It stands as a challenge to the radical indifference sweeping the world” (Global Viewpoint, 11 May 2005).
 
The potential role of Islam, in its purest Sufi understanding, to reverse these trends has been recognized by a number of truth-seekers who have submitted to the truly “anarchist” understanding that there is no Might nor Power except Allah – La Hawla wa la Quwata illa-billah. There is no Force except the Lord, hence our submission is only to Him because we find in this Tawhid the key to realizing our liberation from both our own soul (nafs) and the coercive pressures of others.
 
Sufi masters have always challenged the powers that be, whether they be tyrants or invaders. The ranks of liberation struggles have always been illuminated with their example. There is a lengthy story where Harun al-Rashid sought out a true teacher who was not a sycophant. He found such a teacher in Fuzail, who told him when the former asked if he could enter: “There is no such thing as authority. If you enter by force, you know what you are doing.”
 
There is much behind the aphorism “Anarchy is Order”. The Islamic conception of order is structuring one’s life according to the transcendent Divine Will, not according to the concepts of authority and control now dominant in this world. This understanding of Islam attracted such anarchists as Isabelle Eberhardt, Ivan Agueli, and Gustave-Henri Jossot, each of whom found its fullest expression in the Sufi tariqas. I have found that this structure is manifested in the Shadhili-Darqawi movement Murabitun, whose communities are quite de-centralized and have forged an alternative at all levels to the dominant Capitalist order.

Dr. Tomislav Sunic Writes to the Los Angeles Times Reply

Los Angeles Times
 Letters to the Editor
 letters@…
 timothy.rutten@…

 
Re: The extreme-right way to make a buck,” by Tim Rutten, LA Times, Aug. 16, 2008

 Dear Sirs,
 
The title of Mr. Rutten’s piece suggests that the surest way for a conservative scholar to become rich is by embracing an extreme right philosophy. This proposition does not sound convincing given that Rutten’s target, Dr Jerome Corsi, in his book The Obama Nation, discusses a topic which defies the canons of political correctness and which, in addition, could easily fall under the legal category of hate speech. In Europe, Dr Corsi would likely be subjected to thought police scrutiny, his tenure revoked, and his circle of friends would shrink to ground zero.
 
Also, Corsi was to be interviewed by a relatively small radio station, the “Political Cesspool” from Memphis, whose source of income is very frugal. Having been myself a Political Cesspool guest, I was amazed at the quasi monastic modesty and genuine courtesy of its staff. Its main host, Mr. James Edwards and his guests, debate issues ranging from ante-bellum Southern literature to international politics, including the rising tide of political censorship in Americ. The Southern Poverty Law Centre, which Mr Rutten cites as his source, would have us believe that the Political Cesspool is run by baseball club wielding skinheads, sporting swastikas and harassing minorities. This is not true. Labeling a person “white supremacist,” if he or she opposes the multicultural experiment, is the ugliest form of hate speech in which apparently the SPLC excels. Feigned multicultural conviviality, as recent history shows, always yields opposite results regardless of someone’s racialist or ecumenical beliefs. What happened in the Balkans yesterday is happening today in the Caucuses and will likely be tomorrow’s scenario in LA. Both Mr. Rutten and myself had some foreboding of race riots in April 1992. Note being able to reside on my professorial salary in a gated community in south LA, I decided to search for safer pastures, i.e. my “in-group” of my native and racially homogenous Croatia.

 Pursuant to the prevailing codes of intellectual duplicity Mr. Corsi and scores of other thought criminals in the USA and Europe, who lost their jobs or who are often maligned as racists, would have been better off had they not rocked the boat of political rectitude, and had they wisely avoided guilt by association. Instead, there are brave enough to tackle the topics that secretly preoccupy the minds of millions of white Europeans and Americans; uncontrolled non-European immigration and US military over-extension around the globe. Alas in the land of the brave and its appendage the European Union, modern Soviet-style ukases of political correctness prevent hundreds of “right wing” intellectuals from being heard.
 
Which purported right wing scholar, which white supremacist — as modern masters of discourse, dub their traditional conservative opponents — would not be happy to have access to the mainstream media or even catch a glimpse of his photo next to some op-ed in a big mainstream journal? This opportunity is rarely granted to them. They can only go on air at some small radio shows like Political Cesspool, a rare conservative outpost still resisting the onslaught of left-leaning intellectual mendacity.
 
On a personal level let me add the following. Having spent a good portion of my life both in communist multicultural Yugoslavia and in the capitalist West, including America, I pride myself on knowing rather well how these two systems work. The advantage of communism was that its party hacks and scribes lied so brazenly, they themselves had a hard time believing in their Communist Kingdom Come stories. By contrast the liberal discourse, coached in the fine semantics of human rights and masquerading as free speech, is more difficult to decipher. Its meta-language relies on generic expressions that are successfully deployed against would-be dissidents. Dreaded, shut-up words, such as “Nazi”, “anti-Semite”, and “white supremacist” float over dissenting opinion like an intellectual death sentence. Among academics in America and in Europe the intellectual ostracism of opponents is total. A professor without tenure must comply with an inventory of bizarre legal and verbal constructs of Bolshevik provenance, such as “ethnic sensitivity training,” “affirmative action,” “diversity,” etc, just to keep his job.
 
The author of the article might have avoided hasty conclusions about the right wing scene. May it come true, though, one day when he writes that “American publishing houses decided that there’s money to be made in funding right-wing boutique imprints…” Alas, with the current leftist-liberal cultural hegemony this is far likely for now.
 
Sincerely,
 Dr. Tom Sunic
 http://doctorsunic.netfirms.com
 Croatia
 Tel. 00385-1- 6261-55
 cell: 00385-91-793-9454
 tom.sunic@…
 
(Tom Sunic is a former US professor in political science, author and translator). His latest book is Homo americanus: Child of the Postmodern Age, 2007. He currently resides in Croatia.

Updated News Digest August 24, 2008 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“In 2042, the Republican Party platform will include a plan for comprehensive reform of the US’s national health care program.  Republican Congressmen will engage in furious debate in an attempt to limit the penalties for discrimination against homosexuals to fines rather than imprisonment.

Anybody who really merits the moniker “conservative” had better prepare to be a revolutionary at this point.”

  –”Senor Doug”

 

Afghanistan: Where Empire Goes to Die by Michael Scheuer

Jackbooted Airport Thugs by Emily Feder

ATF Hoodlums Attack Gun Store Owner

Buffalo PIGS Terrorize Family

Fat Children To Be Taken From Parents?

Texas School District to Arm Staff

Neocon Crybabies by Steven LaTulippe

The U.S. Government is Corrupt from Top to Bottom by Charley Reese

Warp Speed, Mr. Sulu?

Russophobia: A Political Pathology by Justin Raimondo

War in Georgia Shows US Foreign Policy is a Bust by Sheldon Richman

Who Started Cold War Two? by Pat Buchanan

For Most People, College is a Waste of Time by Charles Murray

Back in the U.S.S.R. by Daniel Koffler

Antiwar Conservatism by Dylan Waco

Georgia Versus Mother Russia…Another Neocon Scam? by Werner Scott

What is the White House Smoking? by Eric Margolis

Ambivalence of War by Charley Reese

George, Stay Out of Georgia by Bill Lind

Are You Ready for Nuclear War? by Paul Craig Roberts

Constitutions and Organic Bases by Shawn Wilbur

Blood in August: On Avoiding World War Three by John Zmirak

What Will a White Minority Mean for America? by Steve Sailor

Russia Threatens Nukes from AnarchoNation

Neocon Michael Ledeen Labels Italy a Terrorist Nation

“Sweet Neo Con” by The Rolling Stones

America’s Outrageous War Economy by Paul B. Farrell

Western Political Correctness Obscures Communist Atrocities by John Markley

I Resign from the Imperialist-loving Mount Pelerin Society by Paul Craig Roberts

Back in the USSA by William Norman Grigg

Gore Vidal: The Last Republican by Bill Kauffman

What Libertarianism is Not  by Johnny Kramer

The Narrative Versus the News by Justin Raimondo

Rice Goes Deeper Into the Absurd by Glenn Greenwald

War: Why Your Gas is so Expensive  Scott Horton Interviews Greg Palast

US Role in Georgia Cannot Be Ignored by Stephen Zunes

Musharraf Out, Like Nixon; Bush Still In, Like Flynn by Ray McGovern

Why Is Norman Finkelstein Not Allowed to Teach?  by David Klein

Norman Finkelstein: A Pariah in Exile   by Stewart Ain

The Pyramid of the Capitalist System  by Francois Tremblay

America’s New Economic Plan…Nationalize Banks? Werner Scott

Extending NATO to Russia’s Borders is Insane by Thomas Sowell

Yellow Peril!-How the Beijing Olympics Became the Most Politicized Show on Earth by Brendan O’Neill

Drug Legalization as a Defensive Measure

Berlin: Seven Banks Attacked in Protest of Energy Companies

The Politics of Prisons

Thoughtful Anarchy by John Steele

Martial Law in America

International Criminal Court Should Leave Georgia Alone  by Helen Rittelmeyer

China’s Religious Problem-And Ours by Grant Havers

And None Dare Call It Treason-McCain Advisor’s Georgia Connection by Pat Buchanan

Scalia on the Loose by Daniel Koffler

The Paradoxical Nature of the Geopolitics of Secession by Thomas N. Taylor

Interview with Pam Africa and Ramona Africa

The Anarchists Are Coming

National Day of Action Against Electoral Politics

The Military Commissions, So Far by Joanne Mariner

The Middle Kingdom’s Middle Way by Jean-Louis Rocca

All Experts Agree-Legalize Drugs by Julian Critchley

The Shape of Cuba’s Reforms by Saul Landau and Nelson P. Valdes

The Futility of Hope by James Leroy Wilson

Soldier Worship by Laurence Vance

The State’s Legitimacy Crisis by Bill Lind

Bizarro Imperialism by Justin Raimondo

Why Not to Trust Your School

For or Against? Attitudes Towards Capitalism in German or Italian Fascism by Troy Southgate

Street Justice: Good or Evil?

Afghanistan Invasion Going From Bad to Worse by Werner Scott

More Mischief from the Gangsters in Blue by Rad Geek

Texas Truant Students to be Tracked by GPS Anklets

Why Not Let the Republicans Deals with this Mess? by Dave Lindorff

Biden: “I Am A Zionist”

Please Donate to Antiwar.Com!

Updated News Digest August 17, 2008 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“What are kingdoms but great robber bands? What are robber bands but small kingdoms? The band itself is made up of men, is ruled by the command of a leader, and is held together by a social pact. Plunder is divided in accordance with an agreed-upon law. If this evil increases by the inclusion of dissolute men to the extent that it takes over territory, establishes headquarters, occupies cities and subdues peoples, it publicly assumes the title of kingdom!”

-St. Augustine

Child Protection or Child Persecution?

Entire Arkansas Town Placed Under Curfew/House Arrest in the Name of the Drug War

The Law is an Ass by Becky Akers

You Belong to the State by Tom Woods

The American Police State by Bill Anderson

The Bogus Mythology of WW2 by Eric Margolis

Viva South Ossetia! by Justin Raimondo

America’s Israel-Occupied Media by Philip Giraldi

The American Military Crisis by Andrew Bacevich and Tom Engelhardt

Georgia: The Messy Truth by Brendan O’Neill

Massive US Naval Armada Heads For Iran by Lord Stirling

Bill Kauffman interviewed by The Southern Avenger

From Stupid to Moronic to Evil by Paul Craig Roberts

Obama and Cindy McCain Should Be Drug War Felons

The Problem is Still Privilege by Jeremy Weiland

The Theory of Property by Pierre Joseph Proudhon

Queens City Councilman Wants NYC to Secede

New England Groups Look to Secede by Jim Kozubek

Jon Stewart Interviews The Big Sort‘s Bill Bishop

Georgia War a Neocon Election Ploy?  by Robert Scheer

The Case Against the Fed by Murray Rothbard

Poor Little Georgia-Not! by Justin Raimondo

The Seeds of Another Cold War? by Anthony Gregory

Playing With Fire in the Caucasus by Doug Bandow

Israeli Arms Sales to Georgia Raise New Concerns by Peter Hirschberg

Neocons Now Love International Law by Robert Parry

Hypocrite Bush by Matthew Rothschild

Neocon Hypocrisy on Georgia and Iraq by Jacob Hornberger

Solzhenitsyn in America by Jeffrey Hart

Not Every Violation of the Law is a Crime by Jeremy Weiland

The Temperance Movement’s Effect on Drug Use by Radley Balko

Guardian Angels to Patrol Oakland Streets

International Sensitivity by Rad Geek

The Political Economy of Distributism by John Medaille

What’s Behind the War in Georgia? by Larry Gambone

After Multiculturalism: The Politics of Race and the Dialectics of Liberty by Chris Sciabarra

The Twilight of National Sovereignty by Paul Gottfried

China’s Island of Stability by John Derbyshire

The Tyranny of Liberalism by Jim Kalb

Is the Conservative Movement Worth Conserving?  by Austin Bramwell

Blowback from Bear-Baiting by Patrick Buchanan

Raping the Military     by Jared Taylor

Mikheil Saalashvili: War Criminal by Justin Raimondo

America’s Destructive Asian Empire Scott Horton interviews Eric Margolis

Old Man Hayek Had a Farm by Jim Henley

National Anarchism and National Socialism by Bay Area National Anarchist

Sometimes I Would Rather Be on the Outside Looking In Edd Merritt

Robotism: Learned Helplessness by Thomas N. Naylor

JFK Blown Away…What Else Do I Have to Say? by AnarchoNation

Secession Tales by Bill Buppert

Don’t Blame Food Stamp Recipients by Greg Perry

On Thin Ice by Ted Galen Carpenter

The Neocons Do Georgia by Paul Craig Roberts

“President Bush, Will You Please Shut Up?”  by Paul Craig Roberts

The Daily Show Live from the White House by Paul Craig Roberts

The Israel-Georgia-Washington Network by Richard Spencer

How to Perform a Citizen’s Arrest of a Bush Administration Official by Nathan Robinson

Anglo-Saxon Ethnocentrism and the Weakness of “White Nationalism” from AnarchoNation

Twelve-Year Old Girl Tells the Truth About Georgia

How Houston Gets Along Without Zoning

Green Party Presidential Candidate Cynthia McKinney Speaks to the Nation of Islam

Updated News Digest August 10, 2008 Reply

Quote of the Week:

“I sometimes wonder if Americans have enough sense to justify their continued existence as an independent country.”       -Paul Craig Roberts

R.I.P. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Death, the Drug War and Corey Maye  by William Anderson

Don’t Call the Cops. Ever. by Dan Spielberg

The End of the Republic  by Charley Reese

US Threatens Instability in Pakistan by Eric Margolis

Is China a Model for US Conservatives? by Jacob Hornberger

Losing Afghanistan  by Leon Hadar

Korea Reveals US Massacres in the 1950s

Israel and Identity  by Grant Havers

Grand New Party, Same Old Illusions Part Two  by Austin Bramwell

Recuperated Enterprises-Theirs and Ours  by Kevin Carson

Mary Kate Olsen Stands Up to the PIGS

When You Have to Leave America to be Free by Charles Davis

U.S. Army Private LaVena Lynn Johnson R.I.P.  by Elizabeth Higgs

Leave the United States If You Can by Wendy McElroy

Marx in the Morning by Brad Spangler

Marching Off Into Tyranny by Paul Craig Roberts

Mr. Obama, Welcome to the Big League by Pat Buchanan

Blackwater Thugs Get into the Drug War Business

How the West (Except for the U.S.) Ended Slavery  Tom DiLorenzo

Hiroshima and Nagasaki by Ralph Raico

The Looming Federal Default: Sooner or Later?  by Gary North

Iran and Al-Qaeda Michael Scheuer interviewed by Scott Horton

George Soros: Philanthropist Spook by Heather Coffin

The National Revolutionary Faction and the National Autonomous Zone  by Bay Area National Anarchists

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The Politics of Transhumanism 4

changesurfer.com

Version 2.0 (March 2002)

   

James J.  Hughes, Ph.D.

Originally Presented at the 2001 Annual Meeting of the
Society for Social Studies of Science
Cambridge, MA
November 1-4, 2001

For more information please contact:
James Hughes Ph.D.
Public Policy Studies, Trinity College,
71 Vernon St., Hartford CT, 06106, 860-297-2376,
jhughes@changesurfer.com, www.changesurfer.com

Abstract

Transhumanism is an emergent philosophical movement which says that humans can and should become more than human through technological enhancements. Contemporary transhumanism has grown out of white, male, affluent, American Internet culture, and its political perspective has generally been a militant version of the libertarianism typical of that culture. Nonetheless transhumanists are becoming more diverse, with some building a broad liberal democratic philosophic foundation in the World Transhumanist Association. A variety of left futurist trends and projects are discussed as a proto-“democratic transhumanism.” The essay also discusses the reaction of transhumanists to a small group of neo-Nazis who have attempted to attach themselves to the transhumanist movement.  For the transhumanist movement to grow and become a serious challenge to their opposites, the bio-Luddites, they will need to distance themselves from their elitist anarcho-capitalist roots and clarify commitments to liberal democratic institutions, values and public policies. By embracing political engagement and the use of government to address equity, safety and efficacy concerns about transhuman technologies, transhumanists are in a better position to attract a larger, broader audience.

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